Tag: 3000一个月包学生

Students, University respond to arrests

first_imgIn response to the large number of students recently arrested and incarcerated for underage drinking, representatives from the University and student government met with the South Bend Police Department (SBPD) this week.  “It’s the pattern to me that is of most concern,” he said. “We need to make sure that our students’ rights and their dignity is protected and that’s why we went down to meet with them face to face.” He added that it is not excise officers’ protocol to incarcerate people for underage drinking, but certain conditions may provoke it. Doyle asked students, especially those who are underage, to be “model citizens” in the community this weekend. Trent expects complaints will subside once the weather cools down because parties will move indoors and residents will sleep with their windows shut.  Indiana State Excise Police Commander Lt. Tim Cleveland said excise police will also be in St. Joseph County this weekend, but does not have plans to step up enforcement. Doyle said the University met with police because students repeatedly shared stories in which they felt their rights or dignity had been violated when interacting with law enforcement officers.  These meetings opened communication channels and resulted in small changes in SBPD procedure, Fr. Tom Doyle, vice president for Student Affairs said. The recent trend to incarcerate students — rather than issue citations — stems from the fact that police hold a certain amount of liability for students who are allowed to go home, Trent said. “There were lots of conversations we can work on within student government that can lead to greater changes,” she said. “As long as they’re in proximity to the car, there will be an audio account,” he said. “This is for the officer’s security and this is for everybody’s security.” “I expect my officers to be respectful of those that they’re citing or arresting, and likewise we expect those who are being issued summons or arrested to be respectful as well,” he said.  South Bend police officers will wear and activate body microphones, Doyle said. “We’re not in a situation any longer where we can just shrug and allow 50 or 100 students in a residential neighborhood to just disperse,” Trent said.  Trent said officers are responding to noise complaints and are “not trying to hinder or put a stop to the college experience.” “From our perspective, we’re getting calls from people and they’re saying ‘I’m trying to sleep and there’s a mob behind my house,’” he said. But Doyle also said there are two sides to every story and used the University’s meeting with police Tuesday as an opportunity to hear from the other side.  Cleveland also encouraged students to work with law enforcement officers and said “a little cooperation goes a long way.”  “If they’re not cooperative or they’re too intoxicated, then I’ll leave that to my officers discretion as whether to incarcerate,” he said.  Going into the first home football weekend, there will be 25 South Bend police officers patrolling the city Friday and Saturday night, Soler said.  “They have a very hard job to do and we understand that,” he said.  Doyle said SBPD was “receptive” and Soler agreed. She said student government plans to meet with police again within two weeks.  For example, if a group of people are stopped on Washington Street, two miles from campus, they would have a lengthy walk back to campus after being issued a citation and could potentially get into trouble. Police have also noticed younger students appear “profoundly drunk,” even when they have low blood alcohol contents, because of their lack of experience with alcohol.  SBPD spokesman Capt. Phil Trent attributes this change to circumstances, rather than a “conspiracy.” Trent said Notre Dame student off-campus housing used to be concentrated around Eddy Street and Notre Dame Avenue, as were the bars and night spots for students.  Now, students live in more residential neighborhoods and parties draw more complaints. Student body president Catherine Soler met with the SBPD Thursday night, and said the aim of this meeting was to decrease tensions between the student body and law enforcement officers. Both the University and police recognized the attention to, and punishment for, alcohol related violations this year is different than it has been in the past. “Our hope is that we can get through this weekend without significant incident or conflict, that we can start to build the kinds of communication channels between administration and students and law enforcement where we’re not so much in conflict with one another,” he said. Soler said the student body can expect an e-mail from student government detailing the meeting with SBPD sometime today.  “They are going to continue to do their job, but with a bit more of an understanding of the student’s perspective,” student body president Catherine Soler said after Thursday night’s meeting. “There is definitely going to be more discretion in the situations involving arrests and ticketing.”last_img read more

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Fuerzas Comando takes place in Colombia

first_imgBy Dialogo July 24, 2014 Special operations and commando forces from Belize, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, the United States and Uruguay will participate in the competition. The opening ceremony for the 10th Fuerzas Comando exercise kicked off the competition, July 23. Prior to the start of the competition, the teams spent two days validating the events and their equipment in preparation for the exercise. The grueling eight-day competition will test the elite forces in areas such as physical fitness, weapons marksmanship, aquatic skills and tactical capabilities. The exercise concludes with a multi-national airborne operation and wing exchange ceremony, July 30, and the closing ceremony, July 31. The Countering Terrorism Fellowship Program or CTFP will take place simultaneously during the competition. This year, senior military and government officials from more than 20 nations will gather in Bogota, July 28-30, to discuss regional challenges such as transnational organized crime and illicit trafficking. The Fellowship Program is designed to improve military-to-military relations and provides a collaborative environment for regional military leaders. Both the exercise and Fellowship Program are aimed at enhancing training and strengthening regional and multinational cooperation, mutual trust, readiness and interoperability of special operations forces in the Western Hemisphere.last_img read more

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COVID-19 poses challenges for Indonesia’s female peacekeepers

first_imgUN Secretary-General António Guterres said that women held a central role in UN peacekeeping operations because they had greater access to local communities, improved the protection of civilians and promoted human rights in the line of duty.But the outbreak threatens to upend their most vital work.As a civil military coordination (CIMIC) officer embedded with UNIFIL, First Lt. Rima Eka Tiara Sari is used to interacting with the local community, but now she is mostly coordinating remotely with local authorities and nongovernmental organizations because of the pandemic.“We still do [border patrols] while following protocols like wearing masks, using hand sanitizer and gloves,” Rima told reporters in a virtual briefing on Wednesday, hosted by the UN Information Center in Jakarta. In many of the world’s conflict regions where health may be one of the first casualties, the coronavirus poses a discernible threat to the local population.This is largely the case in south Lebanon, where sporadic skirmishes still occur at the border with Israel, and the only medical facilities are located at the compound of the United Nations peacekeeping mission.The COVID-19 outbreak has had the unintended consequence of putting an end to all direct contact with the Lebanese people, a vital aspect to the work female peacekeepers do, according to Indonesian peacekeepers with the UN Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL). “But other activities like the various [civilian] training programs are postponed until the COVID-19 outbreak ends,” added the 37-year-old psychology graduate from Semarang, Central Java.UNIFIL was formed in 1978 to oversee the withdrawal of Israeli forces from Lebanon and to assist the Lebanese government in restoring its authority. Among its operational activities is patrolling along the “Blue Line” border demarcation between Lebanon and Israel, established by the UN in 2000.Another Indonesian UNIFIL operative, Second Sgt. Yazella Agustin, also lamented that the outbreak had greatly reduced her interaction with civilians.“We can only contact them by phone to ask them about the latest situation, whether it is a problem caused by the coronavirus, an economic situation or other things,” Yazella said at Wednesday’s press briefing.Many medical workers on the forefront of the COVID-19 response are putting their own health at risk to protect the Lebanese people and the UN peacekeepers stationed there. But even such crucial services had been forced to stop, said First Sgt. Imakulata Ngamel, an Indonesian Air Force nurse stationed with the UNIFIL’s Indonesian battalion. “We can no longer accept local patients,” she told the briefing.Foreign Minister Retno Marsudi on Thursday reiterated the nation’s concerns about the impacts of the COVID-19 crisis on countries in conflict, that Indonesia was committed to upholding any and all efforts to resolve conflict and build peace.Earlier this month, the minister noted that the already vulnerable situation in conflict countries had “now worsened […] due to limited health infrastructure, fragile security, challenging economic situations and humanitarian conditions”.According to data on May 29 compiled by statistics site Worldometer, 1,168 people have tested positive for COVID-19 in Lebanon, with 26 total deaths. While 699 people have recovered, the country’s economy has been hit hard, with businesses closing down and people losing their jobs.Separately, the Foreign Ministry’s director general for multilateral cooperation, Febrian Ruddyard, said that the safety and security of Indonesian peacekeepers were of utmost priority.“During Indonesia’s presidency of the UN Security Council last year, we specifically raised the issue of the safety and security of peacekeepers through training and capacity building,” he said.Febrian, who leads Indonesia’s Peace Maintenance Mission Coordination Team (TKMPP), said that the government was closely monitoring the latest developments in the field while ensuring that all missions followed the UN’s COVID-19 health protocols.He said that Indonesia was also deliberating a draft UN Security Council resolution on managing the pandemic amid the challenging conditions in conflict areas.“We are paying very close attention to our peacekeepers because they are our assets that we lend to the world, in this case to the UN,” said Febrian.Friday is the 20th anniversary of the International Day of UN Peacekeepers. The day is paying special tribute to female peacekeepers with this year’s theme, “Women in Peacekeeping: A Key to Peace”.UN Undersecretary-General for Peace Operations Jean-Pierre Lacroix said in a statement that “ensuring women’s meaningful, equal and full participation in peace operations, as well as in peace and political processes, is key to protecting civilians and building durable peace”.However, women represent just 6 percent of all uniformed military, police, justice and corrections personnel in field missions, according to the UN.As a nonpermanent member of the UN Security Council, Indonesia has advocated for women’s participation in peace processes with an aim to increase the deployment of female peacekeepers to more than 3 percent at present.Out of the 2,852 military and police officers Indonesia has deployed to nine UN peacekeeping operations around the world, only 159 are women.Topics :last_img read more

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ERAFP teams up with Amundi to reduce carbon footprint of portfolio

first_imgERAFP, the €16bn French public sector pension fund, is to lower the carbon output of a €750m equity portfolio by more than one-third.The scheme – a signatory to the Montreal Carbon Pledge together with PGGM, the UK’s Environment Agency Pension Fund and AP4 – said it would be working with French manager Amundi to lower the carbon intensity of one of its portfolios by 40%.It said the portfolio’s index would employ a ‘best in class’ approach, additionally excluding the 5% of companies deemed most polluting and the bottom 20% of companies in each sector.“While monitoring this mandate closely, ERAFP will continue its work on measuring carbon and climate risks with a particular focus on supporting research and development initiatives aimed at assessing the alignment of investments with climate objectives,” the fund added in a statement. Julian Poulter, executive director of the Asset Owners Disclosure Project, said the main argument for reducing the carbon footprint was not about morals or ethics but financial risk.Philippe Desfossés, chief executive at ERAFP, added: “It is hard to dispute that carbon is a risk. So how can we fulfil our duty of trust if we don’t implement the systems necessary to assess this risk to reduce it? And worse still, having measured the risk, we don’t disclose it to stakeholders?”The Montreal Carbon Pledge hopes to attract institutions worth $3trn to the initiative in time for the Paris climate change talks.Swedish buffer fund AP4 and France’s Fonds de Réserve pour les Retraites previously committed €1bn each to low-carbon indices designed with Amundi.,WebsitesWe are not responsible for the content of external sitesLink to homepage of Montreal Carbon Pledgelast_img read more

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UK books Qatari LNG cargo pair

first_imgImage courtesy of MHPAThe United Kingdom has booked a couple of Qatari liquefied natural gas cargoes for its two import facilities at the Milford Haven waterway. The 210.110-cbm LNG carrier, Duhail is scheduled to dock at the Dragon LNG terminal at Waterston, Milford Haven in Pembrokeshire on April 20.The second cargo is heading to the South Hook liquefied natural gas terminal onboard the Al Sadd LNG carrier. The vessel with 210,000-cbm cargo capacity is scheduled to arrive at the facility on April 23.Both cargoes have been lifted at the Ras Laffan liquefied natural gas complex in Qatar the shipping data from the Milford Haven Port Authority shows.The South Hook LNG terminal, owned by Qatar Petroleum, ExxonMobil and Total, can provide around 20 percent of Britain’s natural gas requirements.The Dragon LNG terminal at Waterston, Milford Haven in Pembrokeshire, is owned by Shell (50 percent) and Petronas (50 percent).The facility has a maximum gas send out rate to the NTS of 7.6 billion cubic meters of gas per annum. The terminal can supply up to 10 percent of the UK’s energy needs. LNG World News Stafflast_img read more

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Barbados leads the way in fertility healthcare for US patients

first_img Sharing is caring! Tweet Share Share Flag of Barbados. Image via: flagsofnet.comBRIDGETOWN, Barbados — Barbados Fertility Centre (BFC) will be featured in the Vanguard documentary ‘Under the knife abroad’, which airs on Monday 14 November 9:00pm PST/8:00pm CT on Current TV. The documentary looks at the future of US healthcare and how many Americans are forced to leave their homes for affordable treatment outside of the US. BFC is a JCI accredited centre of excellence for IVF treatment and is considered to be one of the leaders in the field of reproductive medicine with success rates as high as 71% for women under 35. These success rates are attributed to the cutting edge technology employed by the medical team combined with the relaxing option of undergoing treatment on the Caribbean island of Barbados, which is only 3 hours from Miami and 4 hours from New York with daily direct flights. With treatment costs less than half at BFC of what US couples are paying for IVF at home. The airing of the documentary also coincides with the launch of The Fertility App, available from the App store, which has been developed by BFC to support every woman who has made the life changing decision to start a family covering everything from ovulation through to a positive pregnancy test. Dr Juliet Skinner, head clinician at BFC said. “We pride ourselves on offering our patients the latest in technology to help them conceive, and are delighted to be able to share our knowledge with women across the globe via The Fertility App.” Infertility affects one in six couples worldwide, and if a couple tries to conceive for more than 12 months without success then they need to seek medical advice. The app has been designed to help women conceive with an ovulation calculator, which is connected to the calendar. This then syncs with the users device to send them alerts and reminders. The user can add appointments and medications and there is a full medical glossary explaining all the medical terms associated with both male and female fertility. There is also a full description of pre conception supplements and medications and their effects on the body when trying to conceive. BFC have also compiled a list of the most frequently asked questions from their patients and there is a healthy lifestyle section to improve a couple’s chance of success. Within the Fertility App there is the opportunity to connect with BFC on Facebook and Twitter for daily updates from the medical team, they can also watch videos on the BFC YouTube channel and connect with other people trying for a baby in the patient support forum. If a couple have had no success after 12 months and need medical assistance they can also connect directly with the BFC medical team from within the app and request a consultation with Dr Skinner or go directly to the BFC website for more information. Caribbean News Nowcenter_img 15 Views   no discussions Share HealthLifestyle Barbados leads the way in fertility healthcare for US patients by: – November 11, 2011last_img read more

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