Tag: 飞雪商务模特贵吗

All square atop the Big 5 standings

first_imgThe performance was far from perfect, but the result was everything Del Norte could have hoped for, as the Warriors defeated the Tigers 7-2 in Big 5 softball action at Arcata High Tuesday afternoon.The win lifts the Del Norte girls into a tie with McKinleyville atop the Big 5 standings, with each team off to a perfect 3-0 start early in the campaign.The visitors broke open a tight game with four runs in the top of the third and took advantage of too many Arcata errors and some solid pitching …last_img read more

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The Limits of Scientific Speculation

first_imgHow far can a scientist speculate and get a respectful hearing, just because he or she is a scientist?  One case to examine is a story on PhysOrg, “The Chance for Life on Io” (see also Astrobio.net).  Jupiter’s innermost large moon Io might be considered the last place to look for life.  It is the most volcanically active place in the solar system.  Its surface varies between scalding hot lava lakes 1649°C and frozen sulfur dioxide snowfields at -130°F.  Beside that, the surface is bathed in Jupiter’s deadly radiation – and there is no liquid water.  Yet astrobiologist Dirk Schulze-Makuch at Washington State University speculates that there could be life there.    In the article, Schulze-Makuch acknowledges that most other scientists generally dismiss Io as a habitat for life, but he thinks there might have been a time in its history when water ice was plentiful, and if ice was there, liquid water might have been there, too.  If liquid water was there, maybe life was there.  If life evolved, maybe some if it went underground and still survives below the surface.  He thinks that the possibility is enough to warrant a future mission to Io to look for signs of life.    The comments after this article were interesting.  Readers got into questions of creation and evolution, atheism and religion.  One called it sheer speculation, but no one seemed to ask whether it was a scientific practice to engage in this kind of evidence-free speculation.Some of the Darwiniac drive-by mudslingers who pass by this site call what happens here “science bashing.”  OK, please: where is the science in the above PhysOrg story?  If you will point it out, we will gladly respect it and honor it.  Why?  Because we love science here (e.g., 06/12/2010, 06/09/2010 and 650 more “Amazing Facts” entries).  But we deplore nonsense.  Is it OK to bash nonsense?  Would you Darwiniacs join with us in bashing nonsense?    This astrobiologist has asked for willing suspension of disbelief by taking the most unlikely body in the solar system for finding life and telling us it might be under the surface.  OK, let’s play that game.  It might be under the sun, too.  After all, the sun has the building blocks of life: protons and electrons.  The sun is not a very likely place for life now, but early in its history it was cooler.  You never know, maybe life arose in a form we cannot even imagine – and maybe it persists today!  We shouldn’t rule that out.  NASA should send a probe to the sun to search for life under the sun.  (No, we won’t add the old joke about doing it at night.)    That extreme example could be multiplied endlessly with milder examples throughout the solar system.  We could speculate endlessly and mindlessly about life on Mimas, or Ganymede, or Iapetus, Pluto, Venus, Miranda, Triton, whatever.  Lots of bodies have water ice.  Many of them might have liquid water deep down under the surface.  Why stop at the current astrobiology favorites of Mars, Titan and Europa?  As long as evidence isn’t required, speculate at will.  All that is necessary is (1) Be a “scientist” in the modern sense (i.e., have a degree, work at a university), which entails no obligation of being correct, and (2) have the Darwinians on your side.  Then you are guaranteed to have a lapdog press to propagandize your views without critical analysis, and an army of Darwin Dobermans who will viciously attack anyone who calls your nonsense speculations “nonsense” as engaging in “science bashing.”  Most of our readers are astute enough to see what is going on.(Visited 10 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Is organic worth it? It depends…

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest When someone asks me if buying organic is worth the extra cost, I tell them, “It depends.” To simply issue a blanket statement that organic production is better for the environment and better for you is simply inaccurate, though it is a message regularly touted as gospel by many in the organic industry. But, of course, we all know that “it depends” is a poor marketing ploy.The truth is, though, that “it depends” is a necessity of working with Mother Nature. Every factor of production on every farm (organic or not) has a wide range of complex components that make any claims or consumer-held beliefs that organic food is more nutritious, safer and better for the environment very misleading.Demand for organic production continues to grow. In recent years, organic food sales have risen by double digits annually and organic food revenue has tripled over the past decade to a record $36 billion in 2014. Organic sales are predicted to increase 12% to 15% annually for the next couple of years.With more options to choose from than ever before, which-food-label-is-better-for-my-family type questions are becoming increasingly prevalent. As the growing season starts to take off and the battle for consumer dollars in farmers markets and grocery stores heats up, there will be countless shoppers out there wondering while wandering the aisles: “Is organic really better and worth the extra cost?”Unfortunately it is hard for them to get a straight answer. At the farmers market, the guy selling the non-organic produce tells them his product is the best quality, and it is cheaper. At the next booth over, the organic guys says his is better for the environment and healthier. An Internet search will lead to more of the same. With such muddled facts at their disposal, concerned shoppers can be very tempted to err on the side of organic with the hope that their higher dollar purchase is really what is best for their family. After all, it costs more so it must be better, right?If shoppers are willing to pay more for their food and it benefits the farmer’s bottom line, then that is wonderful. The problem, however, is that amid the muddled information available to them, most consumers I have talked with do not really understand the realities of the differences between organic and non-organic food. They just don’t.How is it that in an era of the expectation of ever-increasing transparency in our food system, consumers (especially those paying more for their organic food) are more confused than ever? Most organic buyers I have talked with have the perception that organic food is more nutritious, safer and better for the environment. Is this true? Well, sort of, maybe, or a flat no depending on the specifics of the farm situation.Every farm I have visited (and I have been to more farms than most) is an intricate balance of working with the realities of Mother Nature and the realities of maintaining a profitable business. Without these two vital components, there is no viable farm. There are inevitable trade-offs between these two often-competing factors that vary widely based on the specifics. A great online resource for science-based answers to food-related questions is: www.bestfoodfacts.org.Weed control, for example, can be done with chemicals, tillage (cultivation), hand weeding or some combination of the three. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages in terms of the environment and the economic realities of the farm.Organic production tends to rely more upon tillage and hand weeding, while conventional production typically relies more on chemicals.Tillage leads to carbon release from the soil and dramatically increases the potential for soil erosion and decreases in soil health. Chemical control introduces something synthetic into the environment, but saves fuel consumption and reduces soil erosion from tillage. Hand weeding takes a huge amount of labor, which reduces the viability of the farm. The realities of weed control can be positive or negative for the environment, the farmer, and the consumer depending on the specifics of each individual operation.I have the unique and wonderful opportunity to work with all types of farms. And, honestly, some of my favorites through the years have been organic operations due to the ingenuity, incredible work ethic, dedication to the land, and success in terms of profitability of the operation. But I must say that I have met wonderful people with fantastic, environmentally sound operations of every type, size and scope. I have also seen failed attempts, mistakes and poorly run farms of every type, size and scope.I believe that anyone (organic or non-) who dedicates their life to combining seed and soil or harnessing the lifecycle of livestock to produce something deemed of value by society is participating in a miracle granted to mankind by God. I often get frustrated when we lose sight of this miracle while getting caught up in the mire of politics, marketing battles and opposing PR campaigns within agriculture.It is the responsibility of consumers to do the research (from reputable sources) to understand the details and, I believe, it is the responsibility of those in agriculture to transparently participate in that process. There are many ways to bring a high quality product to the marketplace and all of them have pros and cons. The various combinations of those pros and cons add up to a different value based upon the food purchasing goals of the consumer. So is organic worth the cost? It depends.last_img read more

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European Court Orders Google To “Forget” Old Search Results

first_imgA European court ruled that Google must delete “inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant” information from its search results when a user requests it. The ruling upholds the “right to be forgotten,” and allows people to cherry-pick their historical records and eliminate anything they don’t want other people to discover on the search engine.Google was hit with a “right to forget” lawsuit in Spain three years ago. The country’s Data Protection Agency ordered Google to remove search links on 90 people. The company refused to remove any data.See Also: How To Remove Yourself From The InternetAccording to the Guardian, in the first case of many against Google, Mario Costeja González from Spain wanted information relating to an auction for his repossessed home in 1998 erased from two pages on a newspaper’s website, and the European Court of justice ruled that under European Union data privacy laws, Google must remove the links that point to those pages.Google is the Internet’s encyclopedia, collecting and indexing public and historical information for people to find in the future. Allowing people to scrub history could also effectively let people rewrite it. If the ruling is upheld, people will be able to sanitize their background by erasing links to public information in one of the world’s largest information repositories.See also: Spain Asks Google For The Right To Be ForgottenEuropean citizens could now have greater control of their data, but questions remain on how people can enforce these rules, and even whether a “right to be forgotten” is a good idea in the first place. People should have a right to have their data protected online, and companies like Google and other social media companies have been slapped with lawsuits in the past for violating users’ rights. But there’s a big difference between private, personal data like information shared with friends on Facebook and public records that are published in a newspaper or other outlet online. In this case Google, as the collector of information around the Web, only has to remove the links that point to the information; it doesn’t have power to remove the information itself. The two pages are still live on the newspaper’s website, so a savvy user would eventually be able to find them, it would just take more than a cursory search.Lead image courtesy of Robert Scoble on Flickr 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market selena larson Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Tags:#European Union#Google#now#privacy#Right to be forgotten#Spain center_img Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…last_img read more

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