Tag: 韵道养生 飞机

The British Horse Society launches Hardship Fund for BHS Approved Riding Schools

first_img Advertisement The British Horse Society (BHS), has launched the BHS Approved Centre Hardship Fund to help support riding schools affiliated to the charity through the Covid-19 pandemic.The fund, launched on Friday 17 April, is specifically aimed at BHS Approved Riding Schools financially impacted by the pandemic, and designed to support any costs which go towards the health and wellbeing of the horses and ponies under their care.  James Hick, Chief Executive Officer at The British Horse Society said: “The coronavirus pandemic has caused immense difficulties for many areas across the equestrian industry and riding schools have been hit particularly hard. As their income stopped on March 23 but the need to look after the wellbeing of horses continues at high cost.  The welfare of horses is at the heart of everything the BHS does, and we are working incredibly hard to help support our Approved Ridings Schools through these unsettling times. We hope that this Hardship Fund will help alleviate some of the financial strain riding schools are currently facing, whilst also serving to protect the health and wellbeing of the horses and ponies under their care.”Grants from the fund will be allocated based on a payment of £750 per BHS Approved Riding School. The fund has been made available from several sources, including BHS National, Regional and County Committees, which work closely with BHS Approved Riding Centres. The British Horse Society has also accessed a number of its own restricted funds, held aside for welfare specific purposes.The BHS has also waived all Approved Centre membership fees for the next 12 months and will be launching a donations appeal in the coming weeks to help provide further support.All BHS Approved Riding Schools should have been received details on how to apply for the funding and can contact the BHS Approvals team on [email protected] or call 024768 40500 if not. Tagged with: COVID-19 Funding AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis3 The British Horse Society launches Hardship Fund for BHS Approved Riding Schools Melanie May | 24 April 2020 | News  1,332 total views,  8 views today  1,333 total views,  9 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis3 About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

Read more…

Super Spurs Thrash Sarri’s Chelsea 3-1

first_imgTottenham inflicted Maurizio Sarri’s first competitive defeat as Chelsea boss to leapfrog their London rivals into third in the Premier League with a 3-1 win at Wembley that barely reflected Spurs’ dominance.Dele Alli and Harry Kane put the hosts 2-0 in front inside 16 minutes and Son Heung-min’s brilliant individual run and finish early in the second-half hauled Mauricio Pochettino’s side back to within five points of league leaders Manchester City.Olivier Giroud pulled back a late consolation for Chelsea, who slipped eight points off the leaders with a dreadful display that left Sarri visibly frustrated. By contrast, Spurs couldn’t have started a huge week in better form with a do-or-die Champions League clash with Inter Milan and the North London derby against Arsenal to come.Chelsea were unbeaten in their first 18 games in all competitions under Sarri, but were blown away by a combination of Spurs’ flying start and some questionable defending.The world’s most expensive goalkeeper Kepa Arrizabalaga also failed to cover himself in glory for both of Spurs opening goals.Alli got ahead of his marker to flick home Christian Eriksen’s free-kick despite the £71 million Kepa getting a hand to the English international’s header.Eight minutes later Kane was given acres of room to stride forward and take aim from outside the area, but again Kepa could have done better as the Spaniard stood motionless while the ball nestled in the net low to his right.Chelsea felt aggrieved as they could have had a penalty seconds before Kane’s goal when Juan Foyth appeared to trip Eden Hazard inside the area.Alvaro Morata was then denied at point-blank range by Hugo Lloris as the visitors briefly threatened to get back into the game. But they remained a shambles at the back and were lucky not to be put to the sword more comprehensively after the break.Spurs’ solitary second-half goal was delivered in style by Son as he accelerated past Jorginho and David Luiz before slotting his 50th goal for the club into the far corner.Kane then somehow fired over with the goal at his mercy and Alli also skewed a great chance off target as Sarri bellowed at his side to regain some composure.The Italian managed to make a difference with the introduction of Ross Barkley, Pedro Rodriguez and Giroud from the bench. And it was Giroud who grabbed Chelsea’s consolation five minutes from time when he powered home Cesar Azpilicueta’s cross at the back post.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Son and Kane got a goal each in a dominant Spurs performancelast_img read more

Read more…

Chase Utley’s influence goes beyond analytics for Dodgers and their future

first_imgLOS ANGELES >> Baseball’s deep dive into statistical analysis has created a new language of exit velocities, launch angles, FIPs, WHIPs and BABIPs.But this is another new concept courtesy of the analytics crowd – a 37-year-old “bounceback candidate.”Chase Utley posted career-lows across the board offensively last season. A .212 batting average, .286 on-base percentage, .629 OPS and only eight home runs in over 400 plate appearances. Combined with the fact that he would turn 37 in December, the numbers seemed to scream of a player in decline. His 140 plate appearances with the Dodgers over the final two months of the season didn’t paint any prettier a picture (he hit .202 with a .654 OPS). Utley did bounce back. The oldest leadoff hitter in baseball this year, Utley has started 69 of the Dodgers’ first 94 games there – and eased a massive problem. Last year, Dodgers’ leadoff hitters (primarily Rollins and Joc Pederson) combined for the lowest batting average in the majors (.233), one of the lowest OBPs (.319, 20th) and fewest runs scored (93, 24th). Those numbers this season are a healthier middle of the pack in the National League.If not for a June swoon that lopped more than 20 points off his batting average, Utley’s individual statistics would be in line with most of his career norms.“I still feel like I can contribute. That’s the bottom line,” said Utley of his own belief in his bounciness.“Early in the (2015) season, first week or so, I felt like I was swinging the bat really well,” he said of his sub-par 2015, a season that started with him trying to play through an ankle injury suffered during an off-season workout. “For a couple weeks after that, even though I did swing the bat well I didn’t have a whole lot to show for it. At that point, I think it’s only natural to try to figure out a way to help your team. For me, I got out of what I’m most comfortable doing. Instead of trying to hit the ball hard I was trying to find places to hit the ball. And that didn’t work so well.“I took some time off (a six-week stint on the DL at mid-season) and got my body in more of a position to be successful. After that, I felt like I swung the bat okay, better than my baseball card would show. Obviously I appreciate that they were able to see beyond that.”For all their adherence to the measurables produced by an analytics department of unknown size but unquestioned influence, Dodgers president of baseball operations Andrew Friedman and Zaidi also saw beyond Utley’s value in the batter’s box. When they re-signed Utley, they readily admit they were paying for intangibles as well.“The leadership, the attention to detail he has for the game — it was a huge boost for us down the stretch and into the playoffs (in 2015) and was an important thing for us to get back,” Zaidi said. “He just has such a strong reputation that even if you didn’t get quite that (offensive) production there was a lot of value to having him on your team.”The Dodgers expect to benefit from that value well beyond Utley’s one-year contract. Dodgers manager Dave Roberts said he “absolutely” sees Utley’s old-school influence impacting the Dodgers’ new wave of talent, young players like Corey Seager, Trayce Thompson and Joc Pederson.“Unbelievable. I can’t even, don’t even know where to start,” Seager said when asked if Utley has had a positive influence on him. “He’s helped me on the field, off the field, in the clubhouse. Anything you can think or imagine I’ve asked him and he’s talked to me about.“Just little things I’m picking up that people do, tipping pitches and little stuff that I personally never looked at that he’s shown me, tried to involve me. Obviously I’m a work in progress. I’m not awesome at it even when I know what he’s doing, the tipping or whatever.”Seager said he followed Utley’s career while growing up in North Carolina. Now he finds his locker next to Utley’s in the Dodgers’ home clubhouse and becomes effusive when talking about the benefits that flow from that relationship, saying he believes “100 percent” that being Utley’s teammate will benefit his career.“Just watching his at-bats, watching him grind through at-bats – I’m lost for words how impressive it is,” Seager said. “Watching him as a fan while I was growing up, you just think he’s this great player. He’s just that much better than everybody. But you watch him work – he grinds everything out, his attention to detail is off the charts.”Utley acknowledges the responsibility he has to provide a positive role model for a future star like Seager as well as others, whether through words or action.“For me, I don’t want to always be that guy, the teammate telling someone what to do. That’s not the way to go about it,” Utley said. “I think you play the game the way you think you should and hopefully some guys see how that can be beneficial and try to implement that into their game.” Utley’s long-time double-play partner, Jimmy Rollins, had similar numbers in those categories over a full season with the Dodgers last season and found himself unsigned until late February this spring when he accepted a minor-league contract offer from the Chicago White Sox. He made the White Sox’s roster and took a deep paycut (from $11 million to $2 million) only to be released in mid-June.But Utley barely had to wait until December to re-sign with the Dodgers for $7 million with other suitors lined up, willing to sign a 37-year-old middle infielder coming off the worst season of his career.“It was a couple things,” Dodgers GM Farhan Zaidi said, explaining the thinking behind last winter’s most surprising decision by a front office that has advertised a desire to build a younger roster. “One, purely on the performance side, even when he was with us last year – he really had bad luck in that 150 at-bat sample. We looked at his hard-hit percentage, line drive percentage – that kind of stuff. It was actually very much in line with the numbers he’s putting up now. You would have thought he was a .280 to .300 hitter with .420 or .450 slug.“I think he was viewed as a strong bounceback candidate, that it (his poor offensive production) was going to be just one year.”center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

Read more…