Tag: 百花丛打不开了

Tune Into Free Video & Radio Streams Of LOCKN’ Festival This Weekend

first_imgLOCKN’ Festival opened its gates on Thursday morning, and fans were eager for the festival to announce a webcast, as the beloved Arrington, VA festival has done in past years. Luckily for fans unable to attend the festival this year, LOCKN’ has confirmed multiple options to watch and listen to the weekend’s festivities, including both the main stage lineup and late-night sets.SiriusXM and Relix have offered two different options for fans. SiriusXM’s Jam On (channel 29) will be broadcasting select sets throughout the weekend, starting on Friday, August 24th, at 2 p.m. (ET). SiriusXM’s coverage will include both of Dead & Company’s headlining sets, Widespread Panic with Margo Price, Tedeschi Trucks Band, Pigeons Playing Ping Pong, Spafford, George Clinton & P-Funk, Toots & The Maytals with Taj Mahal, Sheryl Crow, Turkuaz, and many more. SiriusXM’s full schedule for the weekend can be found below. You can listen live here.Additionally, Relix has partnered with Ben & Jerry’s and Airstream to webcast a free stream from LOCKN’. As of press time, Relix has yet to share their full webcast schedule for the weekend. Follow Relix’s YouTube channel below for LOCKN’ coverage throughout the weekend. You can tune in to the LOCKN’ webcast via www.relix.com/live.Relix LOCKN’ Festival Webcast 2018 [Video: Relix]Relix and LOCKN’ Festival are encouraging viewers and fans to register to vote. Festival organizers explain, “#TheFutureIsVoting, and your voice matters!” Register to vote by texting ‘VOTER’ to 40649. Already registered? Get location election alerts: text ‘VOTER’ to 40649. Want to help register voters at concerts? Text ‘VOLUNTEER’ to 40649.Click here to see the full weekend schedule.Lettuce (left) and Umphrey’s McGee (right) mid-transition on night 1SiriusXM’s Jam On (channel 29) Lockn’ Festival 2018 Broadcast Schedule (All Times ET)Friday, August 24th2 p.m. Ghost Light4 p.m. Turkuaz5 p.m. Moon Taxi6 p.m. Toots & The Maytals with Taj Mahal8:45 p.m. George Clinton & P-Funk10 p.m. Widespread Panic with Margo PriceSaturday, August 25th3:05 p.m. BIG Something4:05 p.m. Keller & The Keels5:05 p.m. Pigeons Playing Ping Pong6:05 pm. Foundation of Funk7:05 p.m. Tedeschi Trucks Band9:15 Dead & CompanySunday, August 26th12:30 p.m. Keller Williams’ Grateful Gospel2:15 p.m. Spafford3:15 p.m. Matisyahu4:15 p.m. Blues Traveler5:25 p.m. Sheryl Crow6:35 p.m. Tedeschi Trucks Band8:45 p.m. Dead & CompanyView Full SiriusXM Schedulelast_img read more

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Great War left an enduring legacy across Harvard

first_img Additional Veterans Day events Harvard Law School Thursday, 4 p.m. — Disabled American Veterans Distinguished Speaker Series: Chief Judge Robert N. Davis, U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims, WCC 2036 Milstein East B, Harvard Law School. Harvard Graduate School of Education Thursday, 2-3 p.m. — Veterans and Servicemembers Virtual Information Session. Prospective students will have a chance hear from and ask questions of an admission liaison and financial aid representative in addition to current HGSE students who are veterans and servicemembers. Register online to receive a login: https://apply.gse.harvard.edu/register/military2018 U.S. Army Cpl. Arthur Briggs Church, 32, was killed on a French battlefield during an attack on Germany’s fortified Hindenburg Line on Sept. 28, 1918.Marine Lt. Carleton Burr, 26, was leading his men in an advance on the battlefields of Picardie, France, when he was struck and killed by shrapnel on Sept. 20, 1918.And in the skies over Chamery, France, on Bastille Day 1918, Lt. Quentin Roosevelt, the 20-year-old son of President Theodore Roosevelt, was shot down and killed in a dogfight with a flock of German planes.Church, Burr, and Roosevelt, who all died in the final months of World War I, are just three of the 372 students, alumni and faculty whose names are engraved on the granite walls of the Memorial Room in Harvard’s Memorial Church.The Great War left an enduring legacy on the Harvard campus. The Memorial Church, its bell, and the Memorial Room are all testaments to the sense of loss the University community felt in its wake.“The Memorial Room commemorates the Harvard men who died in World War I, and to whom the church is dedicated,” said Edward Elwyn Jones, Gund University organist and choirmaster. “The Memorial Church holds such a prominent place on Harvard’s campus, and it is first a church dedicated to peace, but also to sacrifice. I think it is wonderful for us, especially this year, to be mindful of that sacrifice.”,Over the next several weeks, Memorial Church will commemorate the 100th anniversary of the end of the war with a series of performances featuring the music and composers of the era. The performances, which will all take place in the church sanctuary, are free and open to the public.Friday, noon — Uppsala University Chamber Ensemble musicians and French pianist Paul André Bempéchat present a concert of chamber music by Swedish romantic composers, including Wilhelm Peterson-Berger, Dag Wirén, André Chini, Christer Hermansson, and Gunnar de Frumerie.Saturday, 7:30 p.m. — Massachusetts vocalists Deborah Selig and David McFerrin and pianist Clifton J. Nobel present “Angel Spirits: Music of World War I.”Sunday, 4 p.m. — Harvard University Choir Concert, “Remembering,” featuring the music of Lili Boulanger and Charles Hubert Hastings Parry and the U.S. premiere of a new choral piece, “In Flanders Fields,” by Gareth Treseder.Friday, 9 a.m.‒noon; Saturday, 8 a.m.‒7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 1 p.m.‒4 p.m. — Exhibition of the wartime etchings of Alphege Brewer.Dec 4, 8 p.m. — The Tactus Ensemble, “Songs of Farewell.”The concerts offer a teaching moment about the war’s impact. The carnage decimated a generation, including its artists. The English composer Parry, for example, lost many of his former students, Jones said.“I talk a certain amount to our students about the history of the war itself, but also the artistic endeavors and reactions to the war,” he said. “Many artists and musicians fought during the war and many lost their lives. But the ones who were left behind were deeply affected by it. Parry’s reactions to the war are very visceral and we hear that in the music.” That deep sense of loss and sacrifice also permeates the Memorial Church, which was dedicated in 1932 to honor those in the Harvard community killed in World War I.Inscribed at the top of the wall of the Memorial Room are the words of Harvard President A. Lawrence Lowell, who also donated the church’s bell: “While a bright future beckoned, they freely gave their lives and fondest hopes for us and our allies that we might learn from them courage in peace to spend our lives making a better world for others.”The Memorial Church recognizes the service and sacrifice of all Harvard veterans, especially during Veterans Day weekend. The walls of the sanctuary are dedicated to more than 1,000 members of the Harvard community who died in World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War.,The Rev. Jonathan L. Walton, Plummer Professor of Christian Morals and Pusey Minister in the Memorial Church, said every time he steps into the church sanctuary and the Memorial Room he is reminded of the words of the Rev. Phillips Brooks, the longtime rector of Boston’s Trinity Church and namesake of Harvard’s Phillips Brooks House.“‘How carefully most men creep into nameless graves, when occasionally one or two forget themselves into immortality,’ Brooks wrote,” Walton said. “Etched on the walls are the names of men and women who were able to live a life that was worth living because they found a cause and a purpose greater than themselves. We continue to honor their service, their sacrifice, and their memory.”On Sunday, members of Harvard ROTC will speak at the Faith & Life Forum at 9:30 a.m. in the Buttrick Room. The Commemoration of Benefactors and of the War Dead will take place during the Sunday Service beginning at 11 a.m. Former Massachusetts Gov. Deval L. Patrick will preach. The church will also be open on Veterans Day from 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Morning Prayers, which begin at 8:30 a.m., will feature U.S. Army veteran Richard Martinez ’21.last_img read more

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Bar’s annual fee statements are on the way

first_img Bar’s annual fee statements are on the way Members may now pay their fees online at www.flabar.org Mark D. Killian Managing Editor Florida Bar members soon will receive their 2005-06 fee statements, reflecting no increase in annual fees and only minor modifications to the form.The fees are payable July 1 and are late after August 15.Members will receive one of two fee statements: one designed for active members and another for those who have elected inactive status. Annual fees are $265. Inactive members pay $175.“Members should be aware that the fee statements are two-sided and must be completed both front and back and be mailed along with their payment to cover their fees and sections joined,” Bar Finance Director Allen Martin said.Under the Rules Regulating The Florida Bar, fees postmarked after August 15 will be assessed a $50 late fee. Members who do not pay by September 30 will be deemed delinquent. The delinquency may be cleared by petitioning the Bar, paying the fees, the late fee, and a $150 reinstatement fee. Online Payment Members have the option to complete their annual fee statement and pay their fees online via the Bar’s Web site at www.flabar.org, an option exercised by more than 8,500 members last year. But to do so, members must first be registered on the Bar’s Web site. If you have not registered, go to www3.flabar.org, click on the “register” link and then follow the prompts. Instructions for paying Bar fees online also are includedwith the paper form mailed to your official Bar address. Challenge for Children Members also have an option to make a voluntary $45 contribution to The Florida Bar Foundation’s Lawyers’ Challenge for Children campaign to help bring the benefits of the law and of lawyers to the lives of poor children. The Foundation will dedicate Bar members’ contributions to legal assistance to children through grants to legal aid and legal services programs across the state, according to Bar President-elect Alan Bookman. (See story above.) Last year, Florida lawyers contributed more than $180,000 to the Challenge for Children campaign. Pro Bono Reports This year’s fee form again includes a pro bono section for Bar members to report if they have met the Supreme Court’s aspirational pro bono goals. The court asks lawyers to provide 20 hours of pro bono service or donate $350 to a legal aid program each year.A series of questions promulgated by the court appears on the fee statement, depending on what option the attorney selected. The court wants to know:• How many hours of pro bono service the lawyer donated and if the work was done through an organized legal aid program or on the lawyer’s own.• If the lawyer’s firm provided pro bono collectively under a plan operated by a circuit pro bono committee, with an indication of how much was allocated to the member.• If the lawyer has contributed to a legal aid organization in lieu of performing pro bono work.• Whether the attorney was unable to provide pro bono service or met the provision for being deferred.• How the lawyer fulfilled his or her service if done in some manner not specifically envisioned by the plan. Community Service This year’s fee statement again features a purely voluntary section that allows members to report the community and public service they have performed over the past year. The purpose is to obtain data to show contributions lawyers make by way of community service. Lawyers may voluntarily report whether they have provided service to the legal community, religious organizations, civic organizations, or other charities and the number of hours donated.The community service questions are separate from the court’s pro bono reporting requirements, and answering these questions does not constitute compliance with the required pro bono responses. Trust Accounting The statement requires that all lawyers indicate whether they comply with the Bar’s trust accounting requirements and the interest on trust accounts rule.answering the trust accounting question, members certify compliance with Bar rules that mandate, “All nominal and short-term funds belonging to clients or third persons which are placed in trust with any member of The Florida Bar practicing from an office or other business location within the state of Florida shall be deposited in one or more interest-bearing trust checking accounts in an eligible financial institution for the benefit of the Foundation.”The Florida Bar Foundation may be contacted at (800) 541-2195 (for in-state members only) or (407) 843-0045 to answer IOTA questions. Installments Members who meet eligibility requirements may pay annual fees in three equal installments. The first payment must be postmarked by August 15. To be eligible, members must be in the second or third year since admission to the Bar or be employed by a government agency in a nonelected position that requires the individual to maintain membership in good standing with the Bar. Only annual fees or prorated fees may be paid in installments. Section dues must be paid in full.The three payments must be postmarked by August 15, November 1, and February 1, 2006. The Bar will send statements for the second and third installments. A $50 late fee will be assessed if the second or third installment is received late. For more information on paying in installments, see Rule 1-7.3(c). Other Options Bar members also may join sections and the Out-of-State Practitioners Division using the fee form. The attorney’s current membership in a section is indicated on the form. To join other sections, members may darken the circles next to the section they want to join and include the appropriate amount with their membership fees. Note that several section have increased their membership fees this yearThe fee statement provides lawyers the opportunity to reduce their section dues by joining combinations of the Government Lawyer Section with the Administrative Law Section and/or the Criminal Law Section or the Administrative Law Section and the Criminal Law Section.Members may opt for inactive membership by marking the inactive status proclamation located near the bottom of the front page of the active membership statement and paying their fees by a postmark date of August 15. Active members may not elect inactive status online.Those who chose inactive status on last year’s statement will receive an inactive membership fee statement this year. It has many of the same features as the active membership fee statement, but does not allow the inactive member to join sections. Inactive members, however, can become affiliate members of the Out-of-State Practitioners Division or the Administrative Law, Entertainment, Arts and Sports Law, Environmental and Land Use Law, and Tax sections.choosing inactive status, Bar members will reduce their annual fees by $90 and receive automatic exemptions from continuing legal education requirements. They will, however, give up a number of privileges, including the privilege to practice or advise on Florida law or hold a job that requires a Florida law license; to participate in the Bar’s certification program; to vote in Bar elections or be counted for purposes of apportionment of the Board of Governors; and to receive Bar publications, including the Journal and annual directory.Inactive members continue to receive The Florida Bar News. Inactive members who wish to become active again must call the Bar’s Membership Records Department at (850) 561-5832 or (800) 561-8060, ext. 5832. May 15, 2005 Managing Editor Regular News Bar’s annual fee statements are on the waylast_img read more

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Riot Games to consolidate competitions into singular Latin American league

first_imgRiot Games has announced its plan to consolidate its two current Latin American League of Legends competitions into a singular league – the name of which is yet to be announced.Eight teams will face off in this new league starting in 2019, playing in Santiago de Chile, Riot Games believes the location contains means that are “essential for the future of the scene”. Riot Games originally made a decision in 2016 to segment Latin America into North and South to increase “the relevance, audience and internal of each of the leagues.” As the announcement admits, it didn’t quite work out as expected.As it stands, Riot Games currently operates both the America South Cup (also known as Copa Latinoamérica Sur or CLS) and the Latin America North League (also known as Liga Latinoamérica Norte or LLN). Each league sees eight teams in contention to win, though when the leagues are brought together, there will only be room for eight teams. Riot Games are expected to reveal how these teams will be decided upon in the upcoming days – alongside the competition format and key dates for the league.The announcement explains the decision: “Latin America has a diverse and extremely rich culture, but we believe that esports fans share many similarities across the continent. The way in which an Argentine player passionately enjoys a final is not different from the excitement of a Mexican fan to see his favourite team devote champion, and that is reflected in each and every one of the countries that make up the region. Today we believe that dividing efforts, resources and fans into two scenes that share so much is not the best way.”Esports Insider says: Bringing the competitions together with the best teams from both North and South Latin America regions sounds ideal for providing the most competitive experience. Riot Games tried doing it another way and realised it perhaps wasn’t the best way, so we’re looking forward to seeing what they pull out of the bag for this unnamed league.last_img read more

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