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HBS’s Charles Christenson, 80

first_imgCharles J. “Chuck” Christenson, a specialist in managerial accounting and control, died of natural causes at his Cambridge, Mass., home at the age of 80. At the time of his death, he was the Royal Little Professor of Business Administration Emeritus at Harvard Business School (HBS).A member of the active HBS faculty for almost 40 years, Christenson had a distinguished career as an innovator, teacher, and scholar. His research focused on organizations as learning systems, corporate adaptability, and the applications of social sciences to business.“He had a deep intelligence and broad training in the philosophy of science, which encompasses the social, physical, and biological sciences and examines ‘how we know what we know,’” said Baker Foundation Professor Robert S. Kaplan. “Most accounting scholars are familiar with accounting and maybe economics, but Chuck pulled from diverse disciplines to understand management behavior.”He taught the first-year M.B.A. courses in managerial economics and control. He also taught in the Owner/President Management Program for executives and a doctoral seminar on the theory and development of complex systems. He is the author of several books.“Chuck was a brilliant, gifted man, who brought a rigor and ambition to his thinking about the nature of organizations and how you derive truth from theory,” said Regina E. Herzlinger, the Nancy R. McPherson Professor of Business Administration and a former student of Christenson’s.Born on Sept. 25, 1930, in Chicago, Christenson made his first scholarly contribution at the age of only 22. He graduated from Cornell in 1952 and graduated from HBS with high distinction as a Baker Scholar in 1954.A private memorial service will be held in Chicago. Donations in his memory may be sent to Boston Baroque, 68 Leonard Street, Belmont, Mass., 02478.To read the full obituary.last_img read more

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EPA sends $2 million in brownfield clean-up funds to Vermont

first_imgVermont s congressional delegation announced today $2 million in Brownfields grants for the state.  Senators Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) and Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Congressman Peter Welch (D-Vt.) said the Environmental Protection Agency funding, $400,000 of which came from the economic stimulus plan, will go towards clean up of and reinvestment in properties blighted by hazardous waste. The City of Burlington will receive a $200,000 grant; the City of St. Albans will receive $400,000 in cleanup funds, and the New England Youth Theatre in Brattleboro will receive a $200,000 cleanup grant.There are also four regional recipients. The Windham Regional Commission will receive $400,000. The Lamoille County Planning Commission will receive $400,000. The Northwest Regional Planning Commission will receive $200,000. And the Rutland Regional Planning Commission will receive $200,000.The EPA defines a brownfield site as a location where the presence of a hazardous substance may complicate the expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of the property. Cleaning up polluted site takes development pressures off of undeveloped open land.  It also improves and protects the environment.Details of the Vermont grants are available here.  To learn more about the Brownfields program, visit the E.P.A. Web site here.last_img read more

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Fewer Queenslanders applying for mortgages as housing market cools

first_imgFewer Queenslanders are applying for mortgages according to new research.Mr Luffman said the figures could indicate people were turning to credit to support their household and discretionary spending.“Given the current subdued growth in household incomes, and below-neutral consumer sentiment, it is understandable that Australians may be becoming more circumspect in their use of consumer credit products,” he said.Mortgage applications are a good indicator of homebuyer demand and housing turnover.It comes as Brisbane home prices recorded their slowest rate of growth in four years over the past financial year, rising just two per cent, according to CoreLogic. Fewer Queenslanders are applying for home loans according to new data. Picture: Chris PavlichThe finding comes after CoreLogic data revealed the number of homes up for auction across Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Adelaide and Perth fell for the fourth straight week in the seven days to July 16.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home3 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor3 hours agoGET THE LATEST REAL ESTATE NEWS DIRECT TO YOUR INBOX HERENationally, consumer credit demand rose 10.3 per cent in the June quarter, driven mainly by a surge in personal loan applications, according to Equifax’s latest Quarterly Consumer Credit Demand Index.Credit card applications in Queensland rose 4.5 per cent in the three months to June, the second largest increase after Tasmania.Personal loan applications also picked up strongly in Queensland — jumping 19.6 per cent during the quarter.Extreme inner-city renovationDo these five things before you make an offerBuyers with a bad case of FOMO Fewer Queenslanders are applying for home loans, according to new research. Picture: Brendan Radke.FEWER Queenslanders are applying for home loans in another sign the state’s housing market is beginning to cool.Mortgage applications fell 3.4 per cent in Queensland during the June quarter, according to credit reporting agency Equifax.Nationally, home loan applications were down nearly one per cent during the quarter.Equifax senior general manager Angus Luffman said it marks the second consecutive quarter of declining mortgage applications, signalling the start of a “downward trend” in all states.“Any debate about whether the housing market is softening should now be put to rest,” Mr Luffman said.“We can clearly see that, even in the historically strong geographies on the eastern seaboard, mortgage application demand is slowing or already in decline.”last_img read more

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