Tag: 爱上海DC

Hackett , Future Planning Associates merge

first_imgHackett & Company and Future Planning Associates, Inc. MergeWilliston, VT – on November 1, 2004, South Burlington-based Hackett &Company’s retirement plan and administrative group will merge with FuturePlanning Associates, Inc. of Williston, bringing together two of Vermont’sleading retirement consulting and administration firms with over 60 yearsof combined service.The merged company, with a combined staff of 20 “qualified plan”specialists, will operate as Future Planning Associates, Inc. under theleadership of Suzanne Stewart as chairman and Luther F. Hackett as ViceChairman. The other directors of the merged company include Jan Emmons,Marilyn Jae Lehto and Loretta Wood of Future Planning Associates and PattyBarry, Erin Helmken and Daryl Straw from Hackett & Company.”We believe that by combining our two companies we will be able to providethe full array of retirement and benefit planning services andadministration that are required in this increasingly complex field,” saidHackett. “As retirement planning takes on even greater complexity, aswell as importance to individuals and employers, our goal is to providesound advice and practical solutions that meet their needs,” he added.”Outstanding client service is our primary objective,” said Stewart in anoutline of the goals of the merged company. “In the same way that wecreate plans for our clients that are both long-term and future-oriented,this merger will ensure that Future Planning Associates will continue toprovide strength and continuity for the long term. By bringing together abroad array of individual expertise in talented staff and state-of-the-artdata systems, we will provide superior service to all of our clients,”added Stewart.With the November 1st merger, the company will operate in expandedquarters at the current site of Future Planning Associates, Inc. at 600Blair Park (P.O. Box 905) in Williston.Future Planning Associates, Inc. is a regional consulting firmspecializing in the design, implementation and administration oftax-qualified Retirement Plans, Section 125/Cafeteria Plans, HealthReimbursement Arrangements and COBRA requirements.- 30 –last_img read more

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CBS: Tourist activity of the population of the Republic of Croatia in 2017

first_imgIn 2017, 43% of the Croatian population went on private tripsThus, according to the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), in 2017, 1,6 million people or 43,1% of the Croatian population aged 15 and over were on at least one private multi-day trip.A total of 4,1 million private trips were made, of which 2,6 million (62,9%) were in Croatia and 1,5 million (37,1%) abroad. Most people traveled abroad to Bosnia and Herzegovina (20,8%), Italy (11,6%), Germany (10,9%), Austria (9,6%) and Slovenia (9,5%). The most common motives for going on a private multi-day trip are a vacation at sea (1,3 million trips or 32,1%) and a visit to relatives and friends (1,1 million trips or 28,3%).Most nights spent in non-commercial accommodation The population of Croatia made a total of 26,6 million overnight stays on private multi-day trips, of which 17,4 million overnight stays (65,2%) were realized in Croatia and 9,3 million (34,8%) on trips abroad. An average of 6,6 overnight stays were made per trip. On average, 6,8 nights were spent on trips in Croatia and 6,2 nights on trips abroad.According to the type of accommodation, most overnight stays were realized in non-commercial accommodation facilities (18,2 million overnight stays or 68,3%), of which 9,5 million overnight stays were with relatives and friends, and 8,3 million with own houses and holiday flats million overnight stays.Source: CBSThe average cost per trip was 1 kuna Total expenditures on private multi-day trips amounted to HRK 8,0 billion, of which HRK 3,5 billion (43,7%) in Croatia and HRK 4,5 billion (56,3%) abroad. The average cost per trip was 1 kuna.In 2017, 57% of the Croatian population did not travel, mostly for financial reasons In 2017, 2,1 million or 56,9% of the Croatian population aged 15 and over did not travel on private multi-day trips. The most common reasons for not going on private multi-day trips (possibility of multiple answers) were: lack of financial resources (55,2%), health reasons (25,6%) and lack of free time due to family obligations (19,9%).In 2017, 8% of the Croatian population went on business trips In 2017, 301 thousand people or 8,3% of the population of Croatia aged 15 and over were on at least one business multi-day trip. A total of 842 thousand business trips were made, of which 424 thousand trips (50,4%) were in Croatia and 418 thousand (49,6%) abroad.Source: CBS4,3 million day trips made In 2017, the population of Croatia aged 15 and over made 4,3 million one-day trips, of which 3,8 million (88,8%) were private and 485 thousand (11,2%) business.last_img read more

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Merle Norman

first_imgVisitation is Monday, March 4, 2019 from 4 until 7 p.m. at Cook Rosenberger Funeral Home, 929 Main Street, Brookville and again on Tuesday at Scipio United Baptist Church from 10 until 11 a.m.  David Smith will officiate services at 11 a.m. at the church and burial will follow in Mt. Carmel cemetery. He was born June 30, 1947 to Willard and Jeanette “Irene” Norman.  He had two brothers, Willie and Donnie Norman – both surviving, and two sisters, Alma Hill – surviving, and Mable who preceded him in death. On Tuesday, February 26, 2019, Merle Edward Norman woke up being held by Jesus, and was reunited with the love of his life. Merle was retired from Sperry Rubber and Plastic.  He was an avid fisherman and could literally build anything.  He was a devote Christian and loyal member of the Scipio Baptist Church. Anyone who knew Merle, adored him.center_img He will be sincerely missed by his three daughters, Tammy (Danny) Garrison, Lisa (James) Henson, and Anita Norman; six grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; several friends, nieces and nephews.  Besides his parents and siblings, he was preceded in death by his “little lady” Rose Etta Norman; infant granddaughter, Ciera Rose Griffin; sisters-in-law, Ulene Quinlan, Bonnie Barrett and Carolyn Cummins, and brother-in-law, Nelson Barrett. Memorial contributions can be directed to Scipio United Baptist Church.  To leave memories or sign the online guestbook please visit www.cookrosenberger.com.  The staff of Cook Rosenberger Funeral Home is honored to care for the family of Merle Norman.last_img read more

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Is Lane Kiffin beyond a point of maturation?

first_imgTo everyone — the pundit, the avid fan, the man who sells you bacon-wrapped hot dogs on Exposition Boulevard — Lane Kiffin represents a number of things.To some, he’s a perpetual brat.To others, he’s a Trojan prince, leading USC back from NCAA sanctions.Growing up · Though the fourth-youngest head coach in the Football Bowl Subdivision, Kiffin has experienced his share of controversy. – Razan Al Marzouqi | Daily TrojanTruth, in turn, becomes muddied, and it’s understandably challenging to decipher fact from fiction. Just who exactly is the Trojans’ third-year coach? Do the stereotypes stick? Is he actually that arrogant? Is he actually the boy wonder?But answering just yes or no to such sweeping generalities would be dishonest and unfair. I can’t pretend to respond to either, exactly. Many of us cover Lane Kiffin, but how many of us truly know Lane Kiffin on any sort of personal level?I have interacted with him enough to express a few opinions confidently. For starters, I’ve found him to be thoughtful and calculated — he doesn’t do or say things for the sake of simply doing or saying them. And two, he carries a better sense of humor than he’s given credit for. I like that.But as many will inevitably point out, that doesn’t mean his record is spotless.More or less, he comes across as incredibly stubborn.This is one flaw that has been accentuated in recent weeks, as USC stumbled at Stanford, 21-14, and four days later, he infamously stormed out of a press conference after 29 seconds following a question about the return of an injured player.“Kiffin is a talented, aggressive recruiter and a decent football strategist whose spoiled-brat arrogance constantly undermines his efforts to become a great coach,” wrote Grantland’s Shane Ryan last month. “He stretches rules, misreads interpersonal situations, and issues the wrong kind of challenges to his enemies. People excuse these as the follies of youth, but that’s a cop-out; they’re the follies of character, and maturity isn’t always related to age.”Yup, there are flaws. Ryan chooses the term “spoiled-brat arrogance,” which leans toward hyperbole but is unmistakably rooted in reality. Football coaches tend to be stubborn-minded, petty people. They’re often micromanagers. And Kiffin is a football coach, after all.But the funny thing is, No. 13 USC reversing course this season and meeting its Coliseum-sized preseason expectations largely hinges on whether Kiffin, 37, can still grow as a coach and become less stubborn, and more mature.Friday indicated this might be possible.Toward the end of his team’s bye-week practice at Howard Jones Field, Kiffin, fielding questions from a smaller contingent of reporters, at last admitted a rather obvious but important point. As the team’s offensive play caller, he called a subpar game in USC’s mid-September road loss to Stanford — in case anyone wasn’t aware.“You’d love to have it back but you can’t,” he said. “In coaching, you’re just like players. Every game is not the same. You’re going to have some games where you make some better calls and get in a rhythm. I didn’t feel like I did really well in that game with our players.”He took blame, and it was refreshing.What makes this noteworthy is that it was a public admission. For a while now, Kiffin has received a substantial amount of criticism for a failure to take ownership — at least publicly — for events that have transpired during his tenure, including the Stanford game. Usually, he has deferred, highlighting a particular play or circumstance.But Friday’s admission suggests a lot.It suggests the “arrogant” coach might be open to honest, self-evaluation. It suggests the coach is receptive to criticism. It suggests the coach can still reflect and look to better himself.That said, none of the aforementioned possibilities might be true. But I want to be fair and at least give him that chance. Cynicism shouldn’t be our guiding principle. As much time as we’ve invested in thinking about Kiffin, he still hasn’t reached the age of 40 and has only been a head coach for a total of 62 games.That’s relatively young, which begs the question whether he has room to grow.The Trojans’ success over the remaining two-thirds of the season will be tied to his ability — or inability — to do so. “The 19th Hole” runs Tuesdays. If you would like to comment on this story, visit DailyTrojan.com or email Joey at [email protected]last_img read more

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