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Student Peace Conference strives to promote peace-building initiatives

first_imgThe annual Notre Dame Student Peace Conference, a Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies sponsored event, took place Friday and Saturday at the Hesburgh Center to encourage students to have discussions about peace-building and social justice.The conference was organized by senior co-chairs Elizabeth Hascher and Erin Prestage, who said they have been planning the event since September.“Something that’s hard when you plan anything this big is that you have to rely on other people,” Hascher said. “There were some bumps along the way, but ultimately we had so much help from our professors, our advisors [and] the other students on the committee who showed up early and stayed after we told them go home.” Photo courtesy of Elizabeth Hascher Professors, advisors and co-chairs present at the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies’ annual Student Peace Conference. The conference took place April 13 – 14 and was themed ’Toward Just Peace.‘In addition to professors and advisors, the co-chairs said they worked with students who were part of the academic committee, hospitality committee or publicity committee.“I think with any event it’s always challenging because obviously not everyone is going to be as excited as we are because we spent the last eight months working towards this,” Prestage said. “I definitely think our committee members rose to the occasion and made sure that what we envisioned the conference to be like not only would go that way but would go so much better.”This year’s theme was ‘Toward Just Peace,’ a topic chosen by Hascher and Prestage, they said, because of its applicability to other areas of interest outside of peace.“We were hoping to get more presentations and papers talking about the intersections between justice and peace,” Hascher said. “We had felt that this was something that can be overlooked in a lot of conversations because sometimes justice and peace are not necessarily compatible, and we want to challenge people to think about getting to a place where they are.”The universal nature of their theme attracted a more diverse group of students to the conference this year, Prestage said.“I think our theme was so inclusive towards justice rather than just different ways of peace, which is what it has been in the past,” Prestage said. “It focused a little bit more on the compatibility between the two themes; I think it welcomed a lot more majors that otherwise wouldn’t really be interested in just a conference about peace.”Hascher and Prestage said that although the conference’s goal was to promote discussion about issues related to justice and peace, they hoped it would accomplish more than conversations.“It’s one thing for us to have these conversations, but we’re really hoping that people will feel compelled to go out and do something,” Hascher said. “Because if we’re just talking about it, if we’re not actually doing something, we’re not showing up, we’re not speaking out, we’re not protesting and organizing and generally engaging with experiences of violence, we kind of lose the point.”The highlight of the weekend for Hascher and Prestage, they said, was their keynote speaker Alexis Templeton, an activist who they discovered in the documentary “Whose Streets?” when the Center for Social Concerns sponsored a screening of it last semester.“Their presentation exceeded all my hopes for this conference,” Prestage said. “They really provided a wake-up call to everyone who was at the conference to that fact that words only mean so much if you’re not showing up and actually putting action to what you’re talking about.”Tags: Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, peace building, Social justice, Student Peace Conferencelast_img read more

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Homegrown herbs

first_imgSpaghetti sauce would be lost without oregano. Salsa just wouldn’t be the same without cilantro. Rosemary chicken would just be, well, chicken without rosemary.All these dishes are made possible by herbs that can be grown in home gardens.Herbs “are actually fairly easy to grow in Georgia,” said Paul Thomas, a University of Georgia horticulturalist. “We have the perfect temperature, the perfect sunlight and acceptable humidity. As long as you do the appropriate soil adjustments, herbs can be excellent garden plants to grow.”Many herbs originated in the Mediterranean’s sandy, well-draining soil, not the hard-packed red clay encasing much of Georgia. To make herbs happy here, most gardeners need to add a few soil amendments and plant in pots or spots in their gardens that drain well.Thomas manages well-drained soil in his potted herbs by adding lots of sand and compost to the soil. He also plants herbs that spread easily, like mint and oregano, in containers.Out in the garden, Thomas digs a long trench two feet deep and fills it with thoroughly mixed compost, sand and native soil. In it he plants herbs that need a large root system, like fennel, rosemary and dill.“The goal is to make sure when it rains or I irrigate, the water goes right through the soil and does not accumulate where the roots are,” Thomas said. “South Georgians will actually have to add more compost to the sand.”Thomas’ favorite herbs are mint, basil, chives and rosemary. He adds mint to sweet tea, basil to turkey stuffing, pizza and salads and chives to soups, hamburgers and potatoes au gratin.Although rosemary is one of his favorites, Thomas warns that rosemary shrubs can grow quite large. Even small plants can spread to three or four-feet wide.Perennial herbs include rosemary, chives, oregano, marjoram and mint. Cilantro and parsley are annual herbs. Dill can be biennial.To master herb growing, Thomas says follow these 10 rules:1. Herbs do not like to sit in wet soil. An easy way to keep them happy is to plant them in a raised bed. Because the soil is above ground, it will drain very easily.2. Water herbs thoroughly when they start flagging. They will tolerate drought but their flavors won’t be as strong. Never allow herbs to go more than two weeks without water.3. Always plant herbs in full sun. If either their leaves or the soil doesn’t dry out after a rain, they will become more susceptible to diseases.4. Never crowd an herb garden. Plant herbs a foot apart so air can move between the plants.5. Never apply full strength fertilizers. If the package says 1 pound per 100 square feet, use half. Fertilizer minimally – once at the beginning of the growing season, four weeks later and then again another four weeks later after four weeks (about July). Follow treatments with a thorough watering.6. Always harvest herbs in the morning. The cut surfaces of herbs need to be bone dry by mid afternoon or disease will take over.7. Use a hose, not pesticides. If you find bugs on your herbs at 7 a.m., use a water hose and apply a spray from the side. The sideways water stream will wash the bugs off, and most never get a chance to return.8. Leave the black and green and yellow striped caterpillars on fennel and dill. They are black swallowtail caterpillars. Keeping the larva on fennel will result in butterflies later in the summer.9. Don’t let weeds crowd herbs out. This includes grasses as herbs cannot compete with them.10. Never mulch herbs with leaves or other debris. Winter-mulched herbs do not survive well. Thomas’ herbs survive over winter because he rakes all the leaves out of his herb garden.“You’ll find the more you use herbs, the more you treasure them,” Thomas said.last_img read more

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10 Quick Summer Energy Saving Tips From Thurston Energy

first_imgFacebook11Tweet0Pin0 Many Thurston County residents worship the sun.  We live for the days of a bright yellow sunshine in the five-day forecast.  To see a string of days without rain clouds is certainly a treat.When the temperature rises, there are some new behaviors that you can incorporate into your daily habits.  These easy-to-implement tasks can reduce your energy bills.Install a programmable thermostat that brings your house to a comfortable temperature when you are typically at home and stops heating or cooling your living space when you tend to be out.If your home has a central air conditioning, set the temperature to cool at 78 degrees.  Home owners typically save about six to seven percent off cooling costs for each degree above 78 degrees.Pull window shades.  Our neighbors in Southern California know to close blinds on sunny days, but people living in the Pacific Northwest sometimes forget that to keep the hot sun out, you need to pull the shades.  Open the shades in the winter to bring in warm rays.Turn off lights, appliances and electronics when not in use.  During a Washington summer, we benefit from long hours of daylight.  Take advantage of this natural light and leave the lights off.  This step will keep your house cooler and your energy bill down.If the hot weather is too much, look for an Energy Star air conditioner.  This designation means that the cooling unit is the most energy efficient model on the market.  Situate a window air conditioner out of direct sunlight.  They work best when kept cool.Replace an old central air conditioner with a new Energy Star qualified model.  Often this can reduce your cooling costs by up to 20%.  Schedule an inspection to make sure that your heating and cooling system is working at peak efficiency.Install a ceiling fan.  This is a less expensive way to cool down.  During hot weather, a ceiling fan will create a cool breeze and circulate air around your home.Get rid of hot air by using an exhaust fan to blow hot air out of your kitchen.  Similarly, take cooler showers and baths to avoid adding hot, humid aid to your home.Cook outside.  Instead of using your oven or stove, use your barbecue, microwave or countertop appliances.  A microwave uses 75% less energy than a regular electric oven.Install Energy Star compact fluorescent (CF) light bulbs in your most used fixtures and lamps.  CF bulbs radiate less heat and will save you an average of $30 – $40 over the lifespan of each bulb.For more examples of how to reduce your heating bills and improve your home’s energy efficiency, click here.last_img read more

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Olympia Orthopaedic Changes in Operations Due to COVID-19

first_imgTo our valued patients, Facebook187Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by Olympia Orthopaedic Associates Finally, we want toacknowledge that arranging for care and surgery is a big deal and we don’t takethe need to cancel lightly.  We are inuncharted territory right now as a community and country.  Oly Ortho would like to err on the side ofcaution.  Our patients, staff, andcommunity are of utmost importance to us. Should you have questions, pleaserefer to our website at www.olyortho.com for updates on our COVID-19 response. It is clear that hospitalsare being taxed with critically ill patients, and this is only going toincrease in the near future.  They arerunning out of space AND are tight on supplies. In addition, with school closures, many of our staff are unable to comeinto our facilities to work.  In order tohelp keep the hospital focused on their priority and to help limit ourconsumption of necessary safety supplies, Oly Ortho will be taking thefollowing steps: William Peterson, M.D.,Managing Partnercenter_img No doubt you are aware of the current situation in Washington state concerning the COVID-19, or coronavirus, pandemic. As partners in this community, Oly Ortho feels it is vitally important to evaluate our operations in the best interest of our patients, our staff, and our community. Sincerely, All elective cases at the hospitalswill be cancelled, per their notification to us.  Our surgeons will remain available to helpwith trauma and emergent cases in the hospital as those needs arise.At our surgery center, we will bemoving up urgent cases to high priority and getting them in as soon aspossible.  This means that if you have anelective surgery scheduled in our surgery center, your case may be cancelleduntil we are able to reschedule to a later date.Our clinics will be ramping up ourcapability to do more telemedicine visits so that patients do not need tounnecessarily come into a busy clinic.Patients will be screened prior toentering the clinic to look for symptoms or COVID-19 risk factors, includingtaking of temperature.Our clinics will be triaging appointmentsto limit the number of patients coming into our clinics.Non-urgent new patient may be askedto wait until our resources have increased.Our Rapid Orthopaedic Clinic (ROC)will remain open to alleviate ortho patients needing to go to the Emergency Roomwhile they are already being stretched. If you have an acute injury that needs to be attended to, please call 360-754-7622to be triaged prior to coming in.  Wealso may be able to treat some injuries via telemedicine. Ben Shah, CEOlast_img read more

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