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Great War left an enduring legacy across Harvard

first_img Additional Veterans Day events Harvard Law School Thursday, 4 p.m. — Disabled American Veterans Distinguished Speaker Series: Chief Judge Robert N. Davis, U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims, WCC 2036 Milstein East B, Harvard Law School. Harvard Graduate School of Education Thursday, 2-3 p.m. — Veterans and Servicemembers Virtual Information Session. Prospective students will have a chance hear from and ask questions of an admission liaison and financial aid representative in addition to current HGSE students who are veterans and servicemembers. Register online to receive a login: https://apply.gse.harvard.edu/register/military2018 U.S. Army Cpl. Arthur Briggs Church, 32, was killed on a French battlefield during an attack on Germany’s fortified Hindenburg Line on Sept. 28, 1918.Marine Lt. Carleton Burr, 26, was leading his men in an advance on the battlefields of Picardie, France, when he was struck and killed by shrapnel on Sept. 20, 1918.And in the skies over Chamery, France, on Bastille Day 1918, Lt. Quentin Roosevelt, the 20-year-old son of President Theodore Roosevelt, was shot down and killed in a dogfight with a flock of German planes.Church, Burr, and Roosevelt, who all died in the final months of World War I, are just three of the 372 students, alumni and faculty whose names are engraved on the granite walls of the Memorial Room in Harvard’s Memorial Church.The Great War left an enduring legacy on the Harvard campus. The Memorial Church, its bell, and the Memorial Room are all testaments to the sense of loss the University community felt in its wake.“The Memorial Room commemorates the Harvard men who died in World War I, and to whom the church is dedicated,” said Edward Elwyn Jones, Gund University organist and choirmaster. “The Memorial Church holds such a prominent place on Harvard’s campus, and it is first a church dedicated to peace, but also to sacrifice. I think it is wonderful for us, especially this year, to be mindful of that sacrifice.”,Over the next several weeks, Memorial Church will commemorate the 100th anniversary of the end of the war with a series of performances featuring the music and composers of the era. The performances, which will all take place in the church sanctuary, are free and open to the public.Friday, noon — Uppsala University Chamber Ensemble musicians and French pianist Paul André Bempéchat present a concert of chamber music by Swedish romantic composers, including Wilhelm Peterson-Berger, Dag Wirén, André Chini, Christer Hermansson, and Gunnar de Frumerie.Saturday, 7:30 p.m. — Massachusetts vocalists Deborah Selig and David McFerrin and pianist Clifton J. Nobel present “Angel Spirits: Music of World War I.”Sunday, 4 p.m. — Harvard University Choir Concert, “Remembering,” featuring the music of Lili Boulanger and Charles Hubert Hastings Parry and the U.S. premiere of a new choral piece, “In Flanders Fields,” by Gareth Treseder.Friday, 9 a.m.‒noon; Saturday, 8 a.m.‒7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 1 p.m.‒4 p.m. — Exhibition of the wartime etchings of Alphege Brewer.Dec 4, 8 p.m. — The Tactus Ensemble, “Songs of Farewell.”The concerts offer a teaching moment about the war’s impact. The carnage decimated a generation, including its artists. The English composer Parry, for example, lost many of his former students, Jones said.“I talk a certain amount to our students about the history of the war itself, but also the artistic endeavors and reactions to the war,” he said. “Many artists and musicians fought during the war and many lost their lives. But the ones who were left behind were deeply affected by it. Parry’s reactions to the war are very visceral and we hear that in the music.” That deep sense of loss and sacrifice also permeates the Memorial Church, which was dedicated in 1932 to honor those in the Harvard community killed in World War I.Inscribed at the top of the wall of the Memorial Room are the words of Harvard President A. Lawrence Lowell, who also donated the church’s bell: “While a bright future beckoned, they freely gave their lives and fondest hopes for us and our allies that we might learn from them courage in peace to spend our lives making a better world for others.”The Memorial Church recognizes the service and sacrifice of all Harvard veterans, especially during Veterans Day weekend. The walls of the sanctuary are dedicated to more than 1,000 members of the Harvard community who died in World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War.,The Rev. Jonathan L. Walton, Plummer Professor of Christian Morals and Pusey Minister in the Memorial Church, said every time he steps into the church sanctuary and the Memorial Room he is reminded of the words of the Rev. Phillips Brooks, the longtime rector of Boston’s Trinity Church and namesake of Harvard’s Phillips Brooks House.“‘How carefully most men creep into nameless graves, when occasionally one or two forget themselves into immortality,’ Brooks wrote,” Walton said. “Etched on the walls are the names of men and women who were able to live a life that was worth living because they found a cause and a purpose greater than themselves. We continue to honor their service, their sacrifice, and their memory.”On Sunday, members of Harvard ROTC will speak at the Faith & Life Forum at 9:30 a.m. in the Buttrick Room. The Commemoration of Benefactors and of the War Dead will take place during the Sunday Service beginning at 11 a.m. Former Massachusetts Gov. Deval L. Patrick will preach. The church will also be open on Veterans Day from 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Morning Prayers, which begin at 8:30 a.m., will feature U.S. Army veteran Richard Martinez ’21.last_img read more

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U.S. Reserves Right To Meet Cyber Attack With Force

first_imgBy Dialogo November 17, 2011 The United States reserves the right to retaliate with military force against a cyber attack and is working to sharpen its ability to track down the source of any breach, the Pentagon said in a report made public on Tuesday, November 15. The 12-page report to Congress, mandated by the 2011 Defense Authorization Act, was one of the clearest statements to date of U.S. cybersecurity policy and the role of the military in the event of a computer-borne attack. “When warranted, we will respond to hostile attacks in cyberspace as we would to any other threat to our country,” the report said. “We reserve the right to use all necessary means – diplomatic, informational, military and economic – to defend our nation, our allies, our partners and our interests.” Hostile acts, it said, could include “significant cyber attacks directed against the U.S. economy, government or military” and the response could use electronic means or more conventional military options. Cyberspace is a particularly challenging domain for the Pentagon. Defense Department employees operate more than 15,000 computer networks with 7 million computers at hundreds of locations around the world. Their networks are probed millions of times a day and penetrations have caused the loss of thousands of files. The report said the Defense Department was attempting to deter aggression in cyberspace by developing effective defenses that prevent adversaries from achieving their objectives and by finding ways to make attackers pay a price for their actions. “Should the ‘deny objectives’ element of deterrence not prove adequate,” the report said, “DoD (Department of Defense) maintains, and is further developing, the ability to respond militarily in cyberspace and in other domains.” Key to a military response is being able to quickly identify the source of an attack, particularly challenging due to the anonymous nature of the Internet, the report said. In an effort to crack that problem, the Pentagon is supporting research focusing on tracing the physical source of an attack and using behavior-based algorithms to assess the likely identity of an attacker, the report said. U.S. security agencies also are grooming a cadre of highly skilled cyber forensics experts and are working with international partners to share information in a timely manner about cyber threats, including malicious code and the people behind it, it said. Before moving to offensive action, the United States would exhaust all other options, weigh the risk of action against the cost of inaction and “act in a way that reflects our values and strengthens our legitimacy, seeking broad international support wherever possible,” the report said.last_img read more

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Distance makes for a unique tradition

first_imgRivalries make college football special.Coaches, players and fans alike circle one or two games on their calendar each year as “must-win” games — not because of rankings or standings, but out of a longstanding and passionate dislike for another school. For some, it would be OK if their team lost every other game if only they beat that school.The names really say it all. Every year, Pittsburgh and West Virginia throw down in the Backyard Brawl. Utah and BYU wage an annual Holy War. Georgia and Georgia Tech engage in Clean, Old-Fashioned Hate.Whether between teams in the same conference, the same state or even the same city, almost all of college football’s rivalries share a common bond: They make geographic sense.USC’s rivalry with Notre Dame stands out because of how seemingly random it is: 2,103 miles separate Notre Dame Stadium from the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. The teams have never played in the same conference — Notre Dame football has seen no need for conference affiliation at all. What then does a Catholic school of fewer than 12,000 students in northern Indiana have in common with a secular institution of 36,000 grads and undergrads in the heart of the nation’s second-largest media market?The origin of the rivalry is equally odd. Gwynn Wilson, USC’s equivalent to an athletic director in 1925, went with his wife to Lincoln, Neb., in November of that year to spend Thanksgiving watching Notre Dame play the Nebraska Cornhuskers.The Trojans themselves were in the midst of an 11-2 season in which they played all but one game at the Coliseum and were searching for a more nationally prominent rival. The Fighting Irish were a prime candidate, having gone undefeated the previous season, which was capped off by a 27-10 victory over Stanford in the 1925 Rose Bowl.At this point, the line between truth and fiction begins to blur. Legendary Notre Dame coach Knute Rockne — whose life inspired the movie Knute Rockne, All American, starring, among others, Ronald Reagan — is said to have been reluctant to agree to an annual series with the Trojans because of the long-distance travel required.That’s when the women stepped in. Wilson’s wife got to chatting with Rockne’s wife and convinced her that a biannual trip to the sunny West Coast was an improvement upon the usual pilgrimage to freezing Nebraska.Naturally, Rockne was convinced by his wife, and the teams squared off for the first time ever in Los Angeles the following December. This Saturday the Trojans and Irish will play for the 83rd time in their history.It’s not just the distance between the schools, however, that makes the series unique. Notre Dame fills its schedule each year with games against teams from coast to coast because it doesn’t belong to a conference.In the 1980s, for example, the Trojans’ were far from the Irish’s most fearsome opponents. USC didn’t win a single game against Notre Dame from 1983 through 1995. Meanwhile, the Irish went to nine major bowl games during that span and won the 1988 national title.The games Notre Dame fans most looked forward to then were the team’s showdowns with the Miami Hurricanes, which reached their dramatic peak in the 1988 game dubbed “Catholics vs. Convicts,” featuring a pre-game brawl between the teams. The series was called off two years later, however, and was only renewed again last year in the Sun Bowl.The longevity of the USC-Notre Dame series, along with its prominence on the national stage, is what sets it apart.The two programs have won a combined 22 national championships (11 each) and 14 Heisman trophies (seven each). They’ve had more players drafted into the NFL (USC is first with 472, Notre Dame second with 469) than any other school. Both are in the top eight in all-time winning percentage.The series has produced some of the best moments in the history of college football.Notre Dame fans fondly recall the 1988 game in which the No. 1 Irish beat the No. 2 Trojans 27-10 in Los Angeles on their way to the program’s last national championship.The 1977 “Green Jersey Game” is also a happy memory for the Golden Domers. That year Notre Dame wore its traditional blue uniforms during warmups before switching clothes and charging out of the tunnel in special green jerseys followed by a giant Trojan horse. Led by quarterback Joe Montana, the Irish won 49-19.USC supporters can claim “The Comeback” from 1974, in which the Trojans trailed 24-0 with 10 seconds remaining in the first half and rallied to win 55-24. Running back Anthony Davis scored four of his 11 career touchdowns against Notre Dame in that game.More recently, Matt Leinart converted a 4th-and-9 pass to Dwayne Jarrett at Notre Dame Stadium in 2005 on the Trojans’ dramatic late drive. Leinart won the game with a one-yard quarterback sneak on the famous “Bush Push” play, giving the Trojans a 34-31 victory.It’s moments like those that make USC and Notre Dame’s rivalry stand out as truly special. “Sellin’ the Sizzle” runs Wednesdays. To comment on this article, visit dailytrojan.com or email Jonathan at [email protected]last_img read more

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Biological Systems Provide Infinite Design Inspiration

first_imgIt’s not likely engineers and biologists will run out of inspiration from biology anytime soon.  The source is infinite.We start with a quote from a commentary in PNAS by Michael H. Bartl about work on “butterfly inspired photonics” that applies to all bio-inspired research.  The word “design” is key to the story:Biological systems have been an infinite reservoir of inspiration ever since humans started to develop tools and machinery. Just as early scientists and engineers attempted to mimic birds and fish in the development of flying machines and submarines, today, new technologies find their inspiration from biology, such as gecko feet, antireflective eye lenses, iridescent insects, and water-repellant surfaces. Incorporating biological systems and concepts into technological design can happen in several ways: inspiration, mimicking, and replication. In the latter, entire organisms or body parts are directly used, and their structural features are replicated into another compound. Examples include 3D photonic crystals from iridescent beetle scales or antireflective microlens arrays from insect eyes. In contrast, in bioinspiration and biomimicry, a biological function or activity—rather than the organism itself—is converted into an artificial, human-made material or device. In PNAS, England et al. report an optical micrograting array inspired by a photonic structure found in iridescently colored butterfly wings. The authors demonstrate a micrograting array that not only mimics the unique diffraction properties of the biological structure with reversed color-order sequence, but also can be designed to tune these optical properties.Here’s more news about some of the latest applications coming out of biomimetics research.  The first examples show that robotics is especially keen on biological solutions.Inchworm robot :  “Robot that moves like an inchworm could go places other robots can’t” (PhysOrg).  Made in South Korea, it’s “simple, lightweight, and quiet.”  It may be useful for “rescue and reconnaissance missions, but also as a potential material for smart structures and wearable devices.”Muscle bots : “‘Muscles’ Triggered by Electricity Could Power Tiny Robots” (Live Science). Fibers that expand and contract like muscles could lead to electronics that could automatically rewire themselves—even though the force in the  artificial material is 1,000 times weaker than the power of human muscle.Downhill gecko robots : “What Goes Up Must Come Down: Biologists at UC Riverside show that geckos alter foot orientation during downhill locomotion” (UC Riverside). No one has really figured out how geckos move downhill till these scientists studied it.  They found that the forelimbs act as brakes, the hind limbs as stabilizers.  “The research has applications in robotics, specifically in how robots can be designed to move up and down complicated surfaces.”  Incidentally, geckos on the Australasia side of the Wallace Line grow about twice as big, PhysOrg reports, but scientists as yet do not know why, other than differences in predators.Bird bots :  “Running robots of future may learn from world’s best two-legged runners: birds” (Oregon State U). “Although birds are designed primarily for flight, scientists have learned that species that predominately live on land and scurry around on the ground are also some of the most sophisticated runners of any two-legged land animals.”  They’re even better than humans at leaping over obstacles without losing their speed or focus.  “The running robots of the future are going to look a lot less robotic,” robotics expert Jonathan Hurst said. “They will be more fluid, like the biological systems in nature. We’re not necessarily trying to copy animals, but we do want to match their capabilities.”Sparkling silver fish LED reflectors :  “Mechanism behind nature’s sparkles revealed” (BBC News). The silvery colors seen in schools of sardines and herring are due to disordered arrays of nanoscopic crystals in the scales that exploit light.  This is also true in unrelated species, like beetles, butterfly wings and birds.  Dr. Nicholas Roberts likes looking at nature for ideas we  never thought of; this is why he finds science exciting.  “He added that the structures could be copied to produce highly reflective surfaces to, for example, manufacture reflectors to make LED lights more efficient.”Why sea turtles are plump : “Plump turtles swim better: First models of swimming animals” (University of Wisconsin-Madison).  Modeling a biological system often precedes application.  Engineers at U of Wisconsin were surprised to find that plump turtles swam better than lean ones.  “We can literally design animals now and ask how are they going to function, just like a car or a rocket ship,” researcher Warren Porter said.Bird feather anti-turbulence : “Feathers in flight inspire anti-turbulence technology” (RMIT University).  Inspiration from feathers has “great potential for all sizes of aircraft and could not only reduce the effects of turbulence on passengers but also reduce loads on plane wings, leading to lower fatigue and hence longer life.”Ant electronics : “Ant behavior might shed insight on problems facing electronics design” (PhysOrg). “The swarm-intelligent framework at the heart of [Michael] Hsiao’s approach [at Virginia Tech] is based on long-term research he has conducted using algorithms that simulate the methods used by ant colonies to find the most efficient route to food sources.”Beetle wing deployable structures : “Asymmetric hindwing foldings in rove beetles” (PNAS).  “Rove beetles are known to fold their wings in the most complicated and sophisticated ways that have right–left asymmetric patterns. This asymmetric folding can confer both high deployment capability and high storage efficiency, and therefore has a great deal of potential for engineering applications.”  Examples include “design possibilities for all deployable structures, from space structures to articles of daily use.”Beetle anti-counterfeit ink : “Longhorn beetle inspires ink to fight counterfeiting” (PhysOrg). The longhorn beetle can shift its color from red to black and back again.  Inspired by this feat, Chinese researchers have designed “responsive colloidal photonic crystals” into ink that would make money difficult to counterfeit.  And it’s not just for cash: designing controllable, responsive optical properties “is of great promise for developing advanced responsive … devices such as anticounterfeiting devices, multifunctional microchips, sensor arrays, or dynamic displays.”DNA cancer-fighting package : “Bio-inspired ‘nano-cocoons’ offer targeted drug delivery against cancer cells” (PhysOrg).  At U of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, “Biomedical engineering researchers have developed a drug delivery system consisting of nanoscale “cocoons” made of DNA that target cancer cells and trick the cells into absorbing the cocoon before unleashing anticancer drugs.”Parakeet drones : “Bird brains may help drones fly and avoid crashing” (PhysOrg). Starlings fly in formation, but so do budgerigars or budgies (what American consumers call parakeets). “Birds have a remarkable ability to fly through complex environments with incredible speed, rarely colliding.” That inspired tests with budgies in tunnels to see how they avoided objects. The study “has the potential for helping the design of navigation and guidance systems for autonomous drones – especially when you have a flock of delivery drones” like those Google and FedEx want to use to deliver packages to customers.  The article includes the famous video clip of a peregrine falcon at high speed and a goshawk navigating rapidly and flawlessly between trees in the forest.Protein carbon capture : “Inspired by nature, scientists design protein-esque molecules to lock up carbon dioxide” (PhysOrg).  Seashells capture dissolved carbon dioxide in the water through the use of specialized proteins.  Engineers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are using rational design to make “peptoids” (highly stable protein-like molecules), then “are studying the ability of peptoids to assemble into porous materials and mimic protein membranes in filtering out desired targets, such as carbon dioxide.”A-peeling food storage : “The Elixir of Life for Produce: Reducing waste by extending the life of produce” (National Geographic).  The Apeel Corporation is taking cues from the peelings of fruits and vegetables that reduce spoilage.  Keeping produce fresh twice as long would appeal to anyone with food in the frig.  With their new products Apeel, Edipeel and Florapeel coming to market, “Who says bioengineering isn’t romantic?” the article quips.Dog bomb sniffers : “Billions Have Been Spent on Technology to Find IEDs, but Dogs Still Do It Better” (National Geographic). Here’s a nature feat that engineers have not been able to copy yet.  As you remember soldiers on Veteran’s Day, don’t forget their canine companions.  “These working dogs have saved countless soldiers’ lives—and helped prevent PTSD.”  (Note: PhysOrg reports that fruit flies are also good bomb sniffers.)These are things the “Bioneers” have a jump on (see 10/29/05).  You’re missing out because you didn’t think of it first.  But don’t be dismayed; if there is truly an “infinite reservoir of inspiration” in biological systems, you can start looking around your yard right now for a creature to learn about.  Then find out how it solved a real world problem, figure out the principles, create an invention, obtain a patent, start a company, and make a lot of money – while helping humanity.  Did Darwinism ever give you that kind of inspiration?  (Answer: no.  It inspired things like genocide and world wars.)  Design science is on a roll, improving the world.  Nowhere is the contrast between the good fruit of good science and the evil fruit of bad science more apparent than in the contrast between evolution and biomimetics.  “You will know them by their fruits” Francis Bacon said.  Guess where he got that proverb. 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Colourful Qantas kits showcase Aussie artists.

first_imgBreak out your Jerry Garcia ties — they won’t be out of place when Australian carrier Qantas hands out colourful new international business class amenity kits from the start of May.The Australian carrier has selected 16 works from some of Australia’s leading artists, photographers and digital influencers to give passengers collectible pieces to take home.  Amenity kits have a myriad of post-flight uses so it’s not unusual for passengers to take the bags with them.The sixteen amenity kits – eight each for men and women — feature names such as Fairy Bread, 7000 Ironbarks and Maaate.They include pop culture, photography, fine art, abstract landscape, Indigenous art and textile design.Two designs will launch every few months.“As the national carrier, we’re pleased to support talented Aussies telling uniquely Australian stories through their artwork and share them with a global audience,” Qantas group executive brand, marketing & corporate Affairs Olivia Wirth said.“Along with inflight pyjamas, we know amenity kits are an important part of the international Business class experience. Customers love the functionality of our kits and many use them after their flight as make-up bags, an evening clutch or to carry their mobile phones. So, the exposure is broad.”The airline’s support for the arts includes a joint acquisition program for contemporary Australian art with Sydney’s Museum of Contemporary Art and Tate in the UK as well as support for organisations such as the National Gallery of Australia, Opera Australia, Australian Ballet and Bangarra Dance Theatre.last_img read more

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Ravena on scare vs Thais: ‘We didn’t expect we would play that bad’

first_imgRobredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo MOST READ Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Ravena on scare vs Thais: ‘We didn’t expect we would play that bad’6.1K viewsSportsVentuno Web Player 4.51 SEA Games 7: Things to watch out for with PH women’s volleyball team Pagasa: Storm intensifies as it nears PAR Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side LATEST STORIES Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesterscenter_img “We expected that Thailand would put up a fight, but we didn’t expect that we would play that bad,” said guard Kiefer Ravena Monday at Sunway Putra Hotel here. “It was an ugly one for us but we ended up winning and that was the end goal.”CONTRIBUTED PHOTOThailand managed to take a 71-69 lead midway through the fourth and it needed the late-game heroics of Ravena and Baser Amer to lead the Philippines to the victory.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingGilas went on an 8-0 run to take a 77-71 lead with the backcourt tandem scoring six points in the pivotal spurt.Ravena said that if ever they plan to win the Philippines’ record 17th gold medal in the regional games, they have to be sharp from the get-go down to avoid playing catchup. KUALA LUMPUR—Gilas Pilipinas barely left MABA Stadium the same way it came in.Southeast Asia’s most dominant basketball program had to fight tooth-and-nail against Thailand to capture an 81-74 win at the start of the 2017 Southeast Asian Games basketball tournament.ADVERTISEMENT Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ “I guess we have to avoid things like these from happening again,” said Ravena, who finished with 11 points but shot 4-of-14 from the field. Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games PLAY LIST 03:07PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games05:25PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games00:50Trending Articles03:04Filipino athletes share their expectations for 2019 SEA Games00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics02:25PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:36Manny Pacquiao part of 2019 SEA Games opening ceremony Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul View commentslast_img read more

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