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Week-long game returns to campus

first_imgNerf gun? Check. Balled-up socks? Check. Orange armband? Check. The moderated tag game “Humans vs. Zombies” (HvZ) is back for its fifth annual session at Notre Dame. Senior Alex Muench, the game’s primary moderator, has helped run the event hosted by WVFI radio station since Notre Dame’s first game in the spring of 2011. “I’d say it’s a week long game of team-based tag. With Nerf and zombies,” Muench said.  The game involves campus-wide strategy and is played at colleges throughout the United States. According to the rules listed on the game’s website, everyone who signs up to play is automatically registered as “human” and is distinguished by an orange armband tied around his or her arm. When the “Original Zombie” tags the first “human,” he or she becomes “infected” and must play on the “zombie” side, the website stated.To protect themselves, some humans buy large Nerf guns or carry socks. If they “kill” one of the zombies, they earn a 15-minute time out. Zombies hit with a projectile must move their bands down to their neck to show they’re inactive and cannot “feed” on other humans, the website stated.There are also missions every night when the humans come out to complete tasks that can create more safe zones for humans to hide from zombies or earn longer time-out times to prevent zombies from attacking. It all comes down to a huge showdown on Sunday night: If any humans are left standing at the end of the mission, humans win, the website stated. Despite the formulaic procedure, Muench said every game is unique. “What really makes a difference is the players,” said. “A small sub-group of friends can gain notoriety and change the course of the game this semester. And that’s what always makes things interesting.” Into its third year at Notre Dame, HvZ is closing in on just over 150 players. This year’s game runs from Sept. 25 to Sept. 29.  The game is open to all students at Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross.  Sign-ups are accepted until Sept. 21 and can be accessed at www.hvzsource.com/nd. Contact Charmagne Solomon at [email protected]last_img read more

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ND seniors receive fellowships, grants

first_imgThirteen students from the class of 2015 have received fellowships this year from prestigious programs such as the Fulbright U.S. Student Program and the National Science Foundation, Dr. Jeffrey Thibert said.“This success is a testament to the outstanding undergraduate education that our students receive, not only in terms of their academic work but also in terms of the scholarly engagement activities that they pursue beyond the classroom both in the U.S. and abroad,” said Thibert, the assistant director of national fellowships for the Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement (CUSE).“CUSE looks forward to continuing to work with the Class of 2015 as they become alumni — it’s never too late to apply for some of these fellowships, and every year, alumni receive major awards like the Rhodes Scholarship, the Gates Cambridge Scholarship or the Fulbright.”The Fulbright U.S. Student Program provides grants for international research or study projects and English teaching assistant programs, according to the program’s website. Nine seniors received Fulbright grants this year, and Notre Dame had 17 recipients as an institution, the most the University has ever had, Thibert said.Claire Donovan will travel to Togo in West Africa to research “Micronutrient Fortification and Maternal Health in Togo: A Model for Sustainable Aid” on a fellowship.Christina Gutierrez received the Fulbright/Casten Family Foundation Award to study at the University of Gastronomic Sciences in Italy. Gutierrez is a Hesburgh-Yusko Scholar, as well as a Kellogg Institute International Scholar.(Editor’s note: Gutierrez is the business manager for The Observer.)A Kellog Institute International Scholar, Alexis Palá will be studying in Chile on a Fulbright.Three students earned English Teaching Assistantship grants from the Fulbright program: Leila Green, Kendra Reiser and Ryan Schultheis. Green will be teaching in South Africa, Reiser in Indonesia and Schultheis in Mexico.The National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowships provide funding for research-based study leading to a master’s or doctoral degree in the STEM fields (science, technology, engineering and math), according to the Fellowships’ website.The program receives more than 16,000 applications for 2015 and awarded 2,000 fellowships.The three recipients of the fellowship were Ashley Armstrong, a mechanical engineer; Patrick Marino, a physics and mechanical engineering double major; and Annie Stephenson, a physics major.Tyler Barron, a sociology and American Studies double major, was awarded the Udall Native American Congressional internship. The internship provides American Indian and Alaska Native students an opportunity to understand the government-to-government relationship between Native Tribes and the federal government, the program’s website said. Barron is the first recipient from Notre Dame in the school’s history, Thibert said.Two students received the Austrian Teaching Assistantship, which provides graduates with an interest in Austrian students to work at secondary schools throughout Austria, the website said. Eric Donahue and Rachel Ruddick, both majors in biological sciences with minors in German, both declined for the Fulbright U.S. Student Program.Eric Donahue also was awarded the DAAD (Deutscher Akademischer Austausch Dienst, German for ‘German Academic Exchange System’) Study Scholarship.CUSE encourages the class of 2015 to continue to apply for fellowships; alumni are eligible to apply for scholarships such as the Rhodes and Marshall Scholarships, Thibert said.“These fellowship opportunities can significantly enhance a recipient’s profile while advancing their academic and professional trajectories in unique ways and connecting them to future leaders in a variety of fields,” Thibert said.To learn more about these opportunities, visit http://fellows.nd.edu/fellowships.Tags: Austrian Teaching Assistantship, Class of 2015, CUSE, DAAD Study Scholarship, Fellowships, Fulbright U.S. Student Program, NSF Graduate Research Fellowships, Udall Native American Congressional Internshiplast_img read more

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Journal directory errors noted

first_imgJournal directory errors noted A number of corrections to the 2004 Bar Journal directory have been noted to the editorial staff. To set the record straight: Jennifer Lynn Charak ’s e-mail address is [email protected] (p. 113). Maria V. Feliu Maurrasse should have been included on page 179. Her address is 10621 S.W. 117th Ave., Miami 33186, phone 305-779-5041; fax 305-271-4085, e-mail [email protected] Michael Steven Greene of Coral Gables was inadvertently omitted from the directory. His address is 269 Giralda Ave., Ste. 201, Coral Gables 33134; phone: 305-444-2610; fax: 305-444-2655; e-mail: [email protected] Cristina Elena Groschel ’s phone number is 954-735-0000 (p. 226). Stephen K. Halpert ’s e-mail address is [email protected] (p. 233). Joseph James Huss ’s phone number is 954-761-3454 (p. 262). Joyce A. Julian ’s phone number is 954-467-6656 (p. 276).Due to an inaccuracy regarding her name, Shelly Wald Schwartz ’ information was printed out of order on page 538 and her name was incorrect on page 35 of the certified lawyers section. Ms. Schwartz is with Redgrave & Oliver LLP, 120 E. Palmetto Park Rd., Ste. 450, Boca Raton 33432; phone: 561-347-1700; fax: 561-391-9944; e-mail: [email protected] Robert Soifer ’s phone number is 407-236-0567 (p. 491). directory errors noted November 1, 2004 Regular News Journallast_img read more

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