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Great War left an enduring legacy across Harvard

first_img Additional Veterans Day events Harvard Law School Thursday, 4 p.m. — Disabled American Veterans Distinguished Speaker Series: Chief Judge Robert N. Davis, U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims, WCC 2036 Milstein East B, Harvard Law School. Harvard Graduate School of Education Thursday, 2-3 p.m. — Veterans and Servicemembers Virtual Information Session. Prospective students will have a chance hear from and ask questions of an admission liaison and financial aid representative in addition to current HGSE students who are veterans and servicemembers. Register online to receive a login: https://apply.gse.harvard.edu/register/military2018 U.S. Army Cpl. Arthur Briggs Church, 32, was killed on a French battlefield during an attack on Germany’s fortified Hindenburg Line on Sept. 28, 1918.Marine Lt. Carleton Burr, 26, was leading his men in an advance on the battlefields of Picardie, France, when he was struck and killed by shrapnel on Sept. 20, 1918.And in the skies over Chamery, France, on Bastille Day 1918, Lt. Quentin Roosevelt, the 20-year-old son of President Theodore Roosevelt, was shot down and killed in a dogfight with a flock of German planes.Church, Burr, and Roosevelt, who all died in the final months of World War I, are just three of the 372 students, alumni and faculty whose names are engraved on the granite walls of the Memorial Room in Harvard’s Memorial Church.The Great War left an enduring legacy on the Harvard campus. The Memorial Church, its bell, and the Memorial Room are all testaments to the sense of loss the University community felt in its wake.“The Memorial Room commemorates the Harvard men who died in World War I, and to whom the church is dedicated,” said Edward Elwyn Jones, Gund University organist and choirmaster. “The Memorial Church holds such a prominent place on Harvard’s campus, and it is first a church dedicated to peace, but also to sacrifice. I think it is wonderful for us, especially this year, to be mindful of that sacrifice.”,Over the next several weeks, Memorial Church will commemorate the 100th anniversary of the end of the war with a series of performances featuring the music and composers of the era. The performances, which will all take place in the church sanctuary, are free and open to the public.Friday, noon — Uppsala University Chamber Ensemble musicians and French pianist Paul André Bempéchat present a concert of chamber music by Swedish romantic composers, including Wilhelm Peterson-Berger, Dag Wirén, André Chini, Christer Hermansson, and Gunnar de Frumerie.Saturday, 7:30 p.m. — Massachusetts vocalists Deborah Selig and David McFerrin and pianist Clifton J. Nobel present “Angel Spirits: Music of World War I.”Sunday, 4 p.m. — Harvard University Choir Concert, “Remembering,” featuring the music of Lili Boulanger and Charles Hubert Hastings Parry and the U.S. premiere of a new choral piece, “In Flanders Fields,” by Gareth Treseder.Friday, 9 a.m.‒noon; Saturday, 8 a.m.‒7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 1 p.m.‒4 p.m. — Exhibition of the wartime etchings of Alphege Brewer.Dec 4, 8 p.m. — The Tactus Ensemble, “Songs of Farewell.”The concerts offer a teaching moment about the war’s impact. The carnage decimated a generation, including its artists. The English composer Parry, for example, lost many of his former students, Jones said.“I talk a certain amount to our students about the history of the war itself, but also the artistic endeavors and reactions to the war,” he said. “Many artists and musicians fought during the war and many lost their lives. But the ones who were left behind were deeply affected by it. Parry’s reactions to the war are very visceral and we hear that in the music.” That deep sense of loss and sacrifice also permeates the Memorial Church, which was dedicated in 1932 to honor those in the Harvard community killed in World War I.Inscribed at the top of the wall of the Memorial Room are the words of Harvard President A. Lawrence Lowell, who also donated the church’s bell: “While a bright future beckoned, they freely gave their lives and fondest hopes for us and our allies that we might learn from them courage in peace to spend our lives making a better world for others.”The Memorial Church recognizes the service and sacrifice of all Harvard veterans, especially during Veterans Day weekend. The walls of the sanctuary are dedicated to more than 1,000 members of the Harvard community who died in World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War.,The Rev. Jonathan L. Walton, Plummer Professor of Christian Morals and Pusey Minister in the Memorial Church, said every time he steps into the church sanctuary and the Memorial Room he is reminded of the words of the Rev. Phillips Brooks, the longtime rector of Boston’s Trinity Church and namesake of Harvard’s Phillips Brooks House.“‘How carefully most men creep into nameless graves, when occasionally one or two forget themselves into immortality,’ Brooks wrote,” Walton said. “Etched on the walls are the names of men and women who were able to live a life that was worth living because they found a cause and a purpose greater than themselves. We continue to honor their service, their sacrifice, and their memory.”On Sunday, members of Harvard ROTC will speak at the Faith & Life Forum at 9:30 a.m. in the Buttrick Room. The Commemoration of Benefactors and of the War Dead will take place during the Sunday Service beginning at 11 a.m. Former Massachusetts Gov. Deval L. Patrick will preach. The church will also be open on Veterans Day from 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Morning Prayers, which begin at 8:30 a.m., will feature U.S. Army veteran Richard Martinez ’21.last_img read more

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After Henry’s shocking death, Pace remembers, perseveres

first_imgTo see the effect Danroy ‘D.J.’ Henry had on a profound number of people, look no further than the 800 that crowded the Pace University gymnasium in his memory last Sunday. One by one, Henry’s friends and other Pace students told stories and anecdotes about how they remembered him best. ‘Danroy was very popular and had a lot of friends,’ said Joe O’Donnell, Pace’s athletic director. ‘I think the students that got up and said something were able to get some of the feelings they had out.’ Henry was shot and killed by two police officers Oct. 17 outside a bar in Thornwood, N.Y. His death occurred hours after Pace lost its Homecoming game to Stonehill College, a college coincidentally located in Henry’s hometown of Easton, Mass. Henry’s death has become a national story. There are highly conflicting accounts of the shooting from police and witnesses, and there are questions about whether proper medical attention was given to him after he was shot. Pace will take the field for its first game after Henry’s death this Saturday in a league matchup against University of New Haven. This is one of the first steps toward normalcy in what has been a hectic series of events for the Pace football team. Or as close to normal as it can get.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text O’Donnell said the team has taken steps to bring things back to the way they were. Last week’s game against Bentley College — which was supposed to be Homecoming in Waltham, Mass. — was cancelled. The players took Sunday and Monday off from practice after the death of their teammate and resumed practices Tuesday. O’Donnell said this was an effort to bring back the normalcy to which the team is accustomed. The last time Pace had to cancel a game was in the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. But O’Donnell doesn’t expect that normalcy to return soon. ‘There’s nothing in the makeup of college kids to handle something like this,’ he said. ‘Most people don’t experience the loss of a parent, brother or sister until later in life. To lose something like this, this is very dramatic.’ That Sunday night, a candlelight vigil was held on the football field. Immediately following the vigil, those students returned to the Pace gym to tell their stories. Stories of how Henry is remembered as a genuinely good-natured person. Pat Casey, a senior finance, accounting and entrepreneurship and emerging enterprises major at Syracuse, went to Oliver Ames High School in Easton, Mass., with Henry and played football with him for three years. When he first met Henry during their freshman year of high school, Henry was a much smaller person. After putting in time in the weight room year after year, Casey said he became fit and much more of an athlete. He said Henry always planned to play sports in college. A three-sport athlete at Oliver Ames, he constantly put in effort to succeed. After graduating from Oliver Ames in 2007, Henry did a post-graduate year to improve as a player and was recruited to play at Iona College. When Iona dropped its football program in 2008, Henry searched for a new team and found a home at Division II Pace, located in Westchester County. ‘He wasn’t insecure at all, he was comfortable in his own skin,’ Casey said. ‘He knew what he was capable of. He wanted to grow from that.’ Casey called him an inspiring figure. ‘He was one of those kids who really was working his a** off and really going hard, going out of his way to be nice to people,’ Casey said. ‘He showed appreciation for where he was in life.’ So Pace will show that same respect to its routine. For them, getting on the field each Saturday is normal. So at 1 p.m., when the game kicks off, some of that normal might return. That return to the field helped Connecticut after a similar tragedy occurred in Storrs last season. Almost a year to the day before Henry was killed, UConn cornerback Jasper Howard was stabbed and killed at an on-campus event following the Huskies’ win over Louisville. UConn took to the field to escape the pressures surrounding the situation. ‘The games and practices were really healthy because it let you think just about football and nothing else,’ said Connecticut Associate Director of Athletics/Communications Mike Enright. ‘It’s a place to escape, if you will.’ UConn scheduled practices and press conferences in the days following Howard’s death at the same time they had always been scheduled. It wasn’t normal, but it was consistent. It helped to keep the team together. The team also emphasized the attitude of playing the remaining games the way Howard ‘would have wanted them to play football,’ Enright said. That is a sentiment that also holds true for the Setters. ‘The attitude is there. It’s a good attitude,’ O’Donnell said. ‘They want to play this for D.J., which will be normal. … We try not to get too emotional.’ After discussing with his captains, head coach Chris Dapolito thought this was the best move for the team. ‘We’ve talked to everyone, we’ve talked to the faculty,’ O’Donnell said. ‘The faculty has been absolutely wonderful in the ways they’ve tried to help the student-athletes get back to normalcy. If there is a normalcy after this.’ [email protected] Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on October 27, 2010 at 12:00 pmcenter_img Commentslast_img read more

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AEK wants Vedad Ibisevic?

first_imgThe Greek AEK wants to bring a reinforcement in the attack, and the priority is the BH national team player Vedad Ibisevic.The injury of the Algerian national team player and striker of AEK Rafik Djebbour forced the sports director of the Greek club Branko Milovanovic to seek for an adequate replacement, and the BH national team player and the current member of the Bundesliga club Stuttgart Vedad Ibisevic emerged as an ideal solution.Milovanovic is interested in several players, but he would be satisfied the most if he could manage to realize the transfer of Ibisevic, who proved himself in the German Bundesliga. Ibisevic played 143 matches for Hoffenheim and scored 48 goals, while he performed in 86 matches for Stuttgart and recorded 33 goals. Moreover, in his favourite shirt – the one of the national team of B&H – the popular Vedo played 64 matches in which he scored 24 goals.Ibisevic is under contract with Stuttgart until June 30th 2017, and if AEK does not manage to buy the player the club would be satisfied with borrowing as well.Ibisevic is 31 years old, and his market value is estimated to two million EUR.(Source: klix.ba/ photo tacno)last_img read more

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Finn Harps pair detained by Gardai after public order incident

first_imgFinn Harps have said that they are ‘aware of a situation’ after two players were reported to have been detained by Gardai following an alleged incident in Dundalk.The alleged incident happened in the early hours of Monday morning on Park Street in Dundalk.The two players, brothers Michael and Ciaran O’Connor, who featured in Saturday night’s 2-0 win over Cobh Ramblers, will be available for Harps’ game against Wexford Youths on Friday night in Ballybofey, the club has said. Michael O’Connor is on loan at Harps from Shamrock Rovers, while Ciaran O’Connor is in his second spell at Harps having previously been at the club last season.Gardai have confirmed that two males were detained for public order offences and were held for a number of hours.Harps have held their own internal enquiries.“The club is aware of a situation but cannot make any further comment,” a club spokesman said. Harps manager Ollie Horgan was questioned on the matter at a press briefing in Letterkenny ahead of the Wexford clash, but declined to comment.A Garda statement about the incident said: “While on patrol in Dundalk on Monday, March 19, at approximately 3.25am, Gardai observed a male, 19, was damaging cars.“Members attempted to arrest the male but the suspect’s brother, 21, impeded. Gardai called for ­assistance.“While suspect was being placed into patrol car he became free and made his escape.“Gardai caught the male and placed him in a patrol car.” A video clip emerged yesterday, purporting to show the pair being detained by Gardai, and has been widely circulated this morning. Finn Harps pair detained by Gardai after public order incident was last modified: March 22nd, 2018 by Chris McNultyShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Ciaran O’ConnorDundalkfinn harpsGardaiMichael O’Connorlast_img read more

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