Tag: 夜上海论坛MH

Cotton Variety Selection

first_imgWith so many options on the market, growers have had to learn how to manage different varieties. In Terrell County, McGhee used different seed varieties from different companies, planted them in field trials and harvested the crops to see what variety worked best in his county. “We rely heavily on cooperation with our county agents to get these trials planted and harvested,” Whitaker said. “We use the information from these trials implemented by our agents to get an idea of how well varieties perform across the state.” Nick McGhee, Terrell County Extension coordinator, is one of those cooperating Extension agents.“This program is something that a lot of the growers in Terrell County can benefit from. Cotton variety selection is an important decision that they face every year,” he said. With cotton prices plummeting below 60 cents this winter, selecting a variety to plant for the upcoming season is a critical decision for Georgia farmers. The University of Georgia Cotton Variety Selection Program provides growers with the research-based information they need to produce the state’s No. 1 row crop.UGA Extension agronomist Jared Whitaker, who helped start the program, said he has seen the right variety choice add $100 an acre or more to a farmer’s bottom line. In 2014, DP 1252 B2RF, CG3783 B2RF and PHY 333 WRF were the varieties with statistically similar and highest average lint yield when averaged across all 20 trials. With regards to consistency across those trials, those same varieties had yields within the top three of 12 varieties evaluated in at least 45 percent of the 20 trials. For more information about variety performance from this program, contact your local county agent or visit the UGA Cotton Web page at ugacotton.com.The data produced from the cotton variety selection can be seen at ugacotton.com/cotton-variety-selection/.According to UGA’s Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development, Georgia produced more than $1.2 billion in cotton in 2013. “We started the program so that we could evaluate a small set of promising varieties across a large number of locations and environments to observe performance in various situations and get an idea of where varieties perform best and which are most consistent,” Whitaker said.Jeff Davis County cotton farmer Wayne Herndon has helped with the program since its inception. Whitaker uses Herndon’s land to plant and test different cotton varieties.center_img “The program allows us to see what variety works best in different types of soil and environments,” Herndon said. “And it has helped me decide what varieties to plant.”Rather than growing cotton in just one part of the state for the UGA program, Whitaker aims to grow cotton in different counties across Georgia to see how the different varieties perform in various environments. Cotton seed can be expensive, and yields can be attributed to the variety that farmers choose. According to McGhee, cotton producers have the potential to increase their gross revenue by more than $3.5 million annually in Terrell County if they choose the right variety. “They were all planted in the same field and managed the same way, which determined what variety yielded the best,” McGhee said. (Jordan Hill is an intern with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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Omoluwa, Golf Community Mourn Shagaya’s Death

first_imgInterestingly, when he was alive, General Shagaya was fond of telling the story of how he prevailed on Omoluwa to be a member of the IBB Golf Club Board of Trustees.Shagaya mentioned that he picked on Omoluwa so there could be a sweet mix between the young and all other elderly members in the club’s Board of Trustees.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram A prominent member of the Board of Trustees of the IBB Golf Club in Abuja, Sir Lucky Omoluwa, has said that the passing of General John Shagaya (rtd) in a car crash last Sunday came to him as a rude shock.Omoluwa who received the sad news at the time he was about to preside over presentation of prizes at the last IBB Ladies Open believes the shocking demise of Shagaya would leave a yawning gap in the nation, especially the IBB Golf Club he helped build.Omoluwa also said that: “Without Shagaya there could not have been the IBB Golf Club. The man served the club diligently and selflessly. I don’t think we should allow all that to go away because the man is no longer around. We must immortalise him. I can only pray that God will grant him eternal rest. He was a good man”.last_img read more

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Despite shaky past, Syracuse finishes strong, tops Loyola

first_imgIt was becoming an ugly trend. Before Syracuse hosted Loyola in the Carrier Dome Friday night, Syracuse had lost three games to ranked opponents by just a goal apiece. With SU trailing the Greyhounds in the second half, it appeared as if the Orange was in for another disappointing finish.But on this night there was a different feel down the stretch.The No. 10 Orange (9-4, 4-1 Big East) was able to stand its ground on Friday, defeating No. 13 Loyola, 13-11, in front of 412 fans at the Carrier Dome. Though SU dismantled Villanova (7-6, 0-5) Sunday, 18-3, the real challenge of the weekend came on Friday night. Coming off a heartbreaking one-goal loss to No. 11 Notre Dame last Sunday, Syracuse needed to prove to itself that it could defeat a fellow Big East power, especially in a tight contest.‘I think we came in today knowing that we had to come away with a win,’ senior attack Halley Quillinan said. ‘We knew that we were going to face a strong Big East team looking to come in here and upset us in the Dome. At the end, we kept our composure,’ The Orange came out of the gate with a vengeance, scoring three quick goals in the first eight minutes to take an early lead. Loyola responded with three goals of its own before senior midfielder Christina Dove gave the Orange a lead with her first goal of the game. The Greyhounds scored three of the last four goals in the half to take a 6-5 lead into the break.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSU had been here before. Deadlocked in tight games against quality opponents, the Orange has found itself on the short side of the stick more often than not this season. On Feb. 27 SU fell to No. 4 Virginia, 14-13. Then on March 21 the Orange was narrowly denied what would have been a monumental upset, losing to No. 1 Northwestern, 13-12. And then there’s the Notre Dame game, which proved especially damaging considering that it came at the hands of a Big East opponent.Syracuse knew that it couldn’t let another close one slip away.The second half didn’t begin as the Orange would have liked, as Loyola scored a little more than two minutes in for a two-goal lead, the Greyhounds’ largest of the evening. But about seven minutes into the half, the momentum began to turn.The Orange was outshot 18-8 in the first half as its offense rarely had the ball in its own territory. But suddenly Syracuse began to play a quicker game, moving the ball effectively and giving itself ample opportunities to score. After numerous missed shots, freshman attack Tegan Brown broke the ice with a free-position goal at the 20:29 mark.‘I think we just got our composure and our confidence back,’ Brown said. ‘We brought it together. We started talking and communicating again and decided to go at full pace.’Following Brown’s goal, the Orange began to wake up. SU scored three of the next five goals before freshman attack Michelle Tumolo scored what would be the eventual game-winner on a picture-perfect pass off a fast break.The Carrier Dome crowd erupted louder than it had all season, and the Orange never looked back en route to a victory.‘I think we were in a bit of a funk coming off the Notre Dame game,’ head coach Gary Gait said. ‘And I think they had a little bit of self-doubt. We just had to play the game, and instead of stopping to make passes and cutting at three-quarters speed, they decided to go at full speed.’Though Syracuse has not had a wealth of success in close games thus far, Quillinan admits that she enjoys when the games are tight. She believes that it brings out the best of her ability and gives her team a chip on its shoulder.Luckily for the Orange, that chip finally resulted in a win.‘I like close games,’ Quillinan said. ‘I like a battle. I like being competitive. I like walking in knowing that the other team is ready for a fight. To see the fire in some of my teammates’ eyes — like Michelle (Tumolo) and (freshman midfielder) Bridget Daley — that just makes me better and pushes me harder.’[email protected] Published on April 18, 2010 at 12:00 pm Commentscenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Ohio State’s Tattoo Gate, Alabama’s T-Town and other scandals that would be legal under new NIL rules

first_imgIU faced a choice: It could suspend Alford for the next game — just happened that it was the annual Kentucky showdown — or wait and take the matter to the NCAA infractions committee, where something along the lines of a three-game suspension was possible. Knight chose the one-game option, and the Hoosiers lost to Kentucky.  Johnny Football’s autographsThere was nothing dull about Johnny Manziel’s career as the quarterback at Texas A&M. The 2012 Heisman Trophy winner got into hot water with the NCAA for allegedly being paid a “five-figure flat fee” for signing merchandise before the 2013 BCS title game in Miami. And several other reports circulated about similar “scandals,” but there was no proof found. There was no incentive for anyone to talk with the NCAA, and, basically, no paper trail meant no way to severely punish Manziel. He was suspended for the first half of A&M’s 2013 season-opening home game against Rice. But the basics are this: Players will be allowed to make money for product endorsements, social media content and autographs. That’s a massive change. And it’s a frustrating change for certain fan bases that have seen their favorite programs dragged through the NCAA mud for violations that were ridiculous when they happened and would be fully legal and above board now. Here are four examples. It’s not a comprehensive list, of course — for example, we’re not diving into Georgia’s A.J. Green being suspended four games for selling his bowl-game jersey for $1,000 in 2010 — but just some high-profile examples. Ohio State’s Tattoo GateFive Ohio State players, including star quarterback Terrelle Pryor, were suspended for the first five games of the 2011 season for selling merchandise and receiving “improper benefits” from a tattoo parlor. The players sold Big Ten championship rings — from teams they played on — and their own football jerseys/pants/shoes, and Pryor sold a sportsmanship award he received after the 2008 Fiesta Bowl. In addition to the five-game suspension, players had to repay various amounts based on what they’d sold. The scandal ultimately led to the resignation of head coach Jim Tressel. The discount at the tattoo parlor was what seized the headlines, though, partially because it was such a stupid thing to have a rule against. “As a student-athlete,” Ohio State athletic director Gene Smith said at the time, “you’re not allowed to use your persona to get discounted services.”But starting in 2021-22? Use all the “persona” you want to get tattoos (or anything else), athletes. And Gene Smith, by the way, is co-chair of the NIL committee.Alabama’s T-Town scandalThis one never resulted in actual NCAA punishments — a source of frustration for everyone other than Alabama fans — but it dominated the headlines for several months in 2011 (and again in 2014). There was a shop in Tuscaloosa, T-Town Menswear, that had a massive collection of items autographed by former and current Alabama football players. The “current players” part was the sticky issue. There were also plenty of photos with the current football players posing with the shop’s owner, Tom Albetar, and while wearing merchandise that was available for purchase in the store. The questions were obvious: What were the players getting in exchange for all the autographs and pictures? That question was never officially answered, which was part of the reason for a lack of punishment. Alabama sent a cease-and-desist letter to Albetar and disassociated him from the program. But, if nothing else, the photos of the current players were on display at the store, and they were pretty clearly being used to promote the store. That’s a violation, too. It was a silly violation then, and starting in the 2021-22 school year, it won’t be a violation at all. Steve Alford’s charity calendarThis “violation” drove Indiana fans crazy at the time and it still gets their Hoosier blood boiling, as it rightly should. Steve Alford was their home-grown superstar in the middle of a legendary career in Bloomington. He’d represented the school in the 1984 Olympic Games and would lead the Hoosiers to the 1987 National Championship. He averaged nearly 17 points per game his first two seasons at IU, but he was forced to miss his team’s December 1985 rivalry game against Kentucky, in his junior season, because of a violation of NCAA rules. What did Alford do? He posed for a charity calendar for the Gamma Phi Beta sorority. Yep. He wasn’t paid for the appearance, and the calendar raised money for charity. But because the calendar was used to make money — didn’t matter how the money was used — that was a violation. When IU coach Bobby Knight heard about the calendar, he immediately self-reported the violation to the NCAA.  The NCAA announced its intention to start allowing its student-athletes to make money off their name, image and likeness on Wednesday morning. It’s a decision that’s been long awaited, and is certainly long overdue. There are still questions, though, because there are always questions with complicated issues. What is permissible and what is not permissible — and exactly how those hairs are going to be split — will have to be seen. The Board of Governors approved the NIL proposals, and a vote is expected to be taken in January 2021 for adoption for the 2021-22 academic year. last_img read more

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