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John Lloyd Young to Star in London’s Jersey Boys

first_imgTony winner John Lloyd Young will star as Frankie Valli in the West End’s Jersey Boys when it moves to the Piccadilly Theatre on March 15. Young, who originated the role on Broadway in 2005 and won a Tony Award for his performance, will headline the London production through April 27. The cast of the Tony and Olivier-winning musical, which follows the rise of Frankie Valli and his chart-topping group the Four Seasons, will also include Matt Nalton as Nick Massi, Edd Post as Bob Gaudio and Jon Boydon as Tommy De Vito. Michael Watson will play the role of Frankie Valli at certain performances. 

Young earned a Tony Award and a Broadway.com Audience Choice Award for his Broadway debut as Frankie Valli. He starred in the indie film Oy Vey! My Son Is Gay! and appeared on Glee. His off-Broadway credits include The Summer of Swans and Sarah, Plain and Tall. He revisited the role of Frankie Valli in Clint Eastwood’s film adaptation of Jersey Boys, due out in June 2014. Jersey Boys opened in London at the Prince Edward Theatre in 2008 and will play its last performance there on March 9.center_img The cast at the Piccadilly will also feature Nicola Brazil, Sophie Carmen-Jones, Thomas Goodridge, Lucinda Gill, Matthew Hunt, Mark Isherwood, Charlotte Jeffery, Ben Jennings, Stuart King, Sandy Moffat, Sean Mulligan, Tom Senior, Emma Stephens, Matt Thorpe, Graham Vick, Ben Wheeler and Rob Wilshaw. View Commentslast_img read more

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Paddling for pins

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest You can now win FishOhio-style pins just for paddling popular Ohio waterways. The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) new Paddle Ohio program rewards individuals with a commemorative pin each time they paddle four different Ohio wild, scenic and recreational rivers, water trails or select state park lakes. To participate in the program, all you have to do is submit information about your four paddling trips on the Paddle Ohio registration form at paddle.ohiodnr.gov and the agency will mail you a pin this fall.Pins are available for paddlers who paddle four, eight, 12, 16 and up to a maximum of 20 different segments of designated Paddle Ohio waters. Maps and more information on Ohio’s scenic rivers are available from the ODNR Division of Parks and Watercraft at watercraft.ohiodnr.gov/scenicrivers. Organized paddling events conductedAlthough folks are encouraged to paddle at their convenience to earn their pins, the ODNR is offering a series of Paddle Ohio canoe floats this summer to promote paddling on Ohio’s state-designated wild, scenic and recreational rivers, water trails and select state park lakes. Floats are planned on Stillwater/Greenville Creek, Little Miami, Maumee and Mohican state scenic rivers, which qualify for Paddle Ohio pins recognition.For more information about the events, including registration and possible time changes or float cancellations, visit paddle.ohiodnr.gov. Meanwhile, here is what’s coming up for the balance of the summer.Saturday and Sunday, July 22 and 23 “Lake Fest” at Cowan Lake State Park. Beginning Saturday at 1 p.m., visitors to Cowan Lake State Park will find a variety of opportunities for canoeing, kayaking and paddleboarding. Overnight camping options are available. For more information, contact Sarah Blair at [email protected], Aug. 12, on the Maumee Scenic River. This “Canoeing with Crawfish” float runs from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Participants will meet at Otsego Park in Bowling Green. Enjoy a scenic float with ODNR staff who will share interesting river features, and investigate the critters who call the river home. To register, visit reservations.woodcountyparkdistrict.org/programs.Sunday, Sept. 3, on the Little Miami Scenic River. This canoe float runs from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Participants will meet at the Caesar Creek State Park campground and shuttle to the Little Miami River. An electrofishing demonstration will be included. To register, contact Melissa Clark at [email protected], Sept. 20 on the Maumee Scenic River. This “Canoeing with Crawfish” float runs from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Participants will meet at Otsego Park in Bowling Green. Enjoy a scenic float with ODNR staff who will share interesting river features, and investigate the critters who call the river home. To register, visit reservations.woodcountyparkdistrict.org/programs.last_img read more

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Labor Day Thoughts on Unemployment and Weatherization

first_imgI’ve been thinking more than usual this Labor Day weekend about putting Americans to work while solving our energy crises. If our goals are to reduce unemployment, reduce our dependence on fossil fuels, and improve all the buildings that are bleeding energy into the night sky, we need a better way to sell and finance home energy weatherization contracts.The problem: how we sell weatherization workNeed-driven solar subsidies and PACE-type loan programs require the initiative to come from the client. But most people are not very motivated to save energy unless the improvements are free or “pay for themselves.” They aren’t likely to pick up the phone and call for an energy audit, let alone schedule the small improvements that would actually have decent payback.If, instead of a need-based subsidy, future tax credit, or any type of home-equity loan, we could sell $600 to $6,000 audit / weatherization packages as contract add-ons to the electrical connection, we could cut the paperwork and dramatically simplify the sales process. Instead of advertising to motivate customers to act, weatherization companies could target neighborhoods with door hangers and a deal where all you have to do is get a quick “energy nosebleed” audit, sign a contract agreeing to have the cost of the audit and repairs added to your monthly utility bill proportional to the anticipated cost savings, and give the utility permission to stop service for non-payment.I can’t believe what I’m seeingI’m talking about the little “I can’t believe what I’m seeing here” energy nosebleeds I see in middle-class homes and starter mansions: the disconnected, torn, or crushed AC supply ducts in the attic; the powered attic ventilators that are sucking conditioned air out of houses; the unsealed and uninsulated kitchen soffits; the inadequate attic ventilation; the tub drain cut-outs, HVAC chases, and skylight chases that are draining energy from homes. These problems don’t cost much to fix, and the payback for the repair work is decent compared with solar panels and new windows.The contract add-on would be similar to the way some cable TV and internet is sold, as an add-on to the phone bill. There would be no impact on home equity, no need for an additional credit check, as that is in place from the original utility connection. The preliminary audit would identify the “nosebleeds” that would have payback equivalent to the cost of the service during the time-frame of the agreement. Owner-occupied homes would be the logical target, but the pay-by-utility bill approach could work for rentals and light commercial properties as well.There would have to be language in the contract to cover payment or transfer at sale of the property as well as to cover situations where service cancellation due to non-payment could damage property or occupant health.The sales would be handled by weatherization contractors; all the utility would do is pass on the payment. Licensed energy auditors would find the nosebleeds as part of the sales team for the weatherization companies.Quality control would be managed through state energy office, with spot checks similar to termite-treatment companies. The same energy offices could manage the financial end, as middleman between investment firms selling green investment bonds and the weatherization companies signing on to sell and install large amounts of weatherization. Community colleges could train auditors, installers, and managers.This would allow weatherization companies to go door-to-door promoting a low-cost home energy tune-up with zero cash outlay, no impact on home equity, and minimal inconvenience to the occupants in the execution of the work — 100% financed by energy savings. This way, rather than waiting for the consumer to call and set up an appointment, a company can target whole neighborhoods and sign up a large percentage of the homes in a subdivision and reach some economies of scale and efficiencies of neighborhood implementation.Subsidized weatherization skews the value of for-profit weatherizationI’m opposed to subsidies for solar and weatherization, because I believe they skew the value of the work, creating the impression that it “isn’t worth it” unless subsidized. People will buy as much solar as the government will subsidize, and stop there. They like getting something for nothing, and if they can get up to a certain part of solar at half price, they wonder why they should pay full price for additional capacity.Even fully subsidized “free” weatherization for low-income families is problematical, because middle-class and wealthy people live and work in buildings that can save energy with modest weatherization improvements; since some people get this work for free, it sets the expectation that the work shouldn’t be expensive.I’m equally opposed to subsidies for the gas, nuclear, and coal industries. When gas goes over $3.50 a gallon, people sell gas-guzzlers and buy mopeds and hybrids, or they plan their driving so they can drive less. Once gas prices stabilize, we see new Mustangs and monster trucks on the highways.Rather than spending stimulus money on rebuilding roads, let’s just change the way we sell weatherization. We should invest in research and education to retrain our own people to reduce our need for energy through American ingenuity. We can put people to work at the same time that we reduce the deficit.Author’s note: These opinions are mine alone and don’t necessarily reflect those of others who contribute to or frequent this site.last_img read more

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Tourism Minister Says Companies that Invest in Workers Will Reap Rewards

first_img “The JCTI is the result of a major collaborative effort with both local and international educational institutions and businesses,” Mr. Bartlett noted. Story Highlights Minister of Tourism, Hon. Edmund Bartlett, says organisations that value and invest in their employees will reap the rewards of a truly engaged workforce. “Human capital and economic growth tend to go hand in hand. Therefore, if we hope to unlock the unlimited potential of Jamaica’s tourism sector, the development of our human capital holds the key,” the Minister argued. Minister of Tourism, Hon. Edmund Bartlett, says organisations that value and invest in their employees will reap the rewards of a truly engaged workforce.The Minister, who was speaking at the annual Melia Braco Village Staff Awards on February 19 at Melia Braco, Trelawny, said the flipside, however, is that entities that treat their workers as just another commodity will find it increasingly difficult to sustain a competitive advantage.“Human capital and economic growth tend to go hand in hand. Therefore, if we hope to unlock the unlimited potential of Jamaica’s tourism sector, the development of our human capital holds the key,” the Minister argued.Mr. Bartlett said it is specifically for this reason that the Ministry, in 2017, launched the Jamaica Centre for Tourism Innovation (JCTI), which is “providing a path to professionalism” for workers in the tourism industry.“The JCTI is the result of a major collaborative effort with both local and international educational institutions and businesses,” Mr. Bartlett noted.“They include the Tourism Product Development Company (TPDCo), an agency of the Ministry of Tourism; the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information; the Ministry of Labour and Social Security; the HEART Trust/NTA and the George Washington University, which have all had a critical role to play in the JCTI’s development,” he added.The Minister said the institution offers access to certification programmes that support existing hospitality programmes at several tertiary institutions.“Through the JCTI, individuals will have access to certification in areas such as hospitality management, tourism management, culinary arts, spa management and many others,” he noted.Mr. Bartlett said that the JCTI pilot project, which began in December 2017, is nearing completion, adding that 150 candidates were targeted to include employed persons seeking accreditation as Certified Hospitality Supervisors, recent college graduates seeking accreditation as Certified Hospitality Supervisors and academic staff seeking credentials to deliver Certified Hospitality Information Analytics training.“It also includes students seeking accreditation in Certified Hospitality Information Analytics, and American Culinary Federation (ACF) Executive Chefs seeking accreditation as ACF Certified Evaluators,” the Minister added.Mr. Bartlett further noted that the candidates who sought Certified Hospitality Information Analytics completed their studies and examinations in November 2017, while the majority of the first cohort of candidates is now preparing for examinations, scheduled to take place in early March 2018.The Minister said that while training is only one aspect of personal and professional development, “our tourism workers, like all workers, ought to be rewarded for their dedication and should feel as if they are truly benefiting from the sector,” he said.“I am, therefore, pleased to announce that arrangements for introduction of the Tourism Workers’ Pension Scheme are well under way. We will be issuing a second set of drafting instructions to the Chief Parliamentary Counsel after comments are received from the Attorney General’s Chambers,” Mr. Bartlett said.last_img read more

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