Tag: 上海高端商务学生伴游预约

Students, faculty remember Cathy Pieronek

first_imgLast Thursday, Catherine “Cathy” Pieronek, an associate dean in the College of Engineering and the director of the women’s engineering program, passed away suddenly at the age of 52.According to College of Engineering Dean Peter Kilpatrick, Pieronek proved to be a champion of the women engineers on Notre Dame’s campus, but also on a national level. Students have recalled her dedication to the engineers and also to the school as a campus leader who sought to continually improve the University and, specifically, the College of Engineering.In an email, Kilpatrick described one of Pieronek’s large contributions to the women’s engineering program that dealt with residence halls. When Pieronek joined the engineering faculty in 2002, female enrollment in the college was lower than it was now, and each women’s residence hall only had “one to two” engineers living in it.“This meant that women who wanted to study with their classmates and other engineers would have to go to another residence hall (often a male residence hall) and when the parietals require women students leaving male dorms at midnight (despite whether the homework or studying was all finished), this placed a hardship on the women engineering students,” he said.“So Cathy, in concert with others in the College, got [the Office of Residence Life] to start clustering women engineers in fewer dorms so women could develop natural study partners in their own residence hall. This strategy, and many others, has led to a dramatic increase in both the retention and the numbers and percentages of women in engineering here at Notre Dame. We are now well over 30 percent, a remarkable increase in the last 10-plus years. Cathy played by far the dominant role in this transformation.”Kilpatrick and others recalled her tendency to be extremely direct with students in her role as an advisor.“I have so many memories of Cathy, but perhaps my favorite memory was when I shared with her recently how grateful a parent was for the direct and forceful advice that Cathy gave his son on the occasion of struggling academically and disciplinarily and the way the young man had been able to turn things around with Cathy’s support and encouragement,” he said. “Cathy gave me a simple ‘aw, shucks’ response and immediately deflected the accolade.“This was classic Cathy. She did what she did for our students because she was deeply committed and cared about them as persons. In this regard, Cathy taught us how to be fully human and fully Christian.”Senior Cecilia Ruiz said she met Pieronek when she was a first-year engineering student and member of the First Year Engineering Council.“What I remember the most is her passion to education and her devotion to her students,” Ruiz said in an email. “She touched many lives with her advice and picked up many of us who struggled through some of our semesters.“Always understanding, but firm, she encouraged me to continue in my endeavors and challenged all whose lives she touched to be the best version of themselves. I can’t think of a better role model to follow as an aspiring female aerospace engineer, and I am grateful for her presence in my life.”Senior Maggie Miller said her relationship with Pieronek began during her freshman year. She said Pieronek took an interest in her summer job with Notre Dame’s Introduction to Engineering Program and talked to her frequently throughout the summer.“Most of the conversations we would have were about how we could make the College better, how we could improve the perception of engineers on campus,” Miller said in an email. “This was especially pertinent to me as I have been heavily involved with various performing arts groups during my time at Notre Dame, and Cathy always took a surprising interest in this and in other students that were leaving their mark on campus in areas other than engineering. She wanted us to feel like we were students and to get away from seeing ourselves as nerds who could only sit in their rooms and study.“She fought relentlessly for the students in the College, and even though she was often very hard on struggling students they were always better for it. Tough love was definitely her approach, but it was in fact a deep love that she showed the students.”Miller said Pieronek was especially important for the women of the College, which she witnessed firsthand as a student representative on the College of Engineering Council.“I remember in one meeting looking around and realizing that Cathy and myself were the only women in the room of 20 or so other people, and Cathy always played a large role in running those meetings,” Miller said. “She became someone I very much wanted to emulate in her confidence and in her caring.”Senior Ryan Griffin said Pieronek cared about all her students in the College of Engineering, which led to a tough but rewarding mentoring style.“She expected you to own up to your mistakes and act like an adult,” Griffin said in an email. “But if you were capable of doing that, Cathy would match you every step of the way working with you, teachers, the department, advisors, you name it, in order to help you succeed. She was also an incredible mentor to the students who got close to her.“Those of us who were lucky enough to call her a mentor will forever treasure the advice she gave us and carry her words with us in our careers.”Tags: Cathy Pieronek, College of Engineering, SWE, Women’s engineeringlast_img read more

Read more…

Trojans take their final stand at home

first_imgThis is it.For USC’s senior class, Saturday will be its last hurrah at the Coliseum. Although the season may not have gone as planned for the 19 players suiting up for the final time at home, establishing bowl bids and the Pac-10 pecking order will still be at stake when No. 20 USC (8-3, 5-3) takes on Arizona (7-4, 5-3) Saturday at 12:30 p.m.Saying goodbye · Sixth-year defensive back Josh Pinkard will be among the 19 seniors that will suit up at the Coliseum for the final time on Saturday against Arizona. – Mike Lee | Daily TrojanA bid to the Holiday Bowl could be on the line for both the Wildcats and the Trojans, pending the result of Thursday night’s game between Oregon and Oregon State. Both USC and Arizona could finish the season either tied for second in the Pac-10 or tumble down to sixth place.“We’re kind of feeling good about getting back on track after the two weeks prior,” USC coach Pete Carroll said. “We are looking forward to this last go round.”Safety Taylor Mays is among the seniors who will be playing for the final time in the Coliseum. Cornerback Josh Pinkard and offensive guard Jeff Byers will also be making their final starts after six years with USC.“It’s a great group of kids and we hate seeing them go,” Carroll said. “We’d love to send them off on a great note.”Despite securing two late touchdown drives against UCLA, including a controversial decision to throw a touchdown to redshirt junior wide receiver Damian Williams in the final minute, Carroll is still looking for more out of his offense. He said he was especially concerned with the team’s performance on third downs, where penalties and plays for negative yards kept the Trojans behind the chains.USC converted four of 12 third-down attempts last week and ranks 100th out of 120 Football Bowl Subdivision teams in third-down efficiency.“It continues to be an issue,” Carroll said. “Because of the long yardage situations, we gave up on some of them just to kick the football back. We have to improve there.”With junior running back Joe McKnight sitting out practice Wednesday, redshirt junior running back Allen Bradford could see an increased workload following a two-touchdown performance against UCLA. Bradford carried the ball 14 times against the Bruins and helped USC control the ball and keep the clock running late in the game.“We love him being part of the offense,” Carroll said. “So it wouldn’t be any problem for me at all to run him 25 times if that was the case in the game.”The Wildcats have experienced a rocky season in which six of their games have been decided by eight points or less. Last week, Arizona needed a last-second field goal to defeat rival Arizona State.But for all the progress that Arizona has made this season, USC remains one of the few great tests. The Wildcats have not beaten the Trojans in the last seven years, despite holding the contest close in each of the last two years.Arizona coach Mike Stoops said Saturday’s game would be a good measuring stick for how far the program has come.“Competing against USC, I think tells you a lot about where you’re at,” Stoops said. “I think you learn more and more about your team as you go through it. Certainly we’ll see how we match up with USC Saturday.”The Wildcats are still sorting our a series of injuries to several key players on their explosive offense. Junior running back Nic Grigsby is not expected to play Saturday because of a shoulder injury. Sophomore quarterback Nick Foles has a broken non-throwing hand but will still try to play against the Trojans. Backup sophomore quarterback Matt Scott is expected to see time on a handful of plays as a change-of-pace player.But even with the injuries, Carroll noted that the Wildcats’ attack was dangerous because of its versatility.“We have a big preparation in store here to get ready for this thing,” Carroll said. “They’ve scored a lot of points this year and done a lot of good stuff with their offense.”last_img read more

Read more…