Tag: 上海游艇会所排名

Students, University respond to arrests

first_imgIn response to the large number of students recently arrested and incarcerated for underage drinking, representatives from the University and student government met with the South Bend Police Department (SBPD) this week.  “It’s the pattern to me that is of most concern,” he said. “We need to make sure that our students’ rights and their dignity is protected and that’s why we went down to meet with them face to face.” He added that it is not excise officers’ protocol to incarcerate people for underage drinking, but certain conditions may provoke it. Doyle asked students, especially those who are underage, to be “model citizens” in the community this weekend. Trent expects complaints will subside once the weather cools down because parties will move indoors and residents will sleep with their windows shut.  Indiana State Excise Police Commander Lt. Tim Cleveland said excise police will also be in St. Joseph County this weekend, but does not have plans to step up enforcement. Doyle said the University met with police because students repeatedly shared stories in which they felt their rights or dignity had been violated when interacting with law enforcement officers.  These meetings opened communication channels and resulted in small changes in SBPD procedure, Fr. Tom Doyle, vice president for Student Affairs said. The recent trend to incarcerate students — rather than issue citations — stems from the fact that police hold a certain amount of liability for students who are allowed to go home, Trent said. “There were lots of conversations we can work on within student government that can lead to greater changes,” she said. “As long as they’re in proximity to the car, there will be an audio account,” he said. “This is for the officer’s security and this is for everybody’s security.” “I expect my officers to be respectful of those that they’re citing or arresting, and likewise we expect those who are being issued summons or arrested to be respectful as well,” he said.  South Bend police officers will wear and activate body microphones, Doyle said. “We’re not in a situation any longer where we can just shrug and allow 50 or 100 students in a residential neighborhood to just disperse,” Trent said.  Trent said officers are responding to noise complaints and are “not trying to hinder or put a stop to the college experience.” “From our perspective, we’re getting calls from people and they’re saying ‘I’m trying to sleep and there’s a mob behind my house,’” he said. But Doyle also said there are two sides to every story and used the University’s meeting with police Tuesday as an opportunity to hear from the other side.  Cleveland also encouraged students to work with law enforcement officers and said “a little cooperation goes a long way.”  “If they’re not cooperative or they’re too intoxicated, then I’ll leave that to my officers discretion as whether to incarcerate,” he said.  Going into the first home football weekend, there will be 25 South Bend police officers patrolling the city Friday and Saturday night, Soler said.  “They have a very hard job to do and we understand that,” he said.  Doyle said SBPD was “receptive” and Soler agreed. She said student government plans to meet with police again within two weeks.  For example, if a group of people are stopped on Washington Street, two miles from campus, they would have a lengthy walk back to campus after being issued a citation and could potentially get into trouble. Police have also noticed younger students appear “profoundly drunk,” even when they have low blood alcohol contents, because of their lack of experience with alcohol.  SBPD spokesman Capt. Phil Trent attributes this change to circumstances, rather than a “conspiracy.” Trent said Notre Dame student off-campus housing used to be concentrated around Eddy Street and Notre Dame Avenue, as were the bars and night spots for students.  Now, students live in more residential neighborhoods and parties draw more complaints. Student body president Catherine Soler met with the SBPD Thursday night, and said the aim of this meeting was to decrease tensions between the student body and law enforcement officers. Both the University and police recognized the attention to, and punishment for, alcohol related violations this year is different than it has been in the past. “Our hope is that we can get through this weekend without significant incident or conflict, that we can start to build the kinds of communication channels between administration and students and law enforcement where we’re not so much in conflict with one another,” he said. Soler said the student body can expect an e-mail from student government detailing the meeting with SBPD sometime today.  “They are going to continue to do their job, but with a bit more of an understanding of the student’s perspective,” student body president Catherine Soler said after Thursday night’s meeting. “There is definitely going to be more discretion in the situations involving arrests and ticketing.”last_img read more

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Football Bees’ rally against C-NS falls just short

first_imgA minute remained in the half and the Northstars surprised the Bees with an onside kick, recovering it at midfield. Just 11 seconds before intermission, J.J. Razmovski found a streaking Adron Pafford down the right sideline for a 37-yard scoring play.In a span of less than four minutes, a close contest was now a 28-7 game, and B’ville could not afford to fall further behind. Instead, it began to climb back, sparked by a defense that held C-NS without a first down in the third quarter.Mixing in runs and passes from Braden McCard (including a 20-yard tipped pass to Pat May on fourth down, the Bees drove to the one, where Strong scored his second TD of the night.Then, on the first play of the fourth quarter, McCard, from his own 40, threw down the left sideline to Pat May, who caught it, cut back and found the end zone, and the Bees were within a score, 28-21, with plenty of time to catch up.Pinned at its own 13-yard line after the ensuing kickoff, C-NS regrouped, and Razmovski made his three best throws of the night.One was a third-down pass to Mason Ellis that covered 23 yards. Then, on fourth-and-four at the Bees’ 47, Razmovski hit Pafford, who broke tackles on a 37-yard run to set up first-and-goal. Three plays later, Pafford lost his defender on a cut to the middle and Razmovski found him again, the TD covering 12 yards with 4:55 to play.That turned out to be the game-winner because B’ville again responded, McCard throwing a 12-yard TD pass to May with 1:13 left, but an onside kick was smothered by the Northstars, who were able to run out the clock.McCard completed eight of 10 passes for 177 yards and also ran for a career-best 103 yards on 10 carries, while Strong finished with 142 yards on 24 carries. May and Robert Hamm led the defense with seven tackles apiece as Dan Ewald added five tackles and three assists.B’ville (2-2 league, 3-3 overall) visits Fayetteville-Manlius (1-3 league, 2-4 overall) in next Friday’s regular-season finale. Only a win guarantees a post-season berth since a loss creates a three-way tie for third between the Bees, Hornets and the winner of the West Genesee-Rome Free Academy game, and of those three, two will qualify for the playoffs.Share this:FacebookTwitterLinkedInRedditComment on this Story In the past, if the Baldwinsville football team ever had to face a three-touchdown-deficit in the second half, its style of play would almost preclude any idea for a glorious comeback.Yet on Friday night at Pelcher-Arcaro Stadium, the Bees found itself battling back against visiting Cicero-North Syracuse, knowing that if it could complete its rally from a 28-7 hole, it would likely host a first-round Section III Class AA playoff game.B’ville did find the end zone three times – but it wasn’t quite enough as the Northstars parlayed a fourth-quarter scoring drive into a tense 35-28 victory and a chance to grab the Class AA-2 division regular-season title if it beats Utica Proctor next weekend. Both teams arrived at this game with 2-1 league marks, and they would trade scoring drives in the early going, C-NS taking a 7-0 lead, B’ville countering with a strong ground attack anchored by Willie Strong as he scored on a one-yard plunge early in the second quarter.It was still 7-7 when C-NS erupted late in the half. The catalyst was a scoring drive familiar to B’ville fans where the Northstars ran the ball on all 12 plays, with Mike Washington getting 11 of those carries and going the final yard for the TD.By contrast, the next time C-NS had the ball after a fourth-down stop by the defense at the B’ville 38, Washington needed only one play to sprint 62 yards to the end zone, making it 21-7.center_img Tags: Baldwinsvillefootballlast_img read more

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Noel uses family background to excel as senior linebacker at N.C. State

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Rodman Noel played basketball in his driveway, touch football with his friends at nearby Everett (Massachusetts) High School and little bit of baseball, too. In some ways, he was a typical kid. But he and his brothers, Jim and Nerlens, all became Division I athletes. They grew up the sons of Haitian immigrants and blue-collar workers. When they arrived home most nights, the house was empty. Their community helped raise them. Those experiences growing up in Everett fostered his competitive spirit and taught him to be a leader. Together, Rodman, Jim and Nerlens built each other’s competitiveness on the basketball court and on the football field, which Rodman will apply as a senior linebacker for N.C. State’s when it faces Syracuse for a 3 p.m. game in the Carrier Dome on Saturday. Nerlens is starting his first NBA season with the Philadelphia 76ers after starring during his one season at Kentucky in 2012–13. Jim is a graduate assistant at Temple football after being cut by the Seattle Seahawks during the 2013 preseason and Rodman leads the Wolfpack defense with 48 total tackles and an interception through eight games. “Their family’s important,” said John DiBiaso, the head football coach at Everett High School, “they’re brothers and they’ve got to look out for each other.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textBasketball games in the Noel’s driveway ratcheted up the brothers’ competitiveness. But before the driveway, the boys had to go to the park because they had no hoop. The three Noel brothers stayed at the park until late hours. Dorcina Noel, their mother, would demand they come home and when they refused, she brought home a basketball hoop. She put up the hoop so if they stayed out late, at least they were in their own driveway. On the first night they played until 2 a.m.“When it would start to get real competitive, we would start shoving each other. If somebody had the game-winning basket, it would start getting a little physical,” Rodman said. “And the other one would get mad because he called a foul, the other person would think it wasn’t a foul and we would start getting into it.” When Rodman was 10, they’d play basketball at Everett and get rides home from DiBiaso. They played with his son and DiBiaso bought them all chicken nuggets on the way home. “I’d be bringing them home and the lights would all be out, their mother and father would still be working,” said DiBiaso who usually dropped the Noels off between 10 and 11 p.m.Dorcina Noel worked in a hospital and Yonel Noel drove cabs to support the family. The Noel brothers relied on each other. Jim played a “big-brother-slash-father” role to Nerlens and to a Rodman in a lesser degree, DiBiaso said. When all three played on the football team during Nerlens’ freshman year, they’d get to practice at different times. DiBiaso said Jim arrived five minutes early, Rodman on time and Nerlens always 20 minutes late. It prompted DiBiaso to teach them to stick together. What Rodman learned growing up translated at Milford (New York) Academy — a cutthroat prep school for football players who want to improve on and off the field. Milford head coach Bill Chaplick said that making it through Milford speaks to Noel’s competitiveness and toughness. “You’re here with players that this is the last shot in their life and if they don’t make it, they’re not going anywhere,” Chaplick said. “You throw that all in with 55 guys, you’ve got to fight everyday for what you get here and you only get what you earn.”At North Carolina State, head coach Dave Doeren praises Rodman for working off the field to get results on it and calls him a “great preparation guy.”Now Rodman hopes that the late-night basketball games, extra year at Milford and four years at North Carolina State make him the third Noel brother to play a professional sport. It wouldn’t be a coincidence. “It would mean the world to me. I just know that I am blessed — I came from a great family, a great competitive family and I just thank god,” said Noel. “I’m just gonna have to keep working every day.” Comments Published on October 31, 2014 at 12:02 am Contact Chris: [email protected] | @ChrisLibonatilast_img read more

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Can USG combat USC’s mental health stigma?

first_imgFew counselors. Hour-long wait times. General feelings of neglect. Before this year, USC was a campus without a strong culture of mental health awareness. But things might be changing now.In the past couple of months, the Undergraduate Student Government has led a campaign to break down the stigma of mental health across multiple fronts, from an initiative to create a fall semester break to plans for exposing freshmen to mental health awareness programs during orientation. USG President Rini Sampath, one of the biggest supporters of this issue, stated that she had been motivated by the many stories of students on the “brink of some very unfortunate things.”“College is a very difficult place,” Sampath said. “Everyone has [difficulties with] mental health, but there are people who will have mental illness. There is a wide variety and range of what people go through and I think it’s about figuring out how we can help each other out.”Sampath pointed out how, in an effort to counter these statistics, she and USG Director of Wellness Affairs Christine Hasrouni successfully lobbied for the addition of six new counselors at the Engemann Student Health Center a few months ago.“We brought [the issue] to President Nikias, we brought it to Student Affairs, and we said that students are unable to go see counselors because there is a seven-week wait,” Sampath said. “We should be acting proactively instead of reactively to these problems.”Sampath mentioned that one of USG’s current actions is implementing a survey to identify students’ main health concerns.Despite these initiatives, Sampath argued that USG’s main tool in terms of advocacy is passing resolutions, but that ultimately the administration has to implement these policies.“It’s us laying the foundation, but it’s up to the administration if they want to construct the building,” Sampath said. “We’ve had some successes, like our drop deadline [and] Leavey Library renovations, but overall we are looking for support in other topics that might be harder to talk about, like mental health.”Javanne Golob, a staff social worker at the counseling center, said that despite the short amount of time since USG began its initiative, some positive results are already visible.“[USG mental health promotion] is just beginning now,” Golob said. “But I’ve had clients of mine mention that they’ve seen the events or it’s made mental health more a conversation topic on campus, so hopefully it’s starting the conversation and reducing the stigma.”Golob said USG and other student assemblies are succeeding in popularizing the topic of mental health, making it more “campuswide” and not just something “sequestered in the corner” at the Engemann Center. Golob argued that student organizations have the advantage of going beyond the services available at the Engemann Center, and exploring mental health solutions apart from counseling. She also pointed out how USG is promoting self care habits, such as exercise, eating well, connecting socially, sleeping and seeking peer-to-peer support, which can help prevent individual crises.“[The Engemann Center’s Interim Assistant Director of Outreach Services  Dr. Kelly Greco and I] work with USG and a lot of the great student groups to formulate events for the  next coming months so that people can notice the signs of a mental health issue coming up before it turns into a crisis,” Golob said. “So we’re trying. We are a little engine.”On the programming side, this October and November USG’s  Academic Culture Assembly has come to the forefront with its 2015 Mental Health Awareness Month, also known as “Behind the Mask.” Running from Oct. 12 to Nov. 20, Behind the Mask consists of 20 events, many of which are in collaboration with other student assemblies, such as the Black Student Assembly and the Women’s Student Assembly. The events are varied, taking the form of film screenings, student panels, exhibits, karaoke, yoga and even a puppy petting session.Gisella Tan, executive director of the International Student Assembly and one of the month’s organizers, explained that de-stressing workshops are valuable in removing the “stigma” in some cultures that might have different approaches to mental health. She explained that the defunding of certain centers does not help their cause.“I don’t think I can speak for all international students, but our resource center, the Office of International Services, has been severely defunded,” Tan said. “So if you need counseling services, you may have to wait a couple of days. And the counseling services that they offer have been greatly minimized.”But Tan also stated that events such as the de-stressing workshop are not truly effective in generating immediate results.“[These types of events] are more on the symbolic side,” Tan said. “I don’t think that an hour-long event or even a 20 minute yoga would actually help students successfully to de-stress.”She added that these events are more of an opportunity to raise awareness by letting students know about the health services available and fostering self-care.Krystal Chavez, who works in cultural affairs for the Latina/o Student Assembly, also holds awareness to be one of the main goals of Behind the Mask.“What most people don’t realize is that programming events are essentially advocating for things. Without a goal in mind, the event won’t happen,” Chavez said. “We were advocating to the idea that the administration wasn’t doing what they needed to do in helping students.”This advocacy has had positive results on some students. After one discussion, Eesen Sivapalan, a junior majoring in business administration and accounting who attended the event,  praised USG’s efforts.“Not just for the Latino community, but for any minority community on campus, events like these really open up discussion for topics which we wouldn’t normally discuss at home and even amongst our group of friends,” Sivapalan said. “I feel that when it comes to minority groups, things like mental health are topics that are considered taboo in the family, and so because of that, it’s not uncommon for there to be more minority members suffering from mental health issues.”Sivapalan held that progress was definitely being made in raising awareness, and that later generations would have even easier access to the mental health conversation due to a “shrinking” cultural gap.And due to the lack of promotion for health services, Sivapalan said that he is “happy” that USG is helping the student body in ways the administration does not.“The University can do a better job in helping promote the mental health of students,” Sivapalan said. “We have a wait time of seven weeks for us to get an appointment with the counselor, and I feel that that just isn’t fair when we’re paying so much money for tuition.”In fact, Sivapalan mentioned that without USG’s wellness promotion, his opinion on mental health services would have been different.“One student pointed out that you can only get to know what’s going on in your mind when you have a facilitator guide you through your own thought process,” Sivapalan said. “The reason why I want to have an appointment with the counselors is only because of this event and the comments in the discussion here. I think events such as these are an essential part of our student experience.”Now, USG’s biggest concern is what members characterize as an unspoken administrative indifference. Students active in combatting this issue know that their efforts pale against those the University could take.Sampath, for example, explained that USC and USG have made huge strides in terms of mental health awareness in comparison to other campuses. However, she also said that USG at best can raise awareness, create dialogue and start conversations, but it cannot dictate policy.“What we can do as Undergraduate Student Government is be the voice for the students and say, ‘This needs to be taken care of,’” Sampath said. “Because, otherwise, what’s going to happen? This is just going to get brushed under the rug.”last_img read more

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