Month: April 2021

IAWS INVESTS in Scottish training academy

first_imgIAWS Foods UK – the company behind Cuisine de France, Delice de France and La Brea Bakery – has reinforced its commitment to the Scottish market by locating its latest baking academy in Bellshill near Glasgow.The facility, which launched last month, has been designed to become a centre of training and development excellence for all IAWS staff, as well as for its foodservice and retail customers. Incorporated into an existing building at IAWS Foods’ premises in Bellshill, the new academy accommodates the full range of baking and bake-off facilities. Specialist instruction covers all IAWS products, including those sold under the Delice de France, Cuisine de France, Hiestand and La Brea Bakery banners. The aim, says IAWS, is to “ensure that everything, from quality French and artisan breads to Viennoiserie, patisserie and desserts, will be baked to perfection every time”. Attendees are guided on everything from storage to presentation of the company’s products, including merchandising and point of sale. It is in the best commercial interests of both IAWS and its customers to have the company’s products prepared and presented in the best possible light, comments IAWS Foods UK MD Stephen Silvester.Tailor-made trainingHe also emphasises that tailor-made training programmes will be available through the academy. These will cover, for example, baking guidelines; new legislation; product preparation, including use of equipment; storage methods; temperature control; and hygiene. The £250,000-plus project at Bellshill has also involved the development of on-site offices, meeting rooms and storage capacity. The expansion programme has led to further recruitment within the sales, operations and baking academy functions. According to Mr Silvester, workforce numbers have risen from 10 to 60 since IAWS established its presence in Bellshill a decade ago. “The academy will help grow the volume of our business and, by implication, more jobs will come with that,” he adds.It was in the mid-1990s that IAWS Foods established its first academy in Britain – in Southall, London – and another was created several years later at IAWS’ Stone premises in Staffordshire. The new facility at Bellshill, which is capable of training up to a dozen people at one time, has incorporated the best features of the other two, according to Mr Silvester. “It was logical for us to open our third academy in Bellshill,” he comments. “Scotland is the fastest-growing region for IAWS Foods UK – our products have been very well received there and the market is growing. We have made a commitment of manpower and money to Scotland, and the academy is part of that.” With a core range of some 800 products, the group also has products that are unique to the Scottish market, he adds.The opening ceremony at Bellshill was performed on November 10 by local MSP Michael McMahon in front of some 150 guests, including existing and prospective customers. However, several dozen people had already undergone training at the academy in the weeks leading up to its official launch. According to Mr Silvester, many thousands have now attended one or other of the company’s academies in the UK. “We get fantastic feedback from the customers, but also from the staff the companies send for training,” he observes. “We try to make it interesting, informative and very practical for them, with a little bit of humour involved too. Whenever we open a new account, we encourage customers to take up what we consider to be this unique proposition.”IAWS Foods UK’s three academies come under the remit of director of food standards Roger Banfield. An academy manager has yet to be appointed at Bellshill, but he or she will be supported by training and category development staff, whose role will include visiting customers’ premises and offering advice on, for example, presentation and merchandising.Irish connectionIAWS Foods UK is part of Dublin-based IAWS Group – a major food and agri-business concern with operations in Ireland, Britain, continental Europe, Canada and the US. Employing over 3,000 people, the group turned over more than e1,400m in the year to July 31, 2005. Food is the largest division within the group and encompasses brands such as Cuisine de France (retail), Delice de France (foodservice) and US-based artisan bread specialist La Brea Bakery. Divisional turnover in the 2004/05 period increased by 22.6% to just short of e900m, with sales in the UK improving by 13%. IAWS has launched La Brea Bakery in the UK over the last year. According to Mr Silvester, consideration is still being given to the possibility of introducing La Brea Bakery production capacity at its Stone facility in Staffordshire.Earlier this year, IAWS acquired the UK business of Swiss company Hiestand, which makes breads confectionary and savouries. These “niche, gourmet products” are proving particularly popular with hotels, notes Mr Silvester.last_img read more

Read more…

ADM bolsters delivery fleet

first_imgADM Milling (Brentwood, Essex) has wheat flour mills located around the UK and a technical centre in Avonmouth, Bristol. From these mills, the company supplies all the bakery and food manufacturing sectors, from multinational manufacturers to in-store bakeries, caterers and craft bakers.Primary products are a range of white, brown, wholemeal, cake and speciality flours, as well as an extensive range of bakery mixes, ingredients, bran and bakers’ sundries.ADM has recently made a major investment in new delivery vehicles, adding to its existing fleet. It can offer a delivery service ranging from bulk tankers several times a day down to bags stacked in the right place in the bakery.last_img read more

Read more…

Employment law: a balancing act

first_imgEmployment law is predominantly concerned with protecting the rights of wor-kers but it also recognises that businesses require flexibility from their employees. When it comes to changing terms and conditions of employment – and where there is a pressing need for business change – the law will not simply allow the employee to stay on their existing contractual terms forever. The need to allow changes to be made while protecting an employee’s contractual rights is seen as a “balancing act” by the courts. How this process works in action has been helpfully re-stated in the recent case of Scott & Co v Andrew Richardson. The case concerns a change to shift patterns. Scott & Co runs a debt recovery service in Scotland. Richardson was employed to collect debts by Scott & Co. He acted as a door-to-door operative (known as a sheriff officer) and he worked standard daytime hours, with occasional overtime in the evenings when required. A change in the way that debt recovery was carried out in Scotland encouraged Scott & Co to change employee hours in order to move onto a shift system. An emphasis on negotiating repayment, rather than seizing goods, meant that some employees regularly had to work an evening shift rather than doing overtime. Richardson objected to this change.The perils of unilateral change UK employment law doesn’t allow an employer unilaterally to impose changes to an employee’s contract of employment. Normally, any change requires the employee’s agreement. To secure this agreement, employers will normally consult with their employees over suggested changes.Where all else fails and a reluctant minority refuse to agree to a change, an employer can only implement the change by dismissing those employees and offering re-engagement on the new, amended terms. Of course, this approach carries inherent risks. Employees have no obligation to accept; they can choose to claim unfair dismissal instead and an employment tribunal will then have to rule on whether the dismissal, based on the employer’s reasons and approach, was fair or unfair. Such was the case with Richardson. In his view, the move by Scott & Co to a shift system was an excuse not to pay overtime. Although his colleagues largely accepted the proposed change, Richardson held out against it and was ultimately dismissed. The tribunal’s decisionAt the initial tribunal hearing, Richardson succeeded in his claim for unfair dismissal. Scott & Co said that there was a sound business reason for dismissal. Legally this fell into the fair category for dismissal known as “some other substantial reason”, a catch-all provision normally invoked where there is a genuine business need to implement a change that might otherwise result in an unfair dismissal. However, the tribunal disagreed, based on the circumstances. It found that there was no fair reason for dismissal. The employment appeal tribunal overturned that decision and re-emphasised the degree of discretion that an employer has when seeking to re-organise its business. It found that unless a decision to change terms and conditions is “trivial” or “whimsical”, an employer should normally be able to pass the initial stage of proving that there was a potentially fair reason for dismissal.When proving that potentially fair reason, an employer’s commercial discretion over its own business practices will be respected. It must be appreciated, however, that having made out a potentially fair reason for dismissal, an employer must go on to demonstrate that it acted fairly in all circumstances. This is a “balancing act” between the interests of employer and employee. The appeal tribunal went on to consider the factors from previous case law, which indicate whether a dismissal is reasonable in these circumstances. These are likely to include:the benefit to the employer from the changes;whether the dismissal could be considered reasonable in light of the number of employees who accepted the changes;(where relevant) whether a trade union accepted that the change was reasonable and was ready to recommend it. On this point the appeal tribunal decided that Richardson’s case should be sent back to another tribunal for reconsideration. As the consultation process adopted by Scott & Co had convinced Richardson’s colleagues to accept the change, then applying the guidance from the appeal tribunal, it appears that he might have some difficulty in winning his claim the second time around!Practical stepsIn light of the indications given above, how will an employer normally implement contentious changes to terms and conditions of employment? Normally, an employer will engage in a process of consultation to sell the change to employees. This consultation will commonly take place with employees and/or their representatives, allowing the sound business reasons for change to be presented to the workforce and any incentives offered for the change to be explained. Only when consultation is exhausted without full agreement would the remaining employees have their existing contracts terminated upon notice with an offer of re-engagement upon the revised terms. Clive Day is a solicitor at Eversheds LLP.last_img read more

Read more…

Hoshizaki

first_imgThe full range of Hoshizaki’s compact counter fridges and freezers are now available with drawers. Depending on storage requirements, doors and drawers can be supplied.The fridges and freezers are constructed entirely from solid stainless steel with 304-grade stainless steel interiors, promising long-term durability and efficiency, says the company.Temperatures are adjustable between +12°C and -6°C on the fridges and -7°C and -25°C on the freezers, allowing different types of storage.last_img read more

Read more…

Lamination for the nation

first_imgGerman bakery machine manufacturer Fritsch has revealed the latest addition to its range – the Fritsch Laminator 300. It has been designed for bakers who require automation and better quality in the production of dough sheets.The Laminator 300 is tailored for bakeries that produce between 200 and 1,000kg of dough per hour, and as much as 1,500kg during block production times. It has a net dough sheet width of 60cm and a maximum belt speed of six metres per minute. It can also be adapted to handle the production of puff pastry blocks as well as soft pre-proved dough for products such as ciabatta.[http://www.fritsch.info]last_img read more

Read more…

3663 adds to Whites

first_imgFoodservice company 3663 is adding a number of products to its Whites range. Three new pavé loaves – perene, walnut and multigrain – are based on a rustic-style French bread.They are suitable for sandwiches or to accompany soups. They need to defrost for 90 minutes at room temperature and are then baked for 11 minutes at 200?C. All are delivered in 9x450g packs.Whites has also added a Belgian chocolate cheesecake to its line-up. The cheesecake is sold frozen and is pre-cut into 14 portions. Each portion should be defrosted for two to three hours in a refrigerator at around 5ºC.[http://www.3663.co.uk]last_img read more

Read more…

Reporting in

first_imgAlex WaughDirector, nabimOver recent months we have all relaxed as, despite problems with the quality of the UK harvest, wheat prices have fallen from their peak levels of a year ago. Since early December, however, the wheat market has rebounded, moving up by 15-20%.What is going on?It boils down to a familiar story: markets tend to look forwards rather than backwards, and the future is uncertain. Although there was a record world wheat crop in 2008, plantings are lower for 2009. The International Grains Council estimates a fall of 1.6% globally, and trade estimates are for an 8% decline in the UK. So far, crops appear to have wintered well. However, in the southern hemisphere, Argentina is in the grip of a drought, which has reduced the overall harvest of many crops and reminded the market that supply and demand remain delicately balanced. Wheat stocks rose slightly after the 2008 harvest, but stocks of rice and maize remain at, or close to, record lows.Essentially, if there is a significant problem during the growing season for northern hemisphere crops, it is likely that there will again be a deficit in production. The sharp decline in the value of Sterling is also unhelpful, and has increased the cost of imports sharply since the autumn.That is why current quotations for new-crop (October/November) 2009 wheat are higher than today’s values. We can expect a nervous and volatile wheat market in the coming months, depending on the news about weather and crop conditions around the world. With luck, all will turn out well and prices will remain close to current levels. If things go awry, however, we had better be prepared for the return of higher prices, febrile markets and political intervention, as governments seek to secure food supplies.last_img read more

Read more…

Commoditisation danger for gluten-free breads

first_imgA leading gluten-free bakery supplier has warned that the category could become commoditised if supermarkets continue to push their own-label products.Nutrition Point which owns DS (dietary specials) bread and Trufree snacks and biscuits believes gluten-free faces a similar predicament to mainstream bread 10 years ago, before value and more diverse brands returned to the category. MD Chris Hook said there was already a nearly 70:30 split between own-label and brands, which was set to increase. Hook has refused to supply own-label products, while a few of the firm’s own products have even been delisted.”I’m beginning to feel a little bit vulnerable and am increasingly being expected to justify our existence,” he said. “We’re doing a lot of innovation, but the retailers say they want these products under own label why would I hand over the recipe and intellectual property rights?”Paddy Cronin, commercial director of United Central Bakeries, which produces both own-label and branded gluten-free bakery products, including the Genius range, said there was a place for both, as long as brands offered a point of difference. But he added that a degree of commoditisation could bring prices down. “Part of the problem is that production is in batch quantities, so you cannot get the same efficiencies as standard products.”Jeremy Woods, MD of Mrs Crimbles, had no plans to supply own-label. He said: “My job is to promote my brand and product range any category needs strong brands, as consumers want choice, and there’s still a role for them if you have good products.”last_img read more

Read more…

Fox’s makes crisp move on Rocky

first_imgFox’s Biscuits has added a new biscuit bar to its Rocky range. The new Rocky Crispy Crunch has been described by the firm as a “rugged and textured biscuit bar”, which is covered in milk chocolate and contains wafer and biscuits bits.It joins Rocky Chocolate and Rocky Caramel in a bid to drive further growth in the chocolate biscuit bar (CBB) sector.According to Fox’s CBBs command the largest share of the sweet biscuit market at 26% (Nielsen MAT to w/e 12.06.10).Rachel Moffatt, brands sector director for Fox’s, added: “Following its highly successful relaunch last year, the current Rocky portfolio continues to grow in popularity, up 6.5% Nielsen MAT to w/e 12.06.10, whichhas led to the development of Rocky Crispy Crunch.” The launch will be supported by in-store media, price promotions and PR activity.last_img read more

Read more…

Snow still causing problems in Scotland

first_imgAlthough much of the snow has melted in the south, bakeries in the north of England and Scotland have continued to struggle with the elements.“We are quite used to dealing with snow up here but the severity and duration of this recent blast has taken everyone by surprise,” said Lewis McLean of McLean’s Highland Bakery in Morayshire.“We had about 8-10 inches of snow in our car park, last week. Out of 130 staff only three did not make it into work, even one of those whose car slid off the road and crashed, made it to work the next day on the bus.”He added: “We’ve managed to help quite a few local shops by supplying them with extra stock as deliveries from the south had been running late or were stuck.” André Sarafilovic of Stephens Bakery in Dunfermline, commented: “Miraculously we are getting all of the products out and customers are buying everything they can get their hands on. “When this type of things happen it brings out real community spirit. A local farmer even came over without being asked and cleared our delivery yard – it’s amazing what people will do for a steakbridie!”last_img read more

Read more…

Probiotics reach UK baking industry

first_imgProbiotic bread and cakes could be on UK shelves within the year, potentially stealing share from dairy cabinets.Products containing traditional probiotics are usually in the chilled, short-life dairy category such as yoghurts, but US manufacturers have started adding probiotics to dry goods and Orlando Baking has just launched what it claims to be the first probiotic bread.Traditional probiotics good bacteria which can deliver health benefits have not been able to survive extreme temperatures, which meant baking or freezing foods containing the cultures was not possible. However, Ganeden Biotec’s new probiotic strain GanedenBC30 is a powder that claims to overcome these problems and can be used in products such as muffins, cereal bars and extruded products.UK-based ingredients firm Cornelius has recently started distributing GanedenBC30 in the UK and reports plenty of interest from bakery firms. “People are serious about using it,” said Joy Thomas, business manager, health and food, at Cornelius. “It shouldn’t be too long before a bakery product is launched.”last_img read more

Read more…

Maple Leaf fails to find buyer

first_imgMaple Leaf Bakery has confirmed its closure within the next few months, as a deal with a potential buyer fell through to save its Walsall site, according to the Express and Star.The bakery manufacturer, which has been based on Raleigh Street since the 1800s, said it was in talks with a buyer last month during a 90-day consulation period to try and preserve the company’s longstanding history at the West Midlands location.However, a total of 236 employees felt the blow during the Christmas period as the company announced the buyout was not to go ahead, with the bakery due to close between February and March, reported the paper.The move has come despite the Canada Bread-owned Maple Leaf Bakery announcing a 3% increase in third-quarter profits in 2011.Paul Clipson, HR director at Maple Leaf Bakery, told British Baker last year that the business would be focusing on its speciality bread brands, such as The New York Bakery Co, for 2012, which helped accumulate more than £80m profits for the third quarter to 30 September 2011, compared to £78.2m in the previous year.last_img read more

Read more…

Governor Holcomb, First Lady test negative for COVID-19

first_img Twitter Governor Holcomb, First Lady test negative for COVID-19 (Photo supplied/State of Indiana) Governor Eric Holcomb and First Lady Janet Holcomb have tested negative for COVID-19.The Governor and First Lady began quarantining on Tuesday, Nov. 17, after several members of their security detail tested positive for COVID-19 and they were determined to be close contacts of the infected individuals.The couple received both an Abbott rapid test and a nasopharyngeal PCR test, and had negative results on both. They are doing well and are not experiencing symptoms.Per the advice of Indiana Health Commissioner Dr. Kris Box and Chief Medical Officer Dr. Lindsay Weaver, the Governor and First Lady will not be tested again unless they develop symptoms.They will continue their 14-day quarantine and can resume a normal schedule with masking and social distancing on Tuesday, Dec. 1. Pinterest Facebook WhatsApp WhatsApp Previous articleSilver Alert for 12-year-old Elkhart girl has been cancelledNext articleMan hospitalized after being struck by vehicle in South Bend Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. Twitter By Jon Zimney – November 21, 2020 1 274 CoronavirusIndianaLocalNews Facebook Google+ Google+ Pinterestlast_img read more

Read more…

Tis the season for house fires

first_img By Jon Zimney – December 16, 2020 0 151 Google+ Tis the season for house fires Facebook Pinterest Google+ Twitter Pinterest (Jon Zimney/95.3 MNC) It’s the time of the year when you may be decking your halls with lights, or putting up a Christmas tree. But, it’s also the time of year when it gets a bit chilly, which means you may be lighting a fire or bringing out that space heater.“We do see an increase in fire and burn injuries related to decorations, and more cooking, and the heating appliances that people use,” said Director of Public Education with the National Fire Protection Association, Andrea Vastis, when asked about fires this time of year.She said a good rule of thumb to have is a 3 feet rule.“Keep your tree three feet away from a heat source, anything that can catch fire,” she said. “Keep those portable space heaters 3 feet away from curtains, or bedding.”That rule also applies to kids and pets when you’re cooking, in case they try to grab or bump anything onto a stove or open flame.Just last Saturday, a house on Greer Dell Road in Indy caught fire while a man was asleep on the couch, the smoke alarm woke him, and he was able to get out. He told the Indianapolis Fire Department he believes the fire started because of a space heater in the back bedroom.Then on Monday, a woman’s home caught fire. Kyrsten Doyle said it was because of a candle she left burning on her vanity. She was downstairs with her son when she noticed the smoke.“You have maybe two to three minutes to get out of a home,” Vastis said. “Unfortunately, today’s fabrics and furniture burn hotter and faster. Once that fire starts, once you hear the sound of that smoke alarm it is time to get out.”She shared a few tips on how to avoid fires this holiday season:Make sure your tree isn’t dryOnly use outside lights outsideMake sure none of the chords you’re plugging in have frayed wiresStand by your pan when cookingHave a meeting place outside your home in case of a fireDon’t run back insideCall 911 once you’re outside the home Twitter WhatsApp WhatsApp IndianaLocalNews Facebook Previous articleU.S. Senate confirms Kirsch to replace Amy Coney Barrett on U.S. 7th Circuit Court Of AppealsNext articleFrontline Hoosier Guardsmen receive COVID-19 vaccination Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney.last_img read more

Read more…

News story: New protection against identity fraud for company directors

first_imgCompany directors are twice as likely to be victims of identity fraud, research shows New laws will allow directors to remove their personal address from the company register whilst still ensuring transparency at Companies House Protection will help to ensure the UK continues to be one of the best places in the world to start a business – a key part of our Industrial Strategy Under the new laws, directors can replace their personal addresses with an alternative one, like a company address, where they can be contacted to ensure companies meet their legal requirements.Currently, personal addresses can only be removed when Companies House and the relevant authorities judge there is a serious risk of violence or intimidation as a result of the company’s work.The new laws will also ensure transparency in legal information as public authorities such as the police, the insolvency service and the pension regulator will still be able to access directors’ information, such as their personal address.The laws will come into force by the end of summer 2018. New laws to help protect company directors from identity fraud and personal harm will be introduced by the Government today (22 February).The new laws will enable company directors to remove their personal addresses from the UK’s official company register on Companies House. Directors must still provide their business address as a legal requirement.This comes in response to reports that fraudsters are using this publicly available information to pose as company directors to buy products online. There are also concerns the information is leaving company directors vulnerable to violence and intimidation.They are twice as likely to be the victims of identity fraud, with company directors being victims in one in five recorded cases, according to research by fraud prevention organisation Cifas.These new regulations will also help to ensure people feel safe when setting up a new business by protecting directors from identity fraud.Business Minister Andrew Griffiths said:center_img Through our Industrial Strategy we have set our blueprint for ensuring we build on our reputation as one of the best places in the world to start and grow a business. These new laws will protect new and existing business owners from potential harm and identity fraud, while ensuring we maintain our high standards of corporate transparency.last_img read more

Read more…

News story: Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman of Saudi Arabia’s visit, March 2018

first_img first joint executive committee on healthcare memorandum of understanding on clean energy United Kingdom and Saudi Arabia announces new deals in entertainment, sport and creative industries UK-Saudi Arabia partnership to boost livelihoods and economic development in poorest countries Foreign Secretary’s remarks alongside Saudi Arabian Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir the Prime Minister jointly hosts UK-Saudi Arabia Strategic Partnership Council inaugural meeting Announcements Find out more: Britain’s relationship with Saudi Arabia begins a new chapter. Saudi Arabia has also set out Vision 2030, a roadmap to open up the country’s economy over the next 15 years. This will provide opportunities for British businesses in sectors including education, entertainment and healthcare where they have world-class expertise. It also includes plans for Saudi Arabia to become a global investment powerhouse and the Crown Prince’s visit will help explore ways in which Saudi Arabia can build on its investment in the UK in sectors such as infrastructure.British Ambassador Simon Collis talks about the ties between our 2 countriesSaudi Crown Prince VisitMore about the Crown Prince’s visitOverview of the visit Crown Prince concludes his 3-day visit to the UK United Kingdom-Saudi Arabia Joint Communiquécenter_img His Royal Highness Mohammed bin Salman has visited the UK for the first time since he became Crown Prince in June 2017 and since Saudi Arabia started a major programme of domestic reforms. Saudi Arabia is amongst the largest political, diplomatic and economic power in the Middle East, and the visit ushered in a new era in our bilateral relations with one of our oldest friends in the region.Mohammed bin Salman visits the UKMbs visits the UKThe Crown Prince’s visit built on the Prime Minister’s visit to Saudi Arabia in November 2017. It will help to enhance our co-operation in tackling international challenges such as terrorism, extremism, the conflict and humanitarian crisis in Yemen and other regional issues such as Iraq and Syria. Introductory information Prime Minister Theresa May looks ahead to the visit Saudi reformer Mohammed Bin Salman deserves our support: Foreign Secretary’s articlelast_img read more

Read more…

News story: Pubs Code Adjudicator (PCA) Bulletin August 2018

first_img PCA Bulletin August 2018 This bulletin provides information relating to: the PCA’s initial response to the first Pubs Code compliance reports submitted by pub companies the PCA’s questionnaire for tied pub tenants on the Market Rent Only (MRO) option the publication of monthly MRO data by pub companies regulated by the Pubs Code a call to action to tied pub tenants on the issue of dilapidations the PCA’s new Intelligence and Compliance Manager the PCA’s tied pub tenant survey 2018 how to find out more about the Pubs Code and the role of the PCA If you use assistive technology (such as a screen reader) and need aversion of this document in a more accessible format, please email [email protected] tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use. This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology. Request an accessible format. PDF, 153KB, 3 pageslast_img read more

Read more…

News story: Matt Hancock warns of dangers of social media on children’s mental health

first_img Mental health is just as important as physical health and should be treated as such. I recognise there is concern amongst parents about the impact of social media on their children’s mental health so I am conducting a thorough evidence review and will draw up advice to help empower parents and provide clarity. Secretary of State for Health and Social Care Matt Hancock has issued an urgent warning on the potential dangers of social media on children’s mental health, stating that the threat of social media on mental health is similar to that of sugar on physical health.He confirmed that the Chief Medical Officer (CMO), Professor Dame Sally Davies, is reviewing the impact that excessive social media can have on children’s mental health.The CMO will draw up guidance to help parents ensure children don’t use social media in a way that harms their mental health.The guidance will include what age a child should be allowed to sign up to a social media account, and how often they should have access.The CMO’s review will also cover: cyberbullying online gaming where there is a social media aspect sleep problems problematic internet use, also known as ‘internet addiction’ Chief Medical Officer Professor Dame Sally Davies said:center_img Dame Sally will publish interim findings from the review in December.Evidence shows that children who spend more than 3 hours using social networking websites on a school day are twice as likely to report high or very high scores for mental ill-health.The government has made children and young people’s mental health a top priority in the NHS, and is half way through a major programme to improve access to specialist NHS services, supported by £1.4 billion of funding.While the Health and Social Care Secretary welcomes the progress some social media companies have made, there is much more to do.Next year, the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) will work with the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) to launch an online awareness campaign to raise awareness of all existing information and tools for parents on limiting their children’s screen time.Matt Hancock is also continuing to engage with his ministerial colleagues at DCMS and the Home Office around their upcoming Online Harms white paper.The Secretary of State for Health and Social Care said: Overwhelmingly technology is a force for good, but we are seeing more and more evidence that children using social media sites for hours on end each day is having a detrimental impact on their mental health. I want to empower parents to keep their children safe in the digital age which is why I’ve asked the Chief Medical Officer to draw up helpful guidance to allow them to make an informed choicelast_img read more

Read more…

News story: Automated design for a more efficient railway: apply for funding

first_img the competition opens on 22 October 2018 and the deadline for applications is at midday on 19 December 2018 a briefing event will be held on 1 November 2018 in London, where you can find out more about the competition and how to make a quality application total project costs must be between £50,000 and £200,000 projects can last between 6 months and one year businesses could get up to 70% of their costs All projects must show how they build on existing automated design technology and work in a simulated rail infrastructure design environment.Competition information Figures show that around 1.7 billion passengers use the UK’s railways every year. This number has more than doubled in the last 20 years – requiring innovative ways to design railway infrastructure that will support growth in future capacity.Working with Network Rail, Innovate UK has up to £300,000 for businesses with projects to fast-track automated design. The aim is to build safer and higher-capacity railway infrastructure, save money and improve services.Long-term planning and capacityPlanning for the long-term future of the UK’s railways involves navigating a complex range of systems.As well as crossing many different types of terrain and land uses, there are underlying considerations such as stock and track maintenance, bridges and tunnels. Importantly, planning must reflect passenger need.This competition is looking for ways to make automated design more efficient, allowing Network Rail to accelerate new designs, explore long-term performance and assess demand.Building on existing technologyThe competition is open to industrial research projects as well as experimental development projects that are closer to market.Projects should automate the design of at least one of the following: track layout overhead line electrification traction power supply system signalling systems other railway infrastructure not mentioned here Find out more about this competition and apply.last_img read more

Read more…

Speech: How we make public health fit for the future

first_imgSensible people, the British public – we should listen to them more often.I think what it proves to me is that if there is nannying to be done, then let’s do it really, really well, but as a child grows up, and transitions into adolescence and then adulthood, we must be crystal clear with them: they are active participants in their own health.And that’s exactly how we should treat them.I do not like the phrase ‘nanny state’, like some critics say, but what I do like is an active state with active citizens.So personalised prevention means the government, both local and national, working with the NHS, to put prevention at the heart of our decision-making.And we want to hear from you: your experiences, your ideas – the consultation on the prevention green paper runs until next month.Because for prevention to succeed, and improve the nation’s health over the next decade, everyone has a contribution to make.Making healthier choices for ourselves and our families – eating well, staying active, being smoke-free, and taking care of our mental health.Laying the foundations for good health throughout our lives.Investing in and building up that asset that will allow us to live happy, healthy, fulfilled lives.Only by working together can we achieve this vision.Only by treating health as a shared responsibility between an active state with active citizens.All of the constituent parts: local authorities, national government, the NHS, communities, individuals, everybody in this room, everybody who believes in the power of public health, playing their part.All of those marginal gains – that’s the margin of victory.That’s how we move from dealing with the consequences of poor health to promoting the conditions for good health.That’s how we finally make the NHS a National Health Service rather than a National Hospital Service.Because we’re all on the same team.We all want the same thing: a Team GB, that’s there for everyone, where every child can grow up healthy, where everyone is treated like an individual.That’s the future of public health, and that’s what I believe we can achieve if we work together. Good morning.What a wonderful theatre. It’s refreshing to be in a building where everything works – and everyone gets along.They tell me that when the construction work here is completed, the new Warwick Arts Centre will have more space, more facilities, and be more accessible – essentially it will be: bigger, better and fit for the future.Today, I’d like to talk to you about how we make public health fit for the future, what we need to do to build on our success – and we’ve had some huge successes that should be celebrated – but also the work we still need to do – the challenges and opportunities of the next decade.Because I believe the 2020s is going to herald a fundamental shift in how we think of health, especially public health: proactive, predictive, personalised prevention – that’s the future of public health.And, I’d like to start with the story of a great British victory against the odds – don’t worry this isn’t about Brexit – it’s the story behind Team GB’s complete and utter domination of elite cycling.Now, in 2002, the team had won just one solitary Olympic gold medal in its 76-year history.But over the next decade, they won 8 gold medals at 3 Olympics – they transformed British cycling from an international laughing stock to world leaders – everyone wanted to imitate.And they did it by the theory of marginal gains.Team GB worked out that if you broke down all the constituent parts that go into elite cycling, if you can improve each one by just 1%, then add it all together: that’s your margin of victory. That’s how you achieve success.Now, I use this example because the whole story of public health is one of marginal gains.We’ve always been driven by the data. And we must continue to be driven by the data and make decisions based on evidence whether it’s on sugar, vaccination or opioids – 3 things I will return to.But the other reason I use the example of cycling is because public health is also made up of so many constituent parts: national government, local authorities, the NHS, employers, and, most importantly, individuals.Of course, funding is important, and I will always fight for fair funding for health and social care, and I will always fight for local government, like I did in the Spending Round, because nobody knows your communities, and their needs, better than you.But public health is about so much more than just the public health grant: it’s about the whole system working together, and travelling in the same direction.Because the big stuff, the easier stuff, has been done: on smoking, on immunisation, on HIV – even on clean air.The only way forward is one of marginal gains, gradual improvements, hard-fought progress. So many of you have played a role in achieving these gains.Thanks to our concerted efforts on smoking – legislation and education – we now have one of the lowest smoking rates in Europe.50 years ago, 1 in 2 adults smoked. Now, less than 1 in 6 adults smoke in England.Yet, for the 14% of adults who do still smoke, it’s the leading cause of illness and early death, and we know the less well-off you are, the more likely you are to smoke, exacerbating existing health inequalities.So how do we get that 14% closer to zero?Our prevention green paper has set an ambition for England to be smoke-free by 2030.Ten years to get people to give up cigarettes or switch to less-harmful alternatives.It’s a big ask, but I’m confident we can do it – through a proactive approach to prevent young people from taking up smoking, and through personalised support to help persistent smokers kick the habit.Personalised prevention: this must be the guiding principle of public health in the 2020s.And to achieve it we must harness the predictive power of genomics, and the data-crunching power of AI so we can get to people before they have a problem, so we can prevent bad luck or bad choices leading to bad outcomes.That’s the reason we’re going to review the NHS Health Check programme, not to scrap it or remove it, but to see how we can improve it, how we can use tech and data to target people more effectively. There has long been a debate about whether this programme is good value for money and what we are saying with this review is that we want to look at making sure the money we do spend is better targeted.Now, of course, when it comes to clean air, that’s a global challenge that requires a global response, and the UK has taken a global lead with the Clean Air Strategy we launched earlier this year: an ambitious, 25-year, cross-government plan to improve our health by improving our environment.But when it comes to the other 2 big public health challenges of the next decade – obesity and mental health – then personalisation, more targeted interventions and more tailored support is how we achieve those marginal gains.It’s how we succeed in our goal to help people live healthier, happier lives.And this is how we do it: starting in childhood – actually even before a child is born, genomics and AI can help us diagnose and treat rare diseases while they are still in the womb, so they are born healthy.We use predictive prevention to reach the parents who need help with infant feeding and nutrition.We use opt-in data from smart devices and wearables to identify which children need more help with physical activity, which children may be at risk of mental health problems.I know sometimes it sounds like I think technology and data is all that matters. But it only matters because we care about people. Better data and smarter tech can help us get to them faster, but tech can’t replace people. Face to face, human interventions will always be the most effective way to help young people, particularly with those children not lucky enough to be born into safe and loving homes.To give every child the best possible start in life we need to fundamentally change the way we think about health – it’s not a problem to patch up when things go wrong. It’s an asset, a foundation to build on, something to protect and nurture, something society must invest in for every child along with good housing, a strong economy, and well-paid work, because good health is what makes everything else in life possible.When we have it, we take it for granted. But when we don’t…As Health Secretary, I’ve met with many parents of seriously ill children and it’s clear there’s nothing more painful than seeing your child in pain. But what’s also at the forefront of those parents’ minds is all the opportunities their child is going to miss out on as they grow up – all the normal things we take for granted.If we can prevent ill health, if we can promote good health, then we give every child the chance to fulfil their potential in life.That must be our goal.That is both the challenge and the opportunity we face in public health over the next decade.So strong action to take excess calories, salt and sugar out of our children’s diets – like the successful sugar levy on soft drinks has done.Strong action against manufacturers and advertisers so they can’t bombard young brains with junk food messages.Tough action against social media companies and tech firms to remove suicide and self-harm content, and tackle the spread of anti-vaccination propaganda.And even tougher action to stop Britain’s opioid crisis becoming any worse – and I don’t use that word lightly. When 1 in 10 adults in England are on opioids, that’s a crisis.Of course, painkillers have an important role to play, but the first duty of public health must be to protect the public.We can’t afford to be complacent. We’ve all seen the devastation opioids have caused in America’s heartland.We can not let that happen here. It is our job to prevent this problem from escalating.So I’m extremely grateful for the PHE inquiry. Your recommendations, your evidence on painkillers and anti-depressants will inform the actions we take to tackle this head-on.The report published this week was very important and will mark a milestone in the attitude we take to over-medicalisation. The report was assured and based on evidence but also clear so that the public can understand. It backs up our own anecdotal evidence that there is a problem that must be tackled, and tackle it we will.So all of those things taken together – children’s diets, social media harms, anti-vax, opioids – should and are being led by national government, but that’s not going to be enough.We can’t tax and legislate our way out of childhood obesity.We certainly can’t tax and legislate away the mental health problems our young people face.They’re part of the armoury, yes, but they’re not a silver bullet.Because at the heart of it we’re talking about changing human behaviour. And if you want to change the way people act, then you need to understand the way people think.The Department of Health and Social Care has polled people across the country on prevention, from all age groups, from all backgrounds, so we can understand what the great British public think, and what they expect from us.And there were 2, clear, overriding messages: the overwhelming majority of people believe the responsibility for their health lies with them – the individual, not the state. I think this is a good thing and should underpin our approach – we must do more to empower people to look after their healthcenter_img that our efforts on prevention must be focused on childrenlast_img read more

Read more…

Intersnack buys KP Snacks business

first_imgUnited Biscuits has sold its KP Snacks business to Intersnack in a deal believed to be worth between £400m and £500m.In a joint announcement this morning (5 December), the biscuit manufacturer said the two companies had signed an agreement for the County Durham-based firm to acquire the snacks business for an undisclosed sum.The transaction is expected to be complete during the first quarter of 2013.The move means Intersnack will acquire such brands as McCoy’s, Hula Hoops, KP Nuts and Skips, as well as Phileas Fogg, Space Raiders, Nik Naks and Wheat Crunchies. In addition, the transaction includes KP’s UK manufacturing facility and a head office, among other assets.UB will retain ownership of its baked bagged snack brands manufactured in its biscuit factories, including Mini Cheddars and Twiglets.David Fish, group non-executive chairman at UB, said: “KP Snacks is an excellent fit into Intersnack’s existing operations. This exciting deal ensures the KP brands continue as part of a major European snacks business, which gives them the scale and support needed in a competitive marketplace. It also allows UB to concentrate its attention solely on continuing to develop and grow its baked biscuit and snack product range.”Maarten Leerdam, executive chairman, Intersnack, said: “We are very pleased to be teaming up with KP Snacks, which represents a strong and highly complementary fit with the Intersnack family of leading businesses throughout Europe. Intersnack is a strong believer in the power of iconic, local hero brands, and we aim to leverage these strengths for further expansion. As a privately-owned company, we operate our business with a long-term view. As such, the joint know-how of KP Snacks and Intersnack will drive the development of these iconic brands.”KP Snacks reported an annual turnover of £280m, as well as consistent top- and bottom-line growth over the last five years, and employs approximately 1,500 members of staff. British Baker reported on UB’s decision to separate the snacks business back in August, after the company steadily denied related rumours. Nick Bunker, formerly president of Kraft Foods UK/Ireland, was appointed as chief executive of KP Snacks in the same month.Intersnack is a European manufacturer of savoury snacks, producing such brands as Pom-Bear crisps.last_img read more

Read more…

FSA warns levels of cancer-chemical underestimated

first_imgThe level of public exposure to the cancer-inducing chemical acrylamide could be higher than previously thought, due to people ignoring manufacturer cooking instructions.According to research by the Food Standards Agency (FSA), public knowledge of acrylamide is poor and cooking instructions are often ignored or glanced over. This undermines previous estimations of acrylamide consumption, which are based on manufacture instructions being followed.Acrylamide forms when high-starch foods such as bread and biscuits are cooked. The concentration of the chemical increases with cooking length and temperature and the FSA advised bread should only be lightly toasted.It has been linked to nerve and reproductive system damage as well as cancer. However, the European Food Standards Agency (EFSA) risk assessment, published 4 June, 2015, concluded concentrations in food only posed a cancer threat.There is no legal limit for acrylamide in food, though an EU limit of 0.1 μg/L exists for drinking water. European Commission (EC) ‘indicative values’ also exist for food groups considered to contribute most to dietary acrylamide exposure to advise manufacturers on acceptable levels in their products.The FSA said: “Reducing acrylamide levels in food will not be easy, as acrylamide forms naturally in some foods when they are cooked or heat-treated.“There are many variables that can impact on the final level of acrylamide in a given food, ranging from crop variety, storage conditions, agronomic factors, seasonal variation and then the processing or cooking conditions.”ReducedAccording to the report, acrylamide could be reduced by reducing the quantity of asparagine, an amino acid which turns into acrylamide during cooking, in food.The FSA suggested it could take a long time to develop low-asparagine crops but that countries which allowed genetic modification have an advantage. It said the USA had already developed and passed as safe a low-acrylamide producing genetically engineered potato.For the baking industry, reducing acrylamide in bread and toast might be made possible by asparagine-consuming strains of baker’s yeast. Canada-based Renaissance Ingredients has been selecting non-genetically engineered strains which it claims can reduce acrylamide levels in bread and toast by an average of 80%.last_img read more

Read more…

Essex flour miller ADM sets new world record

first_imgEssex-based ADM Milling appears to have smashed the world record for the fastest time to turn wheat into 13 loaves of bread. A seven-strong ‘field to loaf’ team successfully completed the challenge in 12 minutes 42.32 seconds – beating the previous record of 16 minutes and 30.83 seconds.The result is now pending authentication from the Guinness World Records.British Baker’s sales manager Sam White, who witnessed the event held in a field at Codhamhall in Brentwood, Essex this week, said: “The team only had two attempts at the record. The first one failed as they did not mill enough flour to produce 13 loaves, which had to be edible, so everyone was on tenterhooks the second time around.“We were delighted when they beat the record. A huge cheer went up.”The event, attended by 50 baking industry representatives, was held in aid of Great Ormond Street Hospital.ADM partnered with the London hospital’s children’s charity earlier this year and aims to raise£100,000 to fund an enclosed isolation recovery bay in the hospital’s new post-anaesthetic care unit, due to open in 2017.VIDEO LINK: British Baker’s Sam ‘combines’ business with pleasure at ADM’s world record field-to-loaf challengelast_img read more

Read more…

Renshaw expands into Australian market

first_imgUK-based sugarcraft brand Renshaw Professional is continuing its overseas expansion with the opening of an Australian operation.While the business has supplied leading Australian grocery retailers with own-label products for three to four years, the brand made its debut Down Under last month.Renshaw has produced 18 lines specifically for the Australian market, and is using third-party warehousing and a dedicated sales resource to market the range.The company has 30 cake decorators representing the brand across Australia, with products already featuring online on Cake TV, and more than 30 members of the Australian Cake Decorating Network visiting the Renshaw Academy in Liverpool to gain further knowledge on the products.Dedicated digital media, competitions, trade shows and advertising will support the Australian roll-out.The Renshaw brand launched into the US and Canada in 2016 and is using this experience as a blueprint for the Australian launch. Renshaw, which has a dedicated warehouse and offices just outside New York in Rockaway, New Jersey, has recently relaunched 45 lines in the US. The company said the activity has resulted in its highest-ever monthly US sales in November.In the UK, the company launched eight new sugarpastes last month ahead of a global roll-out. The line-up includes Petal paste for fine detail, modelling paste, white chocolate modelling paste, milk chocolate modelling paste, and Extra for covering deep cakes. Three confectionery covering icings are being launched for the B2B market – caramel, white and milk chocolate. In October, Renshaw owner Real Good Food reported a £5.5m annual profit from its Cake Decoration division.last_img read more

Read more…

Steve Dawson resigns from Real Good Food board

first_imgSteve Dawson – who helped turn around the Bahlsen US business – is to leave his non-executive position on the board of Renshaw owner Real Good Food (RGF).Dawson joined the board as an independent non-executive director just under a year ago, when RGF described him as an “experienced specialist in food and beverage brands in the UK and in North America”. He was previously interim CEO of Bahlsen North America, where he stabilised the business and cut operating losses by two-thirds.RGF appointed Dawson as it looked to turn the business around following a troubled period that included the exit of founder and executive chairman Pieter Totté, a string of profit warnings and concerns over its corporate governance.Dawson became CEO of the US division of desserts supplier Pots & Co in July, and told RGF that this commitment meant he would have to quit his non-exec role. He will serve on the board until 31 October.“The board would like to thank Steve for his contribution as a non-executive director over the past 12 months and wish him well with his future endeavours,” stated RGF, adding that the process of finding a replacement was under way.RGF recently announced its full-year results and revealed plans for the development of its cake decorations division.last_img read more

Read more…