Month: July 2019

SAINTS have announced an exclusive fouryear partn

first_imgSAINTS have announced an exclusive four-year partnership with Robinsons Brewery; one of the UK’s oldest family brewers.Robinsons will continue to be the club’s Official Drinks Partner – a position they have held since 2012.The significant deal will see the Stockport Brewer have exclusive ‘pouring rights’ within the 18,000-seater stadium whilst continuing to brew the rugby club’s popular own Saints Gold; a 4% ABV golden ale.Speaking about the partnership, Mike Rush, Saints Chief Executive, said: “We are really pleased to continue our excellent relationship with Robinsons Brewery.“They are a proactive and a much-valued partner whose values closely align to our own.“Since we moved into the stadium we have worked together to bring innovative products and value for money for our fans and customers. The extension of the contract signifies how pleased both parties are with the relationship.“We look forward to enhancing that over the next four years.”Ben Robinson, Director of Sales for Robinsons Brewery, added: “We’re very proud of our ongoing relationship with St. Helens R.F.C.; one of the biggest club sides in the world.“This partnership allows us to continue to grow the presence of our beers and the commitment and significant investment from both parties is a sign of our long-term ambition in the region. We look forward to growing an even greater relationship with the club and their fans over the coming years.”The new deal will also see Robinsons working closely with Halewood Wines & Spirits, the international drinks company behind Crabbie’s Alcoholic Ginger Beer – St. Helens official away kit partner – for the first time.Ben added: “It’s great to see two North West companies coming together to support local sport in the region. Working with Halewood will not only help the club from a sponsorship point of view but it will also allow us to supply a whole new range of exciting products to the passionate fans of the club.”The picture shows Tom Hill (Robinsons Free Trade Area Manager), Tommy Martyn (St.Helens R.F.C. Bar & Cellar Manager), Ben Robinson (Robinsons Director of Sales), Mike Rush (St.Helens R.F.C. Chief Executive), Dave Hutchinson (St.Helens R.F.C. General Manager).last_img read more

Read more…

STARTERS ORDERS Friday

first_imgWhat’s your view?CALL STAR SPORTS ON 08000 521 321 [dropcap]W[/dropcap]elcome to Starters Orders. Our daily midday update from the trading room at Star Sports with our key market movers for the day across all sports.Friday 2 OctoberRACING2.10 FontwellOceane 13/8 > 4/53.25 AscotThe Tin Man 100/30 > 5/24.15 HexhamSerenity Now 2/1 > 13/84.25 FontwellSir Mangan 7/2 > 11/44.35 AscotFlying Hammer 13/8 > 11/85.10 AscotThe Cashel Man 6/4 > 11/10ARC NEWS: Treve remains solid following news of the draw this morning.LIVE FOOTBALLChampionship7:45 Sky Sports 5 / Sky Sports 5 HD11/5 Rotherham United 13/10 Burnley 23/10 DRAW(All prices subject to fluctuation)last_img read more

Read more…

STARTERS ORDERS Monday

first_imgHORSE RACING2.30 WorcesterWadswick Court 4/1 > 2/16.05 WindsorForever Yours 9/1 > 5/16.25 RoscommonInitially 11/2 > 7/2BET WITH STAR SPORTS 08000 521 321 [dropcap]W[/dropcap]elcome to Starters Orders. Our daily midday update from the trading room at Star Sports with our key market movers for the day across all sports.Monday 10 Julylast_img

Read more…

STARTERS ORDERS Tuesday 4 June

first_imgWelcome to Starters Orders. Star Sports update with our key market movers for the day and sign up specials.Tuesday 4 JuneHORSE RACING2.00 BangorGallahers Cross 8/1 > 4/13.00 BangorOutcrop 8/1 > 9/26.10 LingfieldQuiet Place 11/10 > 4/5LIVE FOOTBALLNO MATCHESSTAR PROMOTIONSlast_img

Read more…

Columbia University Names George Rupp as New President

first_imgShare Contact: Michael Berryhill Phone: (713) 527-4943 Columbia University Names George Rupp as New President Rice University president George Rupp was named president of Columbia University, Columbia officials announcedMonday in New York. Rupp, 50, will be Columbia’s 18th president, replacing Michael I. Sovern, who announced last summer he was stepping down from thepost for personal reasons. Rupp announced in November he would leave Rice at the end of the fiscal year, June 30. His decision to leave the university was designed “to allow an immediate search for my successor,” he said atthe time. In response to Columbia’s announcement, Charles Duncan, chairman of Rice’s board of governors, issued a statement saying:”President Rupp’s administration has left an indelible stamp onthe university. The number and the quality of faculty haveincreased. The students, who are applying in increasing numbers, arebetter than ever. Rice has added two major buildings, one for musicand one for bioscience and bioengineering, and both have beennationally recognized for their excellence. These improvements andmany others were achieved during the administration of PresidentRupp.”This momentum built is not going to be lost. The board will continue to work with all members of the university community during the next several months while Rice looks for a new president. The search to find a successor for George Rupp is proceeding smoothly under the direction of [board of governors member] Kent Anderson and the search committee comprised of members of the board of governors, alumni, students, faculty and staff.” Rice Provost Neal Lane praised Rupp’s tenure in office.”George Rupp has, by any measure, been a truly outstandingpresident,” Lane said. “By providing strong intellectual leadership,enhancing the quality of the faculty, staff, students and programs,strengthening interdisciplinary education and research, improvingteaching and research facilities and emphasizing outreach, he hasmade this excellent university even better.”The faculty, staff and students greatly appreciate what President Rupp has done for Rice, and, I know, wish him well in his new challenge.” Columbia’s 238-year-old campus is located in New York City. The school has 2,300 full-time faculty members and 19,900 students. ### FacebookTwitterPrintEmailAddThislast_img read more

Read more…

Protein pulling Learning how proteins fold by pulling them apart

first_imgAddThis ShareCONTACT: Jade BoydPHONE: 713-348-6778E-MAIL: [email protected] pulling: Learning how proteins fold by pulling them apartNew method for assaying folding energy can be applied to any proteinRice University physicists have unveiled an innovative way of finding out how proteins get their shape based on how they unfold when pulled apart. The experimental method could be of widespread use in the field of protein folding science, which has grown dramatically in the past decade, due in part to the discovery that misfolded proteins play a key role in diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.Rice’s new findings, which were three years in the making, are available online and slated to appear in an upcoming issue of Physical Review Letters. The article describes a new method scientists can use to map out exactly how much free energy is required throughout the folding process.“We believe the method can be applied to any protein,” said lead author Ching-Hwa Kiang, assistant professor of physics and astronomy. “Many people are working on this problem, and when we present our work at scientific conferences it often creates a good deal of excitement.”If DNA is the blueprint for life, then proteins are the machines built from those blueprints. All living cells produce proteins by stringing together strands of amino acids based on the sequences of their DNA. Proteins are created in linear chains, like strands of pearls, with each amino acid representing a bead on the strand. However, knowing the order of the amino acids in the strand gives no clue about how a protein functions. That’s because every protein folds into a three-dimensional shape within about one second of being made, and it is this shape that dictates the protein’s function.By studying how much free energy it takes for a protein to fold into its final shape, scientists hope to learn more about how amino acid sequences affect protein function and how folding goes awry, as with some diseases.At the halfway point between it’s folded and unfolded state, a protein is like a rollercoaster balanced at the crest of the highest hill on the track. Like the rollercoaster, the protein requires a certain amount of energy to make it over the hill and wind its course to a final resting place — its folded state. If it lacks the energy to clear the hill, it will slide back into a partially folded or misfolded state.Kiang and graduate student Nolan Harris’s new approach to probing these energy states yields something akin to a map of the rollercoaster’s path. For example, theirs is the only experimental method that can reveal the slope and height of the energy barrier that the protein must overcome.“Other experimental methods give researchers a pretty clear picture of the energy states at the beginning and the end — the two equilibrium states,” Kiang said. “Our approach helps fill in what happens in between, when the system is between folded and unfolded.”Kiang and Harris’s experiments were conducted on one piece of a protein named Titin. The Titin piece, dubbed I27, contains 89 amino acids. Harris suspended thousands of intact, folded I27s in a dilute saline solution and let the solution sit long enough for the proteins to become stuck to the bottom of the sample dish. The needle from an atomic force microscope (AFM) was repeatedly dipped into the solution. The tip of the AFM operates much like a phonograph needle. The AFM needle is on the end of a cantilever arm that bobs up and down over the sample. The tip of the AFM needle is just a few atoms wide. Bobbing down, it randomly grabbed I27s that were pulled into their string-like, unfolded shape as the needle rose.Harris measured the force exerted on the cantilever arm each time an I27 was unfolded. To get the energy maps, he wrote software incorporating a statistical mechanics equation called the “Jarzynski equality.” The equation related the non-equilibrium energy from the unfolding events to the equilibrium profiles along the trajectory from the folded to the unfolded state. Kiang said the software, and the use of the Jarzynski equality, makes the new method unique and useful.“Christopher Jarzynski only discovered this relationship 10 years ago,” Kiang said. “It’s a very powerful technique.”The research was sponsored by the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, The Welch Foundation and the Hamill Foundation.last_img read more

Read more…

A dab of water aids carbon capture

first_img Adding water to asphalt-derived porous carbon improves its ability to sequester carbon dioxide at natural gas wellheads, according to Rice University researchers. The porous particles in the illustration are combined with water and then heated to remove excess water from the pores. The water that remains binds to the pore structures. Under pressures above 20 atmospheres, the filter material sequesters carbon dioxide and allows methane molecules to pass through. AddThis Return to article. Long DescriptionAdding water to asphalt-derived porous carbon improves its ability to sequester carbon dioxide at natural gas wellheads, according to Rice University researchers. The porous particles in the illustration are combined with water and then heated to remove excess water from the pores. The water that remains binds to the pore structures. Under pressures above 20 atmospheres, the filter material sequesters carbon dioxide and allows methane molecules to pass through. Illustration by Almaz JalilovNatural gas at the wellhead typically contains between 3 and 7 percent carbon dioxide, but at some locations may contain up to 70 percent. Oil and gas producers traditionally use one of two strategies to sequester carbon dioxide: physically through the use of membranes or solid sorbents like zeolites or porous carbons, or chemically through filtering with liquid amine, a derivative of ammonia.But both these methods have drawbacks. Physical filters have a hard time differentiating between carbon dioxide and methane molecules, which are nearly identical in size (3.3 to 3.8 angstroms) and polarizability (important to bonding characteristics). Chemical approaches have better selectivity but are more expensive and corrosive, and they require a large input of energy and large equipment. Despite their high selectivity, amines capture only 13 percent by weight in carbon dioxide and need superheated steam to recycle the filtration system, Tour said, while the Rice team’s system is capturing more than 200 percent by weight and no thermal source is needed.The new Rice material features the selectivity of amines, much higher uptake of carbon dioxide and no thermal requirements, he said. Coating the pore surfaces with water adds weak chemical absorption and high selectivity while retaining the material’s strong physical adsorption.“This is known as a pressure-swing adsorption system, which is easy to implement due to its small size, and there’s no need for heating since it works with the inherent pressure in the gas well,” Tour said.Water in Gilsonite forms a hydrate within pore microstructures that greatly increases the binding selectivity of carbon dioxide over methane, according to the researchers. While the grains’ micropores, at 23 angstroms, are far larger than the target molecules, the addition of water tightens the pores and decreases the pore volume through which the molecules must travel. The prepared Gilsonite has a surface area of 4,200 square meters per gram, so adding water still leaves plenty of room to capture carbon dioxide, Tour said.Over multiple testing cycles at various pressures and temperatures between freezing and 50 degrees Celsius, degradation of the material was reportedly negligible. The researchers found that about 1 percent weight of the water content was lost during cycling but determined the water content of natural gas itself would likely replace that.Almaz Jalilov, a former postdoctoral researcher at Rice and now an assistant professor at King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Saudi Arabia, is lead author of the study. Co-authors are Rice graduate student Yilun Li and research scientist Carter Kittrell. Tour is the T.T. and W.F. Chao Chair in Chemistry as well as a professor of computer science and of materials science and nanoengineering at Rice.Apache Corp. supported the research.-30-Read the abstract at https://www.nature.com/articles/s41560-017-0030-yFollow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNewsRelated materials:Asphalt-based carbon-capture material advances: http://news.rice.edu/2016/09/12/asphalt-based-carbon-capture-material-advances/Tour Group: http://www.jmtour.comWiess School of Natural Sciences: http://natsci.rice.eduImage for download: Adding water to asphalt-derived porous carbon improves its ability to sequester carbon dioxide at natural gas wellheads, according to Rice University researchers. The porous particles in the illustration are combined with water and then heated to remove excess water from the pores. The water that remains binds to the pore structures. Under pressures above 20 atmospheres, the filter material sequesters carbon dioxide and allows methane molecules to pass through. ShareNEWS RELEASEEditor’s note: A link to an image for download appears at the end of this release.David [email protected] [email protected] dab of water aids carbon captureRice University advances asphalt-based filter to sequester greenhouse gas at wellheadHOUSTON – (Dec. 11, 2017) – Rice University scientists have found a way to make their asphalt-based sorbents better at capturing carbon dioxide from gas wells: Just add water.The Rice lab of chemist James Tour discovered that treating grains of inexpensive Gilsonite asphalt with water allows the material to adsorb more than two times its weight in the greenhouse gas. The treated asphalt selects carbon dioxide over valuable methane at a ratio of more than 200-to-1.The material performs well at ambient temperatures and under the pressures typically found at wellheads. When the pressure abates, the material releases the carbon dioxide, which can then be stored, sold for other industrial uses or pumped back downhole.The research appears this month in Nature Energy. http://news.rice.edu/files/2017/10/1030_ASPHALT-1-WEB-2loex0w.jpgAdding water to asphalt-derived porous carbon improves its ability to sequester carbon dioxide at natural gas wellheads, according to Rice University researchers. The porous particles in the illustration are combined with water and then heated to remove excess water from the pores. The water that remains binds to the pore structures. Under pressures above 20 atmospheres, the filter material sequesters carbon dioxide and allows methane molecules to pass through. (Credit: Almaz Jalilov/Rice University)Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,879 undergraduates and 2,861 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for quality of life and for lots of race/class interaction and No. 2 for happiest students by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/RiceUniversityoverview. Return to article. Long Descriptionlast_img read more

Read more…

Georgetown McDonough Student Government Association Launches Research Bites Series

first_img regions: Washington, DC RelatedMcDonough Hosts Annual International FestivalMcDonough School of Business MBAs and faculty gathered in Fisher Colloquium for the school’s annual International Festival. Hosted by the MBA Student Government Association (SGA), the event showcases many of the international cultures represented at Georgetown McDonough. Sam Chen (M ’15), vice president of international students in the MBA SGA,…December 17, 2014In “Featured Home”Georgetown McDonough MBAs Head to Mexico to VolunteerWhile most MBA students enjoyed some rest and relaxation during their fall breaks, a group of six full-time and Evening MBAs from the Georgetown University McDonough School of Business traveled south of the border. The students visited the historic city of San Miguel de Allende to volunteer at Centro Infantil…November 14, 2017In “Featured Region”5 Questions with the MBA Admissions Team at UIC Liautaud Graduate School of BusinessIn our latest installment of the MetroMBA “5 Questions” series, we speak with Alanna O’Connor, Assistant Dean for Student Recruitment for the Full-Time MBA Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago Liautaud Graduate School of Business. O’Connor talks about the many new opportunities, programs, and events taking place at…April 22, 2019In “Admissions Tips” Georgetown McDonough Student Government Association Launches Research Bites Series According to McDonough, the MBA SGA serves the student body of Georgetown’s MBA program and is the primary interface between the student body and the faculty and administration. The SGA plans social events and boosts alumni relations, such as Thursday kegs, outings to local sporting events, and fall and spring formals. The SGA is also responsible for major student organization decisions, management of finances, and implementation of new and existing policies or initiatives. You can learn more about the McDonough MBA Student Government Association here. Last Updated Oct 17, 2017 by Max PulciniFacebookTwitterLinkedinemail For those wondering why speaking events don’t serve more food, you aren’t alone. At least, it seems the McDonough School of Business Student Government Association (SGA) picked up the idea, launching the Research Bites “lunch-and-learn” series late last month.The series, running until November 20, and highlights faculty research over five unique events. During each Research Bites session, a different faculty member will give a one-hour presentation about their life in academia and how their research impacts business. Gabe Nelson, MBA ’18, Vice President of curriculum for the SGA, wanted to recruit faculty members who were familiar to the student body. He reached out to professors who taught core classes and had interesting research experiences to drum up interest. Nelson says he hopes the series will “give students valuable insights that can help their careers in tangible ways” and “build faculty-student relationships.”The first Research Bite took place on September 18 and featured Associate Professor of Strategy Chris Rider. He expanded on the effectiveness of the NFL’s Rooney Rule, which is the league policy that requires all teams to interview minority candidates for head coaching positions. According to the press release, about 50 students attended the first event. Other faculty members set to participate in the series include:Debora Thompson, Associate Professor of MarketingPaul Almeida, Dean and William R. Berkley ChairJason Schloetzer, Associate Professor of AccountingAllison Koester, Assistant Professor of Accounting About the AuthorMax PulciniMax Pulcini is a Philadelphia-based writer and reporter. He has an affinity for Philly sports teams, Super Smash Bros. and cured meats and cheeses. Max has written for Philadelphia-based publications such as Spirit News, Philadelphia City Paper, and Billy Penn, as well as national news outlets like The Daily Beast.View more posts by Max Pulcini last_img read more

Read more…

We should have been using this bamboobased cutlery all along

first_imgAs someone who does his fair share of takeout, perhaps the one thing I hate with a vengeance is the flimsy, horribly designed plastic cutlery I get with my food. The spoons sometimes come with these plastic flares that get left behind from the cheap injection molding process, the knives are more flexible than the food I’m cutting, and the forks don’t possess enough structural integrity to pierce my food. All that’s aside from the fact that this cutlery eventually reaches either a landfill or the ocean by the tonne, not having served any purpose whatsoever. The sad reality is that we’re far from democratizing a solution that actually works… but with projects like the Knork Eco, we’re getting a few steps closer to conscientiously designing single-use (or even multiple-use) plastic cutlery that has little to no impact on the environment.The Knork Eco has a pretty transparent objective. To A. remove non-biodegradable single-use plastics from our life-cycle, and to B. replace them with cutlery that’s eco-friendly, biodegradable, and more importantly, much more robust and comfortable to use than those horrible disposable forks and spoons. The Knorks are made from a specialized material called Astrik, which combines sugarcane starch along with bamboo fibers. The result is a moldable polymer that’s sturdy, looks and feels like glossy plastic, is food-safe, dishwasher safe, and can biodegrade in 2 years. Most importantly, sugarcane and bamboo are two of the fastest growing plants in the world, allowing Astrik as a material to cater to the incredibly high demand of disposable cutlery without any hassle.The Knork Eco is a spoon+fork set made from Astrik. It looks and feels exactly like plastic, and can do everything plastic can. The Knork cutlery comes in its own chic case made from the bamboo-polymer too, allowing you to easily carry it around with you wherever you go, because the Knorks are much more reliable and robust than most plastic spoons and forks. They come with a larger cross-section, making them thicker and stiffer, and even integrate a broader handle with a finger-rest, allowing you to use them with the dexterity of metal cutlery.The Knorks can cleaned either manually or in a dishwasher, and can be infinitely reused until you dispose them. When introduced to the soil, the Astrik material biodegrades completely in just 2 years, turning into compost that can then be used to grow more plants, making it perhaps the best example of nature-conscious cradle-to-grave designing with zero negative impact. Yes I said it, we should have been using this bamboo-based cutlery all along!Designer: KNORK FlatwareClick Here to Buy Now: $15 $30 (50% off).The KNORK Eco is a plant-based bamboo utensils that are dishwasher safe, compost in 2 years, and sustainably made. Genius design meets epic functionality.KNORK Eco uses Astrik: Made from PLA (poly lactic acid – sugar cane starch 90%) and bamboo fiber (10%), this eco-friendly and responsibly sourced material provides a workable, multi-functional + sustainable alternative to harmful one-use plastic utensils.The designers have thinned and improved the tines, and added a platform right where your index finger typically rests when doing the aforementioned side-tipping action. These help the user to rock through and cut most foods without reaching for a knife, and the contoured handle fits comfortably in most hands and creates an ergonomic balance.Eco pieces will fit many specific niche market opportunities where the functionality encourages creative freedom for chefs in environments where use of a knife isn’t feasible.The combination of clever design and a dishwasher-safe, durable, and 2 year compost-able material was exactly what we had been looking for, and the Eco line was born.If you love food and eating as much as we do, you’ll totally get that the one constant of American style eating is the natural born habit of people to tip forks on their sides to cut through foods that it’s not necessarily normal to reach for a knife to eat. Think waffles, pancakes, chicken, burritos, coney dogs, etc.KNORK is perfect for multi-tasking, on the go eating-think desk lunches or cocktail parties where the ultimate challenge is to hold your drink in one hand while trying to eat with the other.The stainless steel fork and spoon that fit into the new carrying case will feature a limited edition “Eco” stamp, so you know just which pieces to reach for when packing your lunch!Click Here to Buy Now: $15 $30 (50% off). Hurry, less than 72 hours left!SharePinShareFlipSharePocket825 Shareslast_img read more

Read more…

Oregon House to Congress Exempt Oregon from Online Sales Tax

first_imgOregon House to Congress: Exempt Oregon from Online Sales Tax on June 13, 2013 By CBN 0 LinkedIn The Oregon House of Representatives sent a message to the U.S. Congress today: Don’t impose an online sales tax on Oregon’s businesses. The measure, House Joint Memorial 18, comes in reaction to passage by the U.S. Senate of the “Marketplace Fairness Act” which would require Oregon retailers with more than $1 million in out-of-state sales to collect and remit that state’s sales taxes.“This federal mandate would put a heavy burden on Oregon’s small businesses and eliminate their competitive advantage,” said Rep. Vicki Berger (R – Salem). “At a time when Oregon’s economy is still recovering, the federal government needs to stop throwing cold water on our local retailers.”The impact of the federal online sales tax would be significant on Oregon’s businesses. First, because Oregon does not have its own sales tax retailers located in the state, in particular small businesses, lack the infrastructure to collect and remit sales taxes. Second, a federal requirement to collect sales taxes from purchases outside Oregon would take away an economic advantage Oregon’s businesses currently enjoy.The measure passed the House on unanimous  bipartisan vote. E-Headlines Pinterestcenter_img Facebook Email Tumblr Google+ Share. Twitterlast_img read more

Read more…

Bend Day Spa Opens in Bend Oregons Old Mill District

first_img Facebook 0 The heart of Central Oregon will welcome a brand-new day spa next month, Bend Day Spa. The new spa will offer an oasis in the Old Mill District that owners Brad and Heather Welker have fashioned to encompass all the things they love about Bend. Starting with an easy-going, comfortable atmosphere, the spa will offer everything from massages and body treatments to manicures and pedicures.Heather said, “We thought of the idea for Bend Day Spa after spending a day shopping and dining in the Old Mill District. Our tired feet and backs made us both say ‘this place needs a day spa!’ So we decided to create one – a place where locals can stop in for a massage or pedicure after a long day of playing hard, and a place where those visiting Bend can get pampered with a facial, body treatment and manicure after spending a day exploring all Central Oregon has to see.”Bend Day Spa will feature local products, including Angelina Organic Skincare which offers a full artisan-crafted line of natural, organic, effective skin care and anti-aging products. In addition, guests to the spa will enjoy complimentary beverages from local beer, wine and kombucha companies. The spa will offer special “locals only” packages, as well as seasonal specials.Born and raised in Bend, Brad Welker is a chiropractor who founded Bend Spinal Care 15 years ago. Heather has worked as an occupational therapist for the last 17 years and has a true passion for helping people feel their best. The couple is looking forward to creating a relaxing place that has the true feel of the Bend lifestyle.Bend Day Spa will open mid-March and will be located in upper level at the Old Mill District above Victoria’s Secret (suite 627). Call 541-647-1329 for more information, or visit their website (coming soon!) www.benddayspa.com Tumblr Pinterest By CBN Bend Day Spa Opens in Bend, Oregon’s Old Mill District on March 3, 2015center_img Share. Email Google+ E-Headlines Twitter LinkedInlast_img read more

Read more…

Flip Then Say Articulation Books

first_imgImage Source: EnableMart.comTreating articulation errors has never been easier or more fun, than with the Flip Then Say Articulation Flip Books. This assistive technology device is useful for kids who could benefit form extra practice with word pronunciation. Common articulation error sounds (S, Z, SH, CH, J, ZH, K, G, TH, F and V) are all found in four colorful change-a-story flipbooks. Students will love practicing their sounds as they make endless sentence story combinations over 200,000 in all!. These are convenient, easy of use, and versatile for receptive and expressive language practice. Convenient carry-bag included. This assistive technology is for kids ages 4+.It includes:The Entire World of S & Z Change-a-Story Flip Book (41 pages)The Entire World of SH & CH Change-a-Story Flip Book (43 pages)The Entire World of K & G Change-a-Story Flip Book (28 pages)The Entire World of TH, F & V Change-a-Story Flip Book (36 pages)Carry-BagShare this…TwitterFacebookPinterestLinkedInEmailPrint RelatedBoo Articulation HelperDecember 26, 2017In “Apps”Apps and Activities for Speech and Language DevelopmentJune 15, 2016In “Apps”Sparkup Magical Book ReaderAugust 31, 2016In “Products and Devices”last_img read more

Read more…

The Mercury Handheld Magnifier StandScan

first_imgMercury’s Specs:Dimensions: 5.16 x 2.64 x 0.39 inchesWeight: 4.97 oz (141 g)Display: 5.5 inchesResolution: 720 x 1280 pixelsTouchscreen: Multi-touchCamera: 13 megapixelsProcessor: Quad Core, 1200 MHzBuilt-in Storage: 8 GBBattery Life: 10 hours, continuous useWarranty: 1 yearCharger: Mini USBClick here for pricing information and to learn more! StandScanTo make using the Mercury Handheld even more convenient, it’s recommended to also purchase the StandScan.  The StandScan is a portable document scanner you can use with your Mercury Magnifier, as well as any smartphone!The StandScan provides an “elevated platform support for high-quality scanning of documents and photos using your smartphone.  It is a cost-effective, portable and lightweight phone accessory that also helps you scan live 3D objects.”  The ScanStand is simple to use, sets up in seconds, and folds flat to fit in a computer bag.StandScan Features:Compatible with any smartphoneSuper lightweight and durableInstant sharing with friends and familyScan high-quality copies of receipts/documents in under 10 secondsNo drivers, cables, or software requiredSaves time and spaceAssistance for visually impairedClick here to learn more on the Mercury Magnifier and StandScan!Share this…TwitterFacebookPinterestLinkedInEmailPrint RelatedMerlin Elite Pro CCTV and OCRJune 18, 2019In “Visual”DaVinci Pro Desktop Video MagnifierDecember 1, 2015In “Products and Devices”Prodigi: Personal Vision AssistantFebruary 6, 2014In “Tech Tips” If you or a loved one are in the market for a portable magnifier and OCR, perhaps you should consider the Mercury Handheld Magnifier and OCR.  The Mercury Handheld Magnifier and OCR is a touch-based live magnification device that can perform accurate full page OCR.  The magnifier features a wide 5.5 inch display screen with a built-in LED light and more!Mercury Handheld Magnifier Features:Magnification up to 10X in live mode and 30X in OCR modeTalk back menuFalse color optionsIntuitive touch navigationAbility to save and load photos and documentsAccurate full-page OCRVarious reading optionsFree Grip Case and chargerlast_img read more

Read more…

ATFAQ066 – Q1 Voiceover compatible video editing Q2 Differences between External HDDs

first_img ATFAQ logoShare this…TwitterFacebookPinterestLinkedInEmailPrint Return to article. Long DescriptionPanel – Brian Norton, Belva Smith, Josh Anderson, Wade Wingler | Q1 Voiceover compatible video editing Q2 Differences between External HDDs Q3 Jaws with Mac Touch Bar Q4 Low cost no cost transcription Q5 Is special software required for transcription Q6 creating screenreader friendly math worksheets. Q7 Sources for AT news and trainingShare this…TwitterFacebookPinterestLinkedInEmailPrint RelatedATFAQ103 – Q1- inside navigation for visually impaired , Q2 – amplified phones, Q3 – zero-force keyboards, Q4 – converting math worksheets for screenreader access, Q5 – assistance getting into house, Q6 – Switching from Jaws to NVDA, Q7 – Wildcard question: balancing medical and developmental concerns when using assistive techJuly 8, 2019In “Assistive Technology FAQ (ATFAQ) Podcast”ATFAQ095 – Q1- Fall Detection and Alerts for bathroom , Q2 – Discrete notification system for classroom , Q3 – Interactive Math and Graphing software, Q4 – Aegir Smartpen, Q5 – Text-to-speech for state assessment tests , Q6 – App Showdown – TalkBack and VoiceOver , Q7 *Wildcard question: Are passwords a thing of the past?March 11, 2019In “Assistive Technology FAQ (ATFAQ) Podcast”ATFAQ074 – Q1 Mac accessibility keystrokes Q2 USBc adapters Q3 Picture-based timers Q4 Listen to Pocket articles on Amazon Echo Q5 Talking multi-meter Q6 High tech vs mid tech vs low tech Q7 Do we even need a mouse anymoreApril 23, 2018In “Assistive Technology FAQ (ATFAQ) Podcast” Podcast: Play in new window | Downloadlast_img read more

Read more…

AM276 – SmartVision2 Premium Android Smartphone

first_imgPodcast: Play in new window | Download276-3-2-18 SmartVision2 Premium Android Smartphone Hey there! Welcome to Accessibility Minute, your weekly look at Assistive Technology, those clever tools and devices designed to help people who have difficulties with vision, mobility, hearing or other special needs!If you’re looking for a smartphone designed for individuals who are visually impaired, check out the SmartVision2 Premium.  According to their website, the SmartVision2 Premium is the “only Android 6.0 smartphone with a full panel of applications dedicated to those with visual impairments.”The device was carefully crafted from the ground up to maximize the ease-of-use for individuals who are blind or visually impaired.  With this phone, you can use popular applications like:PhoneTextsEmailCalculatorGoogle Play StoreGoogle ChromeOther features of the Premium phone include:Large viewing screen with high-contrast displayMenus and selected text are spoken back to youVoice-assisted GPS navigationE-book creator and readerAnd much moreVisit irie-at.com to learn more.For more information, to read our blog, or to drop us a line, visit EasterSealsTech.com.  That was your Accessibility Minute for this week! I’m Laura Medcalf with the INDATA Project at Easterseals Crossroads, in Indiana.Share this…TwitterFacebookPinterestLinkedInEmailPrint RelatedSmartVision2 Premium Android SmartphoneFebruary 22, 2018In “Visual”KAPSYS SmartVision2: The First Smartphone for the Visually ImpairedApril 24, 2018In “Apps”Synapptic Smartphone – Smartphone for Individuals with Visual ImpairmentsApril 11, 2019Similar postlast_img read more

Read more…

Free access for children to GP services increases utilization of care

first_imgMay 14 2018In July 2015, all children under six years of age gained free access to daytime and out-of-hours general practice services in the Republic of Ireland, resulting in a 25 percent increase in utilization.Comparing the year prior to the introduction of free GP care with the following year, daytime general practitioner visits by children under six years increased from 9,789 to 12,600, while out-of-hours visits increased from 15,087 to 18,958. In the post-period, nine percent more children were seen at least once in daytime services and 20 percent more children were seen at least once out-of-hours. While visits by patients of all ages increased in the post-period, children under age six were responsible for a disproportionate increase in service utilization, accounting for 45 percent of additional daytime visits and 73 percent of additional out-of-hours visits. Given the inevitable increase in service utilization that accompanies the availability of free care, and with indications that Ireland’s GP workforce may soon struggle to meet demand, the authors call for careful workforce planning if state-funded general practice care is extended to other groups. Source:http://www.annfammed.org/last_img read more

Read more…

Scientists elucidate how Ecoli bacteria attach to host intestinal epithelium

first_imgJul 11 2018Osaka University scientists clarify how E.coli bacteria attach to human intestinesOsaka University-led researchers clarified how pathogenic E. coli bacteria attached to the host intestinal epithelium. They revealed that type IV pili on the surface of the bacteria were not sufficient for adherence to intestinal epithelial cells and that proteins secreted by E.coli were also necessary. It was found that this attachment mechanism might be a common feature in many enteropathogens such as Vibrio cholera and constitutes a novel therapeutic target against such bacterial pathogens.Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is known as a major cause of diarrhea in travelers and people living in developing countries. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), ETEC is responsible for 300,000 ~ 500,000 deaths a year, constituting a serious problem.Effective vaccines for ETEC have not been developed, so patients infected with ETEC are treated with antibiotics and supporting measures. However, the emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria has become a social issue, so the development of new treatment methods is sought after.Adherence to the host intestinal epithelium is an essential step for ETEC infection in humans. It was thought that a filamentous structure on the surface of bacteria called ‘type IV pilus’ was important for bacterial attachment, but its detailed adhesion mechanism was not known.Osaka University-led researchers clarified how pathogenic E.coli attached to the host intestinal epithelium using type IV pili and secreted proteins. Their research results were published in PNAS.Related StoriesStructure of bacteria responsible for traveler’s diarrhea decipheredMother calls for protein shake regulation after daughter diesNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerOne of the corresponding authors, Shota Nakamura, says, “We demonstrated that type IV pili on the surface of the bacteria were not sufficient for ETEC adherence to intestinal epithelial cells and that proteins secreted by E.coli were also necessary. The administration of antibodies against the secreted proteins inhibited attachment of the E.coli.”Using X-ray crystallography, the researchers studied how a protein located only at the pilus-tip interacts with a protein secreted by E.coli in the intestines (Figure 2), clarifying the attachment mechanism of ETEC; that is, secreted proteins serve as molecular bridges that bind both type IV pili on the surface of the bacteria and intestinal epithelial cells in humans.Nakamura also says, “It’s possible that this attachment is a common feature in many type IV pili expressing enteropathogens such as Vibrio cholerae and constitutes a new therapeutic target against such bacterial pathogens.”Their research results will lead to the development of not only new vaccines for ETEC, but also anti-adhesion agents for preventing the binding of proteins implicated in bacterial attachment. Anti-adhesion agents can rinse pathogenic bacteria out from the body without destroying them, so there is no danger of producing drug-resistant bacteria. These agents, once developed, will act as a novel treatment approach that may serve as an alternative to antibiotics. Source:http://resou.osaka-u.ac.jp/en/research/2018/20180629_3last_img read more

Read more…

Italys Mount Etna could be collapsing into the sea

first_imgFelix Gross By Sid PerkinsOct. 10, 2018 , 2:00 PM Italy’s Mount Etna could be collapsing into the seacenter_img For decades, scientists have known that the southeastern slopes of Mount Etna, an active volcano on the eastern shore of Sicily in Italy, are shifting toward the sea about 2 or 3 centimeters each year. Now, they have a better idea of why this is happening, and it’s making them worried.In a new study, scientists gathered data from seafloor instruments that allowed them to track the movement of the volcano’s submarine slopes over time. For most of the 15-month period they studied, nothing happened. But during an 8-day period in May 2017, Mount Etna’s southeastern flank moved 4 centimeters to the east, the researchers report online today in Science Advances.That’s a much larger movement than has been recorded on land, suggesting the southeastern flank of the volcano is collapsing under its own weight. There’s no telling whether, or when, this slow-motion landslide will really let loose, but the researchers note that sudden slumps of undersea material have created locally devastating tsunamis in other parts of the world.last_img read more

Read more…

Plants and animals sometimes take genes from bacteria study of algae suggests

first_img Plants and animals sometimes take genes from bacteria, study of algae suggests Debashish Bhattacharya Email By Elizabeth PennisiJan. 29, 2019 , 4:45 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe In 2015, after analyses of millions of protein sequences across many species, William Martin, a biologist at the University of Dusseldorf (UD) in Germany, and colleagues concluded in Nature that there is no significant ongoing transfer of prokaryotic genes into eukaryotes. Martin believes any such transfers only occurred episodically early in the evolution of eukaryotes, as they internalized the bacteria that eventually became organelles such mitochondria or chloroplasts. If bacterial genes were continually moving into eukaryotes and being put to use, Martin says, a pattern of such gene accumulation should be discernible within the eukaryotic family tree, but there is none.Debashish Bhattacharya, an evolutionary genomicist at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey, and UD plant biochemist Andreas Weber took a closer look at a possible case of bacteria-to-eukaryote gene transfer that Martin has challenged. The initial sequencing of genomes from two species of red algae called Cyanidiophyceae had indicated that up to 6% of their DNA had a prokaryotic origin. These so-called extremophiles, which live in acidic hot springs and even inside rock, can’t afford to maintain superfluous DNA. They appear to contain only genes needed for survival. “When we find a bacterial gene, we know it has an important function or it wouldn’t last” in the genome, Bhattacharya says.He and Weber turned to a newer technology that deciphers long pieces of DNA. The 13 red algal genomes they studied contain 96 foreign genes, nearly all of them sandwiched between typical algal genes in the DNA sequenced, which makes it unlikely they were accidentally introduced in the lab. “At the very least, this argument that [putative transferred genes are] all contamination should finally be obsolete,” says Gerald Schoenknecht, a plant physiologist at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater.The transferred genes seem to transport or detoxify heavy metals, or they help the algae extract nourishment from the environment or cope with high temperature and other stressful conditions. “By acquiring genes from extremophile prokaryotes, these red algae have adapted to more and more extreme environments,” Schoenknecht says. Martin says the new evidence doesn’t persuade him. “They go to great lengths to find exactly what I say they should find if [horizontal gene transfer to eukaryotes] is real, but they do not find it,” he asserts. Others argue that gene transfer to eukaryotes is so rare, and the pressure to get rid of any but the most important borrowed genes is so strong, that transferred genes might not accumulate over time as Martin expects.Of course, Roger says, “What’s happening in red algae might not be happening in animals like us.” Humans and all other multicellular eukaryotes, including plants, have specialized reproductive cells, such as sperm or eggs or their stem cells, and only bacterial genes picked up by those cells could be passed on.Despite this obstacle, several insect researchers say they see evidence of such gene transfer. John McCutcheon, a biologist at Montana State University in Missoula who studies mealy bugs, is one. “I’ve moved beyond asking ‘if [the bacterial genes] are there,’ to how they work,” he says. The red algae, he adds, “is a very clear case.”center_img Algae found in thermal springs and other extreme environments have heated up a long-standing debate: Do eukaryotes—organisms with a cell nucleus—sometimes get an evolutionary boost in the form of genes transferred from bacteria? The genomes of some red algae, single-celled eukaryotes, suggest the answer is yes. About 1% of their genes have foreign origins, and the borrowed genes may help the algae adapt to their hostile environment.The new research, posted last week as a preprint on bioRxiv, has not persuaded the most vocal critic of the idea that eukaryotes regularly receive beneficial bacterial DNA. But other scientists have been won over. The group provides a “fairly nice, rock-solid case for horizontal gene transfer” into eukaryotes, says Andrew Roger, a protist genomicist at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada.Many genome studies have shown that prokaryotes—bacteria and archaea—liberally swap genes among species, which influences their evolution. The initial sequencing of the human genome suggested our species, too, has picked up microbial genes. But further work demonstrated that such genes found in vertebrate genomes were often contaminants introduced during sequencing. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country To thrive in extreme environments like thermal springs, unicellular red algae (green) have taken in bacteria genes. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

Read more…

University research center will search for extraterrestrial intelligence

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) is getting a home base. On 1 March, Pennsylvania State University in State College will announce the first contributions to a campaign that hopes to raise $110 million for the new Penn State Extraterrestrial Intelligence (PSETI) Center with endowed professorships and a degree-granting graduate program. It would be one of just a few academic SETI research centers and, if plans are realized, it could be the first to offer courses from the undergraduate to Ph.D. level. Some astronomers say it would provide a badly needed boost to a subdiscipline that has long suffered from neglect.“There really isn’t an academic ecosystem for the field as a whole,” says Penn State astronomer Jason Wright, who will serve as the PSETI Center head. “You can’t work on it if you can’t hire students and postdocs.”Financial backing for SETI research has been scarce ever since 1993, when the U.S. Congress banned NASA from funding it. “We became the four-letter word at NASA,” recalls astronomer Jill Tarter, a co-founder of the SETI Institute in Mountain View, California, one of the few other centers to support SETI research with nongovernmental funds. The cutoff in federal funding has had a long-term, chilling effect, Wright says. He has identified just five people with Ph.D.s in research related to SETI. “It takes a special kind of person to go into a field that’s unfunded and holds few job prospects,” says Wright, who has, until now, had to pursue SETI as a hobby and sideline to his main job as an exoplanet investigator.The new Penn State center would hire faculty and postdocs and introduce undergraduate and graduate courses. It could eventually offer grants to researchers outside the university.So far, Penn State has received two private gift pledges totaling $3.5 million, which will create a new professorship within the astronomy department and subsidize other SETI research. Although that leaves a considerable sum to be raised, Wright considers it a good start, showing that “this idea is something that resonates.” He believes, moreover, that Penn State is an ideal base for SETI research because it has the pieces needed for such a far-reaching, interdisciplinary enterprise: a strong astronomy department, a NASA-funded Astrobiology Research Center, and the Center for Astrostatistics. The university also serves as the hub for the worldwide Astrophysical Multimessenger Observatory Network.Andrew Siemion, director of the SETI Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley, applauds the Penn State effort. “Having SETI in the school’s curriculum gives a stamp of approval to the field that is very important,” says Siemion, one of the five aforementioned Ph.D.s who never thought he could carve out a career in SETI.Tarter is similarly enthused. She sees the plans unveiled by Penn State as part of a “resurgence” of the field. She is excited by the steady stream of newly discovered worlds and is anxious to find out whether potentially habitable planets are, in fact, inhabited by intelligent life. “I don’t think you can ask the question of life beyond Earth and stop at microbes,” Tarter says. Email University research center will search for extraterrestrial intelligence The massive Arecibo dish in Puerto Rico was used in a NASA search for alien radio signals before Congress canceled it in 1993.center_img By Steve NadisFeb. 28, 2019 , 8:00 AM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe David Parker/Science Source Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

Read more…

Viking Comb Discovered Provides Insights into their Alphabet

first_imgA 1,200-year-old comb, discovered in 2018 in Denmark, is shedding light on the birth and development of the Viking alphabet. When a team of archaeologists first discovered the fragments of a comb, they didn’t think it was necessarily a breakthrough.Combs are among the most common archaeological remains of the Viking Age.The archaeologists scooped it up in a pile of soil and sent it to the conservation lab, following procedure.Photo by The Museum of Southern Western JutlandAfter they got a call, they gave the comb another look. It had several lines etched into it, spelling out a word in runes, the ancient Viking alphabet.The word “comb”  was inscribed on one side while what is a version of “to comb” is on the other.It was the late 8th century, a critical time for the Vikings. Their age began just before 800 AD and language in the region had undergone hundreds of years of evolution.The world’s oldest runic inscription (160 AD) on the Vimose comb, Denmark.Photo by Nationalmuseet CC BY SA 3.0The comb provided evidence of the birth of the new runic alphabet that emerged around 800 AD. Previously, the Vikings used a more complicated alphabet known as the 24-character futhark.The alphabet was reformed in the 8th century to include just 16 runes. The simplified script spread rapidly across the Viking world, and continued to be used for centuries.Photo by The Museum of Southern Western JutlandThe comb was discovered during excavations of Ribe — an 8th century settlement that claims to be Denmark’s oldest town. It was found alongside a small plate made from bone or antler, with another short runic inscription.“We are seeing the birth of something major in Scandinavian history,” archaeologist and excavation leader Søren Sindbæk, from Aarhus University, Denmark, said in an interview with CNN. “It’s a very rare discovery… We were a bit embarrassed that we hadn’t even thought about cleaning it a little.”Photo by The Museum of Southern Western JutlandWhat matters most for Sindbæk is that these artifacts show a variety in the usage of runes, according to MSN. There are only four examples of early runic inscriptions from Ribe — including the two recent discoveries — and all suggest a different purpose.“While the comb shows some scribbling,” says Sindbæk in an interview, “the other inscription has very formal runes, that were clearly part of the decoration of the object.”Photo by The Museum of Southern Western JutlandSindbæk believes the labelled comb could have been used for teaching, sharing, or experimenting with the skill of writing. Gareth Williams, a Viking specialist from the British Museum, agrees that this is possible, according to CNN.“A lot of runic inscriptions on objects look like practice pieces,” he says. “It may just be that someone was practising and chose to use words inspired by the object itself. “The finds demonstrate the spread of literacy.“As more finds like this are discovered,” continues Williams, “it becomes more likely that a significant proportion of the population in the Viking Age could read and write.”Read another story from us: The Function of this 3,500-yr-old Bronze Hand is Mystifying Archaeologists“In terms of popular perceptions of the Vikings today, that is quite surprising,” he adds, “but perhaps no more than the fact that Viking combs are extremely common, indicating that the Vikings liked to keep their hair neat and tidy.”last_img read more

Read more…

Conspiracy to derail NRC process AASU on govt plea seeking sample reverification

first_img NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home, don’t want to be rescued ExplainedWhat does re-verification entail?In the first draft of the NRC, 1.90 crore of the 3.29 crore applicants were included. In the final draft, 1.5 lakh included in first draft were excluded and a total of 2.89 crore applicants were included. The NRC authorities last month further dropped 1,02,462 names from the final draft. The names were removed because the updation process consists of continuous quality checks and verifications. Sample re-verification, if approved by the Supreme Court and carried out, would mean that in all probability more names from the final draft would be dropped.AASU’s general secretary Lurinjyoti Gogoi said, “The demand at this point of time appears to be a conspiracy to derail and delay the NRC updation process. The governments have demanded it when only a few weeks are left for the final NRC. They could have demanded it much earlier. Why demand it just when the final NRC is about to come out?” Advertising The final NRC is expected to be published on July 31. The AASU is one of the stakeholders in the case in the SC on the updation of the NRC.An official of the Home and Political Department of the Assam government told The Indian Express, “We submitted it (application) on July 9. Both Centre and State moved it.” The application has sought a sample re-verification of 20 per cent of the names in districts close to Bangladesh or where the average population growth rate is higher than the normal and 10 per cent in the remaining districts, the official said. He said it was not a new appeal by the state since they had sought the same after the draft NRC was released last year. The government has maintained that a re-verification was needed since the draft came out. nrc, assam nrc, assam nrc updation, assam nrc supreme court, aasu nrc, All Assam Students Union, nrc bjp application, india news. indian express People check their names in the NRC list during a hearing at a Seva Kendra in Guwahati on Tuesday. (PTI)The All Assam Students Union (AASU) on Saturday criticised the Centre’s and state government’s application to the Supreme Court demanding a sample re-verification of 10-20 per cent of the names which appeared in the draft National Register of Citizens (NRC) published last year. Centre, Assam move SC, seek NRC deadline extension, sample reverification Related News center_img Supreme Court notice to Centre, Assam on pleas against NRC appeal order Written by Abhishek Saha | Guwahati | Updated: July 14, 2019 8:19:00 am Advertising The All Assam Minority Students’ Union (AAMSU), another stakeholder in the case, said that they are planning to file a counter-affidavit in the SC. “It appears to be an attempt to delay the NRC. Who will carry out the re-verification? It will be the same government officials who have been involved in the NRC process all this while,” AAMSU advisor Azizur Rahman said.However, the government official said that according to their appeal the re-verification was to be done by another official and not the one who had checked documents.After the final draft was published, the SC had last year said in an order on August 28, “At this stage, we may also indicate that pursuant to our previous order dated 16th August, 2018, (NRC State Coordinator in Assam Prateek) Hajela has placed before us a district-wise data of the percentage of the population who have been excluded from the final draft NRC. Having perused the same we are of the view that the Court should consider the necessity of carrying out the sample re-verification of at least 10 per cent of the names included in the final draft NRC, if required, by a team of NSK Personnel from a neighbouring district… Hajela is also requested to submit a report in this regard and the possible timeframe when such an exercise can begin if ordered by the Court and the timeframe within which the same can be completed.” Post Comment(s)last_img read more

Read more…