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South Africa resumes seafood exports to Russia

first_img12 November 2014South African will begin seafood exports to Russia after the Eurasian country granted twelve seafood companies licences to supply canned and frozen fish.This is the first since the late 1990s that South African fish will be exported to Russia on a commercial basis, said Felix Ratheb, chief executive of Cape Town-based Sea Harvest, one of the South African companies granted a licence.The other 11 companies granted rights to supply seafood are Abagold Ltd, Compass Challenger, GSA Trades Pty Ltd, Harvest Atlantic Peace, Irvin & Johnson Limited, Kaytrad Coldstore, LAVERNE, Marine Products, Pioneer Fishing Pty Ltd, Sea Vuna Fishing Company Pty Ltd and Viking Fishing Co Pty Ltd.Speaking to Reuters, Ratheb said Sea Harvest’s first exports to Russia were expected in early 2015 and would begin at about 500 tonnes a year, worth between R25-million to R40-million. South Africa’s total fish exports in 2012 were valued at R3.5-billion but this figure could increase if Russia becomes a major importer, according to Ratheb.According to the Russian Embassy website the legal platform for the Russian-South African relations in trade and economy was launched in 1993 with the Agreement on Trade and Economic Cooperation.Other key treaties include the Agreement on Cooperation in Mining (1999), Agreement on Double Taxation Avoidance (2000) and Investment Promotion and Protection Agreement (2000).South Africa is a leading Russian foreign trade partner in sub-Saharan Africa, according to the Russian Embassy. Bilateral trade in the January to November 2013 period increased by 22.1% to US$998-million, compared to US$817-million from January to November 2012.Russia’s exports increased by 59.1% to US$260.5-million, from US$163.7-million in January to November 2012, and imports grew by 12.9% to US$737.5-million. Mutual investments between the two countries are also massive. Russian investments in South Africa reached over US$1-billion in the last year.Major Russian exports to South Africa comprise chemical and agro-industrial products, precious and base metals, coking coal, fertilisers, machinery, equipment, vehicles, tools, textiles, footwear and mineral products. On the other hand, South African exports to Russia are dominated by fruits, mineral products, machinery, equipment, vehicles, chemical products, precious and base metals, raw hides, textiles and footwear.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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Siding and Interior Finish Work in New Hampshire

first_imgQuarter-sawn spruce clapboardsStarting in late July, we turned our attention to the exterior and specifically the siding. While we considered trying to tackle this ourselves, we hired Eric again. Besides his skill and experience, he also had staging and a siding nail gun. Eric took the lead on the entire siding project. I helped on and off the staging and Kyra (plus her dad) did tons of staining.We had already ordered the siding in 2013 and stored it over the winter. The siding was quarter-sawn spruce clapboards from Ward Clapboard Mill in Vermont. Although quarter-sawn clapboards are more expensive than plain-sawn, they are more stable and less prone to cupping. We were willing to pay for this high quality, and balanced it by choosing Ward’s cottage grade, which includes blemishes and knots. This area on the west side of the house shows a large awning window with stained spruce clapboards, stained pine corner boards, and pine window trim finished with Vermont Natural Coatings exterior wood finish.Kyra was concerned that the cottage grade might look junky, but we liked how it turned out on another house project we had been following online (“Building a super-insulated Vermont home”). We also saved enough by choosing cottage grade that we paid to have the clapboards pre-primed — a good call that meant huge time savings for us. We installed the clapboards rough side out, and it looks awesome.The other big decision was what to do about a rainscreen.The siding project went from early August until mid-September 2014. Kyra and I also built overhangs over the two large fixed south-facing windows.We knew this was an important feature to build into the exterior, but weren’t sure about what materials to use. We ruled out 1×4 furring strips because we thought they would push out the siding too much and complicate the window trim. Ripping plywood sheets into strips was an option, but we settled on products from Cor-A-Vent, partially because we had seen them used successfully at the Up Hill House. We used Sturdi-Strips and SV-3 Siding Vent to create a â…œ-inch rainscreen gap, vented at both the top and bottom of the wall. Editor’s note: This is Part 4 of a multi-part blog series on the construction of Brian and Kyra’s home in New Hampshire. Here is a link to Part 5: Finishing Touches for a Pretty Good House in New Hampshire. Keeping the waterline from freezingOur well contractor was scheduled to come back in September to install the submerged well pump and well tank, and to hook it all up. Before this could happen, I had to do some stressful research and decision-making about what kind of heat cable to get.Because the water line was already hooked into the well casing and backfilled, we would have to push the heat cable into the water line from the house. The water line ran about 175 feet from the house to the well with some sweeping turns around the house and back towards the well. We made the call to get a 120-foot in-pipe heat cable that would protect the most vulnerable part of the water line starting at the house. (The 50 feet + near the well was buried deeper.)Our well contractor suggested a certain heat cable product, but I wasn’t able to find enough information about the product to make me feel comfortable with the purchase. After some internet research, I came across a company based in Canada called Heat-Line. We went with the 120-volt version of their Retro-Line, 120 feet long. It cost almost $2,000, but we didn’t have other good options. Pushing the 120-foot heat cable into the water line was straightforward. After all the stress, the work was completed in mid-September. ARTICLES BY BRIAN POST Building a Small House in the White MountainsPouring the Slab and Framing the WallsWindows, Housewrap, and Roofing Underlayment Finishing Touches for a Pretty Good House in New Hampshire Kyra and her dad working on the trim for one of the big south facing windows. These are fixed windows.After this was done, I sealed up the rough window openings with canned spray foam and we started working on window trim. Kyra’s dad came for the first of many visits at this time, helping on various projects with his woodworking skills.We liked the look of simple pine trim and went with 12-inch pine boards for the jambs and 4-inch pine boards for the casing. The window trim work required a lot of shimming and other fitting work, but it came out well. Kyra working on the east door overhang.To protect the exterior doors and entrance areas, we also hired a friend, Ray, to help us build protective roofs. We used Douglas fir posts, 2x6s, tongue-and-groove pine boards, and pine trim. We also used some leftover synthetic roofing underlayment and small metal roofing panels. Exhaust-only ventilationBased on the recommendation of our foundation/shell contractor, we went with an exhaust ventilation setup consisting of Panasonic WhisperGreen bath fans with Panasonic passive air inlets. We eventually settled on a WhisperGreen model that could run on continuous levels as low as 30 cfm and then be boosted (for set time periods or until turned “off”) up to 80 cfm.One fan was installed in the full bath upstairs and one in the half bath downstairs. Before insulation and drywall, we installed 4-inch rigid duct through the walls in the fan locations and the needed plastic duct for two passive air inlets (one downstairs and one in the main bedroom). The Panasonic passive air inlets are rated for 12 to 18 cfm, so we figured it would be OK to start with two, giving us up to 36 cfm of makeup air.Later, when we first powered on the fans with our electrician, we figured out that the two passive air inlets were not providing enough makeup air. The house was getting depressurized even with one fan running at only 30 cfm. This was happening because the house is so tight and the passive air inlets don’t allow as much air as advertised. (One online review said they tested at 10 cfm). For various reasons, adjusting our ventilation setup would be an ongoing theme as time went on; more on this later. Cabinets and interior stairsWe made good (but slow) interior progress over the winter and into spring 2014. The snow bank on the north side of the house finally melted in early May 2014; we continued with interior work and turned some attention to outside.Cabinet material stacked in the kitchen and ready to assemble.We had ordered ready-to-assemble cabinets from Barker Cabinets and kept everything stacked in the kitchen. We decided on Barker rather than a local cabinet company because the cabinets were higher quality for the price and the online ordering process was also straightforward. Brian Post is a photographer and website builder. He lives in Jackson, New Hampshire with his wife, Kyra Salancy, and a fluffy black dog. When not working on their house, Brian and Kyra enjoy climbing and skiing in the White Mountains. Space heat is all electricWe scheduled the installation of the ductless minisplit for early June 2014. One of these on the first floor would be our main heat source for the entire house. As backup on extremely cold nights (or if the minisplit malfunctioned) we planned to install small Stiebel Eltron wall-mounted electric heaters in each bathroom and bedroom, as well as a couple more in the open downstairs area.We went back and forth about which size minisplit to get, but eventually decided on a Mitsubishi FH12NA. While our Energy Star HERS rater suggested we might be better going up one size, we thought the FH12NA would meet our needs. Fortunately, the installation was completed in time to take advantage of a $500 rebate from the state of New Hampshire. Soffits and small protective roofsWe rehired Eric, one of the workers who helped the foundation/shell contractor, to take the lead on finishing the soffit. We used 1×8 tongue-and-groove pine, treated with an exterior wood finish from Vermont Natural Coatings. It came out great, and we really liked the natural pine look. We used 1×8 tongue and groove pine for the soffit. The exterior unit of the ductless minisplit. We built the small roof to protect the unit from rain and snow coming off the north side of the main roof.I helped Ray build the first roof and he helped us get started on the second. We took it from there and would end up using the same concept for overhangs over our large south facing windows and the exterior unit of the ductless minisplit. Finishing joists and floorsKyra and I, with help from her dad, continued on various interior projects. I spent multiple days on a stepladder with a face mask and eye protection working on the rough-sawn hemlock floor joists. I used a wire brush to clean them up and did some light sanding. We installed two clear coats of Vermont Natural Coatings. We used Southern yellow pine for the stair treads. We’ll make sure to install the skirtboards first next time.Kyra and her dad also worked on the stairs. The kitchen floor after the application of concrete stain and sealer.In early November 2014, we started finishing our concrete first floor. We had narrowed down our options to hiring a professional to grind and polish the slab or staining and sealing ourselves. Kyra and I decided this would be a good job to take on ourselves and save several thousand dollars. From Eco Safety Products we purchased several concrete finishing products, including their etcher and cleaner, stain, and finish/sealer.The first step was to test colors. We did this in an area that would be hidden later; we decided on the “Black Granite” color for most of the floor area.We tackled the kitchen first so that we could install cabinets before moving on to another floor section. The work was very labor-intensive. The steps consisted of: scrape/sand, clean floor with Simple Green, use etching/cleaning product, let floor dry, install two coats of stain, let dry, and install five or more coats of the finish/sealer.This work also required a lot of vacuuming, taping, rinsing, and the somewhat impossible task of keeping random debris and dog hair off the floor. The work was tiring, but we were happy with how the floors were turning out. We finished the kitchen and saved the other floor areas for later. The rough-sawn 2×12 hemlock floor joists were cleaned with a wire brush, sanded lightly, and protected with a clear finish. The winter of 2013-2014 started without much snow, but progressed into an extended period of cold and snow from February through March. Normally, we’d take advantage of this on skis, but the house project was occupying most of our attention. Drywall, window trim, and interior doorsThe drywall crew completed hanging, taping, and mudding the drywall in early February 2014. We went with rounded corners and the crew did a great job. The interior minisplit unit is on an interior wall in the central part of the first floor. Behind the wall is a small mechanical area, which allowed for easy runs of the lines to the exterior. Septic system and spruce floorsAs spring turned into summer, the septic system was finally inspected, approved, and backfilled.We continued on various interior and exterior projects. I ripped the Vycor Plus flashing tape off the exterior doors, spray foamed any gaps in the rough openings, used Siga Wigluv tape on the exterior part of the rough openings, patched up the housewrap, and installed some pine trim. The first room we finished was the second bedroom.The 2×6 tongue-and-groove spruce used for the second-story floors had gotten pretty beat up during the main construction phase. We rented a commercial orbital floor sander and that (along with some hand-held orbital sander work) did a good job of cleaning up the floors. We used a product from Vermont Natural Coatings (Polywhey Floor Finish) to finish the spruce floors.Kyra and I decided to finish the second bedroom first so it could serve as an initial finished room. We installed some pine baseboard and Kyra tackled the painting.We started by installing horizontal lengths of SV-3 siding vent along the bottom of the wall. Then we stapled the vertical Sturdi-Strips over the 16-inch-on-center studs. The Sturdi-Strips were doubled up on the corners. We installed the pine corner boards before the siding. The goal: an occupancy permitOver the rest of November and December, we continued on interior projects that would help us get an occupancy permit:Kyra and her dad put together the cabinet parts that we would install and secure to the walls later.Kyra and I built simple open vanities for the bathrooms.We had recently hired contractors to tile the shower and bathroom floors, Kyra and her dad installed the shower door.Our plumbing contractor came back to install and hookup the toilets, sinks, and hot water heater.I used my climbing skills and equipment to replace the plumbing vent flashing on the roof as it had a slight leak from a poor install job.Speaking of hot water, we decided on a short 30-gallon Rheem electric-resistance water heater because it was cheap, would meet our needs, and would fit in the mechanical room under the stairs.At this point in the house project, we were working hard towards getting the certificate of occupancy (CO), which we thought we needed to move in. While we had an affordable rental situation with friends, I was really itching to move into the house so we could stop paying rent and not have to commute back and forth. Editor’s note: This is the fourth in a series of blogs chronicling the design and construction of a house owned by Brian Post and Kyra Salancy. The first blog in the series was titled Building a Small House in the White Mountains. RELATED ARTICLES Up Hill HousePretty Good, Not So Big Maine HouseThe Potwine Passivhaus in AmherstKicking the Tires on a Passivhaus ProjectThe Pretty Good HouseMartin’s Pretty Good House ManifestoGreen Building for Beginners There was no functioning kitchen, but the house had heat and functioning bathrooms (see Image #3, below). One day, I met with the Jackson building inspector about our remaining tasks and found out it was OK for us to move in without the CO. That was all I needed to hear.Kyra was worried that the house wouldn’t be comfortable to live in yet, but I convinced her to go for it. In a matter of days, we moved all our belongings up to the house and spent our first night on the floor of the guest bedroom. It was December 23, 2014. We had a long ways to go, but it felt great to be in the house. We were also focusing on the upstairs: painting, installing pine trim, and hanging interior doors. We were trying to keep costs down, but did get affordable solid pine wood doors. With finishing products, we went with no/low VOC and more natural products whenever we could. This included using Vermont Natural Coatings PolyWhey finish on all the pine trim. This Panasonic FV-08VKS3 WhisperGreen bath fan was installed in the upstairs bathroom. The exhaust duct has a short, straight run to the east wall. We installed this fan in a frame below the ceiling so we wouldn’t break our air barrier. The 2x4s will later be trimmed with pine boards.last_img read more

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The Sales Improvement You Need Will Not Be Found in Tools

first_imgThere are people who believe that the choice of medium is the dominant factor for producing results when prospecting. They believe that the tools are what produces a better outcome, that some choice of medium is so much better than another that salespeople should shift their efforts to those tools. This group believes that the primary challenge for salespeople is that they lack the knowledge of how to use the relatively new tools, believing that the primary challenge in selling well today is a lack of training in using them. More still, they believe that single change worth noting as it pertains to sales results is the internet, when in fact, it is one of many, and not the most important.Like those who have tried to improve sales effectiveness in the past, they look for things that can easily be trained and employed. Like the sales manager that attempts to improve sales by demanding more activity because he is at a total loss as to how to help people become more effective, this group of people believes that shifting the focus to the use of new tools will increase the salesperson’s effectiveness. The tools, however, do not increase a salesperson’s effectiveness, even if they improve their efficiency.The tools do not create any value for the client to suggest that the salesperson using a certain tool is someone worth meeting with, someone with the business acumen or situational knowledge to improve their future results. If there is a challenge in prospecting now, it is a lack of value being traded for time, not the medium being used to make the ask.The tools offer nothing when it comes to controlling the process, gaining the commitments necessary to consult with clients and help them make the changes they need to make inside their own company. They offer even less when it comes to helping deal with a client’s internal conflicts, competing priorities, and a systemic resistance to change.The new tools do nothing to improve the intangibles that weigh heavily in a decision to buy from one person instead of another. They don’t make one a peer, provide executive presence, or create a preference to work with an individual or their company.The poor thinking here is that the tools are what is missing when it comes to producing better results. The tools themselves provide no insight. They produce no content; they only deliver the content. They are not a reason for a client to take a meeting or to decide to engage with a salesperson. Those who focus on tools inflate the value of them to a level they cannot possibly deliver.The tools available to you in sales are useful, but they are not enough to make you an effective salesperson. In most cases, they are a distraction from the real challenges of selling well, and your efforts are better spent working on the messenger and not the medium.last_img read more

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ONE: Yuya Wakamatsu looking for knockout against debuting Demetrious Johnson

first_imgONE ChampionshipTOKYO, Japan—Hard-hitting Yuya Wakamatsu has the unenviable task of welcoming one of the best pound-for-pound fighters in the world in Demetrious Johnson under the ONE Championship banner on Sunday night.But while all eyes will be on the debuting Johnson, Wakamatsu is dead set on stealing his thunder.ADVERTISEMENT Wakamatsu wants no less than a win in front of his hometown crowd and he wants it to be in spectacular fashion.“I would like to knock out Demetrious Johnson. That is what I’m aiming for, that is what I want,” Wakamatsu said through a translator during a star-studded ONE: A New Era press conference on Thursday at the Ritz-Carlton here.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logistics“Many are doubting me in this fight against Demetrious but I’m born for this,” he added as he faces Johnson in a Flyweight World Grand Prix quarterfinal at the historic Ryogoku Kokugikan.Coming up with a bold fight plan is one thing and executing it an entirely different story especially when knocking out Johnson hasn’t been done before. Trump tells impeachment jokes at annual turkey pardon event Wintry storm delivers US travel woes before Thanksgiving Colombia protesters vow new strike after talks hit snag LATEST STORIES MOST READ The 32-year-old Johnson has never been stopped through 30 fights with his three losses coming via decision.The heavy-handed Wakamatsu has made a career out of knocking his opponents out with nine of his 10 wins coming by stoppage due to strikes.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Bloomberg: US would benefit from more, not fewer, immigrants Rockets lock down on Nuggets for easy win Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Google Philippines names new country director PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Panelo: Duterte ‘angry’ with SEA Games hosting hassles Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess View commentslast_img read more

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