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Ohio State’s Tattoo Gate, Alabama’s T-Town and other scandals that would be legal under new NIL rules

first_imgIU faced a choice: It could suspend Alford for the next game — just happened that it was the annual Kentucky showdown — or wait and take the matter to the NCAA infractions committee, where something along the lines of a three-game suspension was possible. Knight chose the one-game option, and the Hoosiers lost to Kentucky.  Johnny Football’s autographsThere was nothing dull about Johnny Manziel’s career as the quarterback at Texas A&M. The 2012 Heisman Trophy winner got into hot water with the NCAA for allegedly being paid a “five-figure flat fee” for signing merchandise before the 2013 BCS title game in Miami. And several other reports circulated about similar “scandals,” but there was no proof found. There was no incentive for anyone to talk with the NCAA, and, basically, no paper trail meant no way to severely punish Manziel. He was suspended for the first half of A&M’s 2013 season-opening home game against Rice. But the basics are this: Players will be allowed to make money for product endorsements, social media content and autographs. That’s a massive change. And it’s a frustrating change for certain fan bases that have seen their favorite programs dragged through the NCAA mud for violations that were ridiculous when they happened and would be fully legal and above board now. Here are four examples. It’s not a comprehensive list, of course — for example, we’re not diving into Georgia’s A.J. Green being suspended four games for selling his bowl-game jersey for $1,000 in 2010 — but just some high-profile examples. Ohio State’s Tattoo GateFive Ohio State players, including star quarterback Terrelle Pryor, were suspended for the first five games of the 2011 season for selling merchandise and receiving “improper benefits” from a tattoo parlor. The players sold Big Ten championship rings — from teams they played on — and their own football jerseys/pants/shoes, and Pryor sold a sportsmanship award he received after the 2008 Fiesta Bowl. In addition to the five-game suspension, players had to repay various amounts based on what they’d sold. The scandal ultimately led to the resignation of head coach Jim Tressel. The discount at the tattoo parlor was what seized the headlines, though, partially because it was such a stupid thing to have a rule against. “As a student-athlete,” Ohio State athletic director Gene Smith said at the time, “you’re not allowed to use your persona to get discounted services.”But starting in 2021-22? Use all the “persona” you want to get tattoos (or anything else), athletes. And Gene Smith, by the way, is co-chair of the NIL committee.Alabama’s T-Town scandalThis one never resulted in actual NCAA punishments — a source of frustration for everyone other than Alabama fans — but it dominated the headlines for several months in 2011 (and again in 2014). There was a shop in Tuscaloosa, T-Town Menswear, that had a massive collection of items autographed by former and current Alabama football players. The “current players” part was the sticky issue. There were also plenty of photos with the current football players posing with the shop’s owner, Tom Albetar, and while wearing merchandise that was available for purchase in the store. The questions were obvious: What were the players getting in exchange for all the autographs and pictures? That question was never officially answered, which was part of the reason for a lack of punishment. Alabama sent a cease-and-desist letter to Albetar and disassociated him from the program. But, if nothing else, the photos of the current players were on display at the store, and they were pretty clearly being used to promote the store. That’s a violation, too. It was a silly violation then, and starting in the 2021-22 school year, it won’t be a violation at all. Steve Alford’s charity calendarThis “violation” drove Indiana fans crazy at the time and it still gets their Hoosier blood boiling, as it rightly should. Steve Alford was their home-grown superstar in the middle of a legendary career in Bloomington. He’d represented the school in the 1984 Olympic Games and would lead the Hoosiers to the 1987 National Championship. He averaged nearly 17 points per game his first two seasons at IU, but he was forced to miss his team’s December 1985 rivalry game against Kentucky, in his junior season, because of a violation of NCAA rules. What did Alford do? He posed for a charity calendar for the Gamma Phi Beta sorority. Yep. He wasn’t paid for the appearance, and the calendar raised money for charity. But because the calendar was used to make money — didn’t matter how the money was used — that was a violation. When IU coach Bobby Knight heard about the calendar, he immediately self-reported the violation to the NCAA.  The NCAA announced its intention to start allowing its student-athletes to make money off their name, image and likeness on Wednesday morning. It’s a decision that’s been long awaited, and is certainly long overdue. There are still questions, though, because there are always questions with complicated issues. What is permissible and what is not permissible — and exactly how those hairs are going to be split — will have to be seen. The Board of Governors approved the NIL proposals, and a vote is expected to be taken in January 2021 for adoption for the 2021-22 academic year. last_img read more

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BC Mine Developers Defend NearBorder Projects

first_imgWe’ve heard a lot about mines planned for northwest British Columbia, just across Alaska’s border.Southeast tribal, fishing and environmental groups have blasted those plans. Critics say they’ll pollute rivers that cross the border, damaging or destroying salmon and other fish runs.The KSM Prospect is inland from Southeast Alaska. (Courtesy SEACC)But we haven’t heard a lot from mine advocates. Now, we have.Much of the recent focus has been on what’s called the Kerr-Sulphurets-Mitchell or KSMProject, being developed by Seabridge Gold.The site, which also includes copper, is roughly 80 miles east of Wrangell.Critics say it could damage the Unuk River, which flows into the ocean northeast of Ketchikan.Seabridge says that’s not the case. Brent Murphy is the corporation’s vice president of environmental affairs“The concern with minimizing downstream environmental impacts has been the guiding principal behind the whole design of the mining project,” Murphy says.Critics say the KSM could be about the same size as the proposed Pebble Prospect, a controversial mine proposed for Southwest Alaska.They worry about plans for huge, dammed tailing lakes that could leak or break, sending acidic water into nearby streams and rivers.Murphy says they’ll be built in a valley that drains into Canadian, not Alaskan, waters.“The dams will be of a design which has been utilized worldwide. And these dams are extremely stable over the long term,” he says.And what is the estimated life of those dams?“They have to last for the 52 years of operations. And then we will reclaim that and they will last into perpetuity.”Seabridge Gold has been working on the project since 2008. Murphy says even if everything goes its way, operations won’t begin until the 2020.“You don’t build a mine overnight,” says Karina Brino, president of the Mining Association of British Columbia.“There are a series of authorizations and permits from different levels of government that are required. And other than the Red Chris Mine, in the northwest, all the other projects are in exploration stages,” she says.The Red Chris Mine is in the upper watershed of the Stikine River, which ends near Petersburg and Wrangell. It’s owned by Imperial Metals.Another project of concern is the long-closed Tulsequah Chief Mine, which Chieftain Metals Corp is trying to reopen. It’s on a tributary of the Taku River, which ends near Juneau.Critics, including the group Rivers Without Borders, are concerned about silt, acid discharge and dangerous metals.The Mining Association’s Brino says the same is true for her industry.“Our objective is to minimize impact. Our objective is to be stewards of the environment as much as anybody else would want us to be,” she says.So, does the industry care about concerns from this side of the border?“Absolutely,” Brino says. “My expectation would be that there is participation, hopefully meaningful participation, from your side of the border in the review of these projects.”Seabridge Gold official Murphy says his company has consulted with Alaska officials once or twice a year since the project began. They’ve also been brought to the KSM mine site.He says the project needs about 150 permits from the provincial and federal governments.“We will have to do a lot of work in order to gather the information that will be needed to satisfy the … questions from our regulatory authorities,” Murphy says.Seabridge just began a season of exploratory drilling at the site. That will help better define where the minerals are, and how much may be there.last_img read more

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Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impa

first_img Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impact Arizona Cardinals running back Kerwynn Williams (33) scores a touchdown as Denver Broncos linebacker Zaire Anderson (47) defends during the second half of an NFL preseason football game, Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015, in Denver. (AP Photo/Jack Dempsey) The Arizona Cardinals promoted running back Kerwynn Williams from the practice squad to the active roster Saturday and released tight end Joseph Fauria.5-foot-eight, 198-pound Williams played in five December games for the Cards last season and recorded 246 rushing yards on 53 carries for a 4.6 yard average. He’s been playing on the Cardinals practice squad since September 5 when he was cut from the active roster. Fauria played the past two seasons and the 2015 preseason with the Detroit Lions and did not play last week for the Cardinals in their game against the New Orleans Saints. He has 24 receptions and 287 yards for his career. The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo Comments   Share   center_img – / 21 Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Top Stories last_img read more

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