Tag: 爱上海同城aish

Good results for local Long Track Skaters at Championships

first_imgIn Male T2T 12, Matthew Mitchell received Gold. Emerson Bigras also participated in this category but, after a good effort, was unable to grab a medal.Sidney Bennie picked up Gold in Female T2T 13.In the Male T2T, Nicholas Guliov won Gold and Dakotah Ruel, of Dawson Creek, won Silver. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The 2019 B.C. Long Track Championships were held in Fort St. John over the weekend.127 skaters participated in this year’s Long Track Championship, with 12 clubs being represented from across B.C.Long Track Skaters from the Fort St. John Elks Speed Skating Club had a good performance at the Championships.- Advertisement -In the L2T B Male category, Kallum Dunn won Gold.Austin MacGregor received Iron in L2T A Male.Emma North won Gold and Cheyanne Key won Bronze in Female T2T 12.Advertisementlast_img read more

Read more…

Viswanathan Anand holds Hikaru Nakmura in Sinquefield Cup first round

first_imgViswanathan Anand, the five-time world champion, started the Sinquefield Cup with a draw against USA’s Hikaru Nakmura on Saturday. Sinquefield Cup in St. Louis is a part of the Grand Chess tour.Anand, who finished last in the rapid and blitz event earlier this month, did not give Nakamura any chance to hold the American to an easy draw.The pieces changed hands at regular intervals as Anand equalised with a typical central breakthrough in the middle game and the players arrived at a drawn queen and pawns endgame in quick time where the peace was a just result.Shakhriyar Mamedyarov of Azerbaijan got off to a flier cruising past Wesley So of the US.In the other decisive game of the day, Levon Aronian of Armenia came up with a brilliant endgame show to beat Sergey Karjakin of Russia.The other two games in the ten-player round-robin tournament ended in draws as Maxime Vachier-Lagrave split the point with world champion Magnus Carlsen of Norway and USA’s Fabiano Caruana could not make much headway against Alexander Grischuk of Russia.With eight rounds still remaining in the 300000 USD prize money tournament, Mamedyarov and Aronian emerged as early leaders with one point, while Anand, Nakamura, Carlsen, Vachier-Lagrave, Caruana and Grischuk follow them at half point behind.It turned out to be a good day for Mamedyarov who enjoyed his typical variety of chess with complications remaining for the major part.Until a week ago, Wesley So was leading the Grand Chess tour but the pounding in rapid and blitz and the first round loss here means that the Filipino-turned-American will have to recover lost ground.advertisementIt was another Queen’s gambit declined of the day but Mamedyarov put pressure on the king side to win a pawn by force. The technicalities remained but the Azerbaijani made it look like child’s play and it was a picturesque finale where the checkmate was imminent.Aronian outwitted Karjakin out of a Berlin defense game as white. Slow manoeuvring throughout the game out of a level position ensued in the queen-less middle game and Karjakin was the first to err. Aronian wrapped it up in 69 moves.Results round 1: Hikaru Nakamura (Usa) drew with V Anand (Ind); Maxime Vachier-Lagrave (Fra) drew with Magnus Carlsen (Nor); Fabiano Caruana (Usa) drew with Alexander Grischuk (Rus); Shakhriyar Mamedyarov (Aze) beat Wesley So (Usa); Levon Aronian (Arm) beat Sergey Karjakin (Rus).(With inputs from PTI)last_img read more

Read more…

SAINTS have announced an exclusive fouryear partn

first_imgSAINTS have announced an exclusive four-year partnership with Robinsons Brewery; one of the UK’s oldest family brewers.Robinsons will continue to be the club’s Official Drinks Partner – a position they have held since 2012.The significant deal will see the Stockport Brewer have exclusive ‘pouring rights’ within the 18,000-seater stadium whilst continuing to brew the rugby club’s popular own Saints Gold; a 4% ABV golden ale.Speaking about the partnership, Mike Rush, Saints Chief Executive, said: “We are really pleased to continue our excellent relationship with Robinsons Brewery.“They are a proactive and a much-valued partner whose values closely align to our own.“Since we moved into the stadium we have worked together to bring innovative products and value for money for our fans and customers. The extension of the contract signifies how pleased both parties are with the relationship.“We look forward to enhancing that over the next four years.”Ben Robinson, Director of Sales for Robinsons Brewery, added: “We’re very proud of our ongoing relationship with St. Helens R.F.C.; one of the biggest club sides in the world.“This partnership allows us to continue to grow the presence of our beers and the commitment and significant investment from both parties is a sign of our long-term ambition in the region. We look forward to growing an even greater relationship with the club and their fans over the coming years.”The new deal will also see Robinsons working closely with Halewood Wines & Spirits, the international drinks company behind Crabbie’s Alcoholic Ginger Beer – St. Helens official away kit partner – for the first time.Ben added: “It’s great to see two North West companies coming together to support local sport in the region. Working with Halewood will not only help the club from a sponsorship point of view but it will also allow us to supply a whole new range of exciting products to the passionate fans of the club.”The picture shows Tom Hill (Robinsons Free Trade Area Manager), Tommy Martyn (St.Helens R.F.C. Bar & Cellar Manager), Ben Robinson (Robinsons Director of Sales), Mike Rush (St.Helens R.F.C. Chief Executive), Dave Hutchinson (St.Helens R.F.C. General Manager).last_img read more

Read more…

A dab of water aids carbon capture

first_img Adding water to asphalt-derived porous carbon improves its ability to sequester carbon dioxide at natural gas wellheads, according to Rice University researchers. The porous particles in the illustration are combined with water and then heated to remove excess water from the pores. The water that remains binds to the pore structures. Under pressures above 20 atmospheres, the filter material sequesters carbon dioxide and allows methane molecules to pass through. AddThis Return to article. Long DescriptionAdding water to asphalt-derived porous carbon improves its ability to sequester carbon dioxide at natural gas wellheads, according to Rice University researchers. The porous particles in the illustration are combined with water and then heated to remove excess water from the pores. The water that remains binds to the pore structures. Under pressures above 20 atmospheres, the filter material sequesters carbon dioxide and allows methane molecules to pass through. Illustration by Almaz JalilovNatural gas at the wellhead typically contains between 3 and 7 percent carbon dioxide, but at some locations may contain up to 70 percent. Oil and gas producers traditionally use one of two strategies to sequester carbon dioxide: physically through the use of membranes or solid sorbents like zeolites or porous carbons, or chemically through filtering with liquid amine, a derivative of ammonia.But both these methods have drawbacks. Physical filters have a hard time differentiating between carbon dioxide and methane molecules, which are nearly identical in size (3.3 to 3.8 angstroms) and polarizability (important to bonding characteristics). Chemical approaches have better selectivity but are more expensive and corrosive, and they require a large input of energy and large equipment. Despite their high selectivity, amines capture only 13 percent by weight in carbon dioxide and need superheated steam to recycle the filtration system, Tour said, while the Rice team’s system is capturing more than 200 percent by weight and no thermal source is needed.The new Rice material features the selectivity of amines, much higher uptake of carbon dioxide and no thermal requirements, he said. Coating the pore surfaces with water adds weak chemical absorption and high selectivity while retaining the material’s strong physical adsorption.“This is known as a pressure-swing adsorption system, which is easy to implement due to its small size, and there’s no need for heating since it works with the inherent pressure in the gas well,” Tour said.Water in Gilsonite forms a hydrate within pore microstructures that greatly increases the binding selectivity of carbon dioxide over methane, according to the researchers. While the grains’ micropores, at 23 angstroms, are far larger than the target molecules, the addition of water tightens the pores and decreases the pore volume through which the molecules must travel. The prepared Gilsonite has a surface area of 4,200 square meters per gram, so adding water still leaves plenty of room to capture carbon dioxide, Tour said.Over multiple testing cycles at various pressures and temperatures between freezing and 50 degrees Celsius, degradation of the material was reportedly negligible. The researchers found that about 1 percent weight of the water content was lost during cycling but determined the water content of natural gas itself would likely replace that.Almaz Jalilov, a former postdoctoral researcher at Rice and now an assistant professor at King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Saudi Arabia, is lead author of the study. Co-authors are Rice graduate student Yilun Li and research scientist Carter Kittrell. Tour is the T.T. and W.F. Chao Chair in Chemistry as well as a professor of computer science and of materials science and nanoengineering at Rice.Apache Corp. supported the research.-30-Read the abstract at https://www.nature.com/articles/s41560-017-0030-yFollow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNewsRelated materials:Asphalt-based carbon-capture material advances: http://news.rice.edu/2016/09/12/asphalt-based-carbon-capture-material-advances/Tour Group: http://www.jmtour.comWiess School of Natural Sciences: http://natsci.rice.eduImage for download: Adding water to asphalt-derived porous carbon improves its ability to sequester carbon dioxide at natural gas wellheads, according to Rice University researchers. The porous particles in the illustration are combined with water and then heated to remove excess water from the pores. The water that remains binds to the pore structures. Under pressures above 20 atmospheres, the filter material sequesters carbon dioxide and allows methane molecules to pass through. ShareNEWS RELEASEEditor’s note: A link to an image for download appears at the end of this release.David Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduMike Williams713-348-6728mikewilliams@rice.eduA dab of water aids carbon captureRice University advances asphalt-based filter to sequester greenhouse gas at wellheadHOUSTON – (Dec. 11, 2017) – Rice University scientists have found a way to make their asphalt-based sorbents better at capturing carbon dioxide from gas wells: Just add water.The Rice lab of chemist James Tour discovered that treating grains of inexpensive Gilsonite asphalt with water allows the material to adsorb more than two times its weight in the greenhouse gas. The treated asphalt selects carbon dioxide over valuable methane at a ratio of more than 200-to-1.The material performs well at ambient temperatures and under the pressures typically found at wellheads. When the pressure abates, the material releases the carbon dioxide, which can then be stored, sold for other industrial uses or pumped back downhole.The research appears this month in Nature Energy. http://news.rice.edu/files/2017/10/1030_ASPHALT-1-WEB-2loex0w.jpgAdding water to asphalt-derived porous carbon improves its ability to sequester carbon dioxide at natural gas wellheads, according to Rice University researchers. The porous particles in the illustration are combined with water and then heated to remove excess water from the pores. The water that remains binds to the pore structures. Under pressures above 20 atmospheres, the filter material sequesters carbon dioxide and allows methane molecules to pass through. (Credit: Almaz Jalilov/Rice University)Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,879 undergraduates and 2,861 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for quality of life and for lots of race/class interaction and No. 2 for happiest students by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/RiceUniversityoverview. Return to article. Long Descriptionlast_img read more

Read more…