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War-torn Yemen reports coronavirus cases in three more provinces

first_imgYemen is divided between the internationally recognized government based in the south and the Iran-aligned Houthi movement headquartered in the north. The Houthis ousted the government from power in the capital, Sanaa, in late 2014.The World Health Organization says it fears COVID-19 could rip through Yemen as the population has some of the lowest levels of immunity to disease compared with other countries. Minimal testing capacity has added to concerns.The five-year war has shattered Yemen’s health system and left its population weakened by hunger and disease. Around 80% of the population, or 24 million people, rely on humanitarian aid and 10 million are at risk of starvation.The Aden government has now reported infections in seven provinces under its control, stretching from the Red Sea in the west to the Omani border in the country’s east. Yemen’s Saudi-backed government reported outbreaks of the new coronavirus in three more southern provinces on Tuesday, taking the total number of cases in areas under its control to 65, with 10 deaths.The Aden-based government’s coronavirus committee said nine new COVID-19 cases had been confirmed, including for the first time in the provinces of Abyan, al-Mahra and Shabwa, where one person died.Four more infections were reported in Aden, the government’s interim seat, taking the total there to 39. Topics :center_img The Houthis have so far reported only two infections, with one death, from the novel coronavirus, both in Sanaa.The Aden government reported Yemen’s first case on April 10 in a southern port town and there have been almost daily announcements of new cases over the past 12 days.The United Nations said on Monday the recent sharp rise in cases indicated the virus had been circulating undetected for weeks, increasing the likelihood of a surge in cases.last_img read more

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Friday people roundup

first_imgEuropean Commission, BNP Paribas Investment Partners, Newton Investment Management, Nykredit Asset Management, BankInvest, AP1, Westchester Group, La FrançaiseEuropean Commission – Jonathan Hill has been confirmed as the next commissioner for Financial Services, winning over doubters in his second hearing. The former leader of the UK House of Lords won the vote to be confirmed in the College of Commissioners by 45 votes to 13. An additional vote by members of the Economic and Monetary Affairs Committee backed him as commissioner for Financial Stability, Financial Services and Capital Markets Union by 42 to 16.BNP Paribas Investment Partners – Susan Gostick has been appointed head of the pension fund segment at the French asset manager. Based in London, she will focus of adding to the company’s pensions business. She joins from Newton Investment Management, where she was head of institutional relations. She has also worked at Lazard Asset Management.BankInvest –Lars Bo Bertram has been appointed as the new chief executive of Danish investment manager BankInvest. He will take on the role at both BI Holding and the BankInvest Group. Bo Bertram is currently bank executive board member and head of Nykredit Asset Management. At Nykredit, he is responsible for investment management and investment fund administration. Before that, he worked for Danske Bank. He is also chairman of the CFA Society Denmark. Bo Bertram will leave Nykredit’s executive board with effect from today. Following his departure, the board will comprise managing directors Bjørn Mortensen, Georg Andersen and Jesper Berg. Bo Bertram will be stepping into the shoes of BankInvest’s current chief executive Bo Foged, who – as reported by IPE in May – has been appointed group finance director at Danish statutory pension fund ATP. The two will change roles on 1 January 2015. AP1 – Kaj Martensen has been appointed COO at the Swedish buffer fund, replacing Anders Rahmn, who is set to retire. Martensen will also join the fund’s management board. He will begin his new role at the start of 2015, with Rahmn stepping down at the end of February. Martensen joins from Shell Asset Management in the Netherlands.Westchester Group – Martin Davies has joined the farmland investment specialist as executive vice-president and chief executive of its Europe office. Westchester is majority owned by US pension provider TIAA-CREF, whose asset management arm recently opened a UK office. He joins from Insight Investment and was behind its farmland investment business for the past five years. He will now manage the company’s business in Europe and build its European farmland investment business.La Française – Pierre Schoeffler has joined the French asset manager as a senior global asset allocation adviser, working across the group’s entire asset offering. He remains chairman of S&Partners, an asset allocation consultancy he founded in 2004, and is a senior adviser at IEIF, a real estate investment research centre and consultancy.last_img read more

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Statoil Joins GCE Subsea Cluster

first_imgGCE Subsea informed that Statoil has come onboard as a new industry partner in the GCE Subsea Cluster.“Being the largest company in Norway and one of the most capable and competent subsea companies in the world it is of great importance, and a great pleasure, to announce our partnership,” said Owe Hagesæther, CEO of GCE Subsea.“Statoil values the clusters national and international network and their driving role in industry driven R&D and innovation processes,” said Stein Olav Drange, vice president Technology Management in Statoil. “We also focus on building relations with the Oceans Industries Incubator and the Startup and ScaleUp programmes and companies in GCE Subsea, and believe that GCE Subsea will prove to be a useful arena for innovation relevant to our value chain.”GCE Subsea has 23 partners within industry, R&D, academia and public offices.The cluster’s main hub is located at the Coast Center Base at Ågotnes west of Bergen, one of the largests bases for subsea aftermarket activities.“GCE Subsea is one of Norway’s three Global Centres of Expertise representing most professional and important industry. We are excited to have Statoil onboard as a partner. This will strengthen the cluster significantly, and add force to our effort implementing our strategy for the Norwegian subsea industry,” Hagesæther said.last_img read more

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Former guard Louie McCroskey discusses perception of Jim Boeheim, drug policy, 2 key figures in NCAA report

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Former Syracuse guard Louie McCroskey, who played for the Orange from 2003-06 before transferring, offered his reaction to the penalties levied on his former school.McCroskey also discussed the team’s drug policy — which he was unaware of, the public’s perception of head coach Jim Boeheim and how he thinks athletes are framed in NCAA cases.He also explained his relationship with two people who are repeatedly mentioned in the NCAA’s 94-page report — Stan Kissel, often referred to in the report as the director of basketball operations, and Jeff Cornish, who The Post-Standard has identified as “the representative” named in the report.Perception of Jim BoeheimMcCroskey left SU after the 2005-06 season because he said he thought Boeheim and the coaching staff only saw him as a utility on the court, and not as a person off it. He said he thought he’d get support for wanting to better his basketball career somewhere else, but instead received “backlash” from the coaches.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textMcCroskey went on to say that while he has tried to detach himself from Boeheim on a personal level, the head coach deserves the respect he gets for building the Syracuse program to what it has become.Still, he admitted his former head coach isn’t perceived well in the public eye.“You’ve got to look at it from two different perspectives, like is he well-liked and stuff like that,” McCroskey said. “I don’t think he necessarily cares.“He says what he wants and he does things his own way. People don’t necessarily like him. He either likes you or he don’t. If he doesn’t like you, he gives you a hard time.”Relationship with Stan Kissel and Jeff CornishA frequent mention in the NCAA report, Kissel is near the heart of the violations. Still, McCroskey defended the man he said was always “cool” with him.“If you ever needed the help and you ever needed a tutor, he was the first guy to always be like, ‘All right, I’m going to try and hook you up with this tutor,’” McCroskey said. “Stan was always a great guy. “Cornish, the former sports director at the Oneida YMCA criticized for illegally paying athletes, also had a good rapport with McCroskey, he said.“When people are saying this stuff, it kind of makes me laugh because I’m like, ‘Well I never received any money,” McCroskey said. “If you didn’t have a father, he was a guy who was always around, there to talk to people if you need him, stuff like that.“I’ve never really looked at him as a booster or that type of guy.”The drug policyAccording to the NCAA’s report, Syracuse violated its own drug policy on more than one occasion.McCroskey said he wasn’t aware of a specific drug policy, just that he wasn’t supposed to do drugs and that he’d receive random drug tests.“(The coaches) never told us about drugs because I guess they assumed most guys didn’t use drugs,” he said.McCroskey mentioned how he received a random drug test “a few times” in between the end of the regular season and beginning of the Big East tournament. But it was never Boeheim or any of the coaches who educated the players on drug tests.“I just heard it from trainers and stuff when they would be like, ‘You guys are going to get a random drug test, so you shouldn’t be doing drugs at all,” McCroskey said. “That was more of the conversation.”Framing of athletesWhen an athlete’s name goes in the media for an academic violation, McCroskey said he frowns upon the circus that ensues.“I don’t like how grown adults, mostly with family and children, like to single out kids,” McCroskey said. “You’re going to have Fab Melo’s name in the paper, right? And Syracuse fans will go crazy and say, ‘Oh, that’s a dummy’ and this and that.“People don’t understand that has to follow them for the rest of their lives, you know what I mean, so it better be true.”He said too many people think of student-athletes as “dumb squares,” but in fact they’re very aware of what’s going on. Sometimes, he added, athletes are just afraid to speak up and defend themselves.Reaction to the sanctionsMcCroskey didn’t expect the NCAA to come down as hard as it did, and expressed his sympathy for the current SU players who won’t get to play in the postseason.“It’s really unfortunate for the players because at the end of the day, Rakeem Christmas, (Trevor) Cooney, all these guys,” he said. “They work hard for years and now they’re the ones getting penalized for something that didn’t even have anything to do with them.”He said he feels for the fans and all those involved since there are a lot of people, both fans and players, in it for the right reason.Said McCroskey: “I’m sure if (the NCAA’s) done all this research and they found stuff, then obviously it is what it is.” Comments Published on March 8, 2015 at 6:59 pm Contact Matt: mcschnei@syr.edu | @matt_schneidmanlast_img read more

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