Tag: 浙江论坛天涯社区

Development issue spotlight on access to credit

first_imgThis is the fourth of the 12-part series on our blog highlighting the 12 major development issues.  In case you missed it, last month we discussed education, which can be found here.  This month we are focusing on access to credit.Access to credit seems to be an easy development issue for credit unions to solve – as we are in the loan business.  Yet millions of Americans are paying obscenely high interest rates on loans to buy a new car, fund school clothes or even purchase a week’s groceries.  Credit unions need to build business models that are mutually beneficial –affordable rates and attractive terms and conditions for members and a product that presents a good business opportunity for the credit union.  Seems easy but unfortunately credit unions struggle to find the right balance between business and social values.  In my work, I have run across many credit unions that offer some great lending products that could be done in most credit unions.  I’m going to focus on three different credit unions who provide good examples of lending products:University Federal Credit Union in Austin, Texas gets it.  More than 10 years ago, the credit union began offering non-prime auto loans to members with credit scores below 640. continue reading » 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Thai police arrest gunman for killing ex-wife at shopping mall

first_imgTopics : A man killed his ex-wife and wounded another person at a shopping center in Bangkok on Tuesday, police said, just 10 days after a mass shooting at another mall in Thailand’s northeast.The man had gone into a beauty clinic at Century The Movie Plaza mall where his ex-wife worked and opened fire, killing her and wounding a bystander, Colonel Kissana Pattanacharoen said.The gunman was arrested while on the run in another province, police said on Wednesday morning. He was charged with premeditated murder and illegal gun possession, and three other charges.The shooting came with Thailand on edge after the shooting rampage earlier in the month.On Feb. 8 and 9, a soldier killed at least a dozen people at the Terminal 21 shopping center in the city of Nakhon Ratchasima. He had earlier killed his commanding officer, other soldiers at his base and several people at a Buddhist temple.Gun ownership is relatively common in Thailand, with about 10 million privately owned firearms in the country in 2016, according to Gunpolicy.org, or one for about every seven citizens.Gun violence killed 1,729 people in 2016, about 10 times the rate per 100,000 as in neighboring Malaysia, the organization said.Most violence involving firearms stem from personal disputes or robberies. Mass shootings or killings in public spaces are rare other than in the far south, where a decades-old insurgency persists.last_img read more

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Panel Endorses HPV Vaccine for Boys of 11

first_imgNew York Times 25 Oct 2011Boys and young men should be vaccinated against human papillomavirus, or HPV, to protect against anal and throat cancers that can result from sexual activity, a federal advisory committee said Tuesday. The recommendation by the panel, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is likely to transform the use of the HPV vaccine, since most private insurers pay for vaccines once the committee recommends them for routine use.…The vaccine has been controversial because the disease it prevents results from sexual activity, and that controversy is likely to intensify with the committee’s latest recommendation since many of the cancers in men result from homosexual sex. …Parents of boys face some uncomfortable realities when choosing whether to have their child vaccinated. The burden of disease in males results mostly from oral or anal sex, but vaccinating boys will also benefit female partners since cervical cancer in women results mostly from vaginal sex with infected males. …Vaccinating homosexual boys would be far more cost effective than vaccinating all boys, since the burden of disease is far higher in homosexuals. “But it’s not necessarily effective or perhaps even appropriate to be making those determinations at the 11- to 12-year-old age,” said Kristen R. Ehresmann of the Minnesota Department of Health and a committee member.http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/26/health/policy/26vaccine.html?ref=healthFamily First Comment: We quote directly from the US-based Family Research CouncilThe public health case for boys to receive the vaccine is weaker than it is for girls. When a man contracts HPV, the result is usually genital warts (a much less serious symptom than cervical cancer), so it is questionable if the benefit is worth the cost (almost $400 for the three shots). The CDC is quick to point out that the vaccine also protects against anal, mouth, and throat cancer–but they downplay the fact that these cancers are almost entirely the result of men having homosexual sex!Apart from the cost of the shots (upwards of $140 million a year), perhaps the most infuriating aspect of all this is the government’s insistence that we look for ways to minimize the impact of promiscuity instead of working to encourage the end of it. Rather than asking young people to change their behavior, society is scrambling to enable it. It’s like trying to address the problem of drunk driving by making better airbags. We can’t tackle long-term safety with short-term solutions. And unfortunately, tiptoeing around the fundamental problem–premarital sex and homosexual sex–shows how far off course we are.Vaccinating against HPV, while important, won’t inoculate people from the other negative consequences of promiscuous sex–many of which are just as destructive. Some people have argued that it’s “ethical” for boys to be vaccinated to protect their future sexual partners, but the most ethical answer of all is focusing on abstinence, which is the only 100% effective way to prevent all of the dangerous side-effects of sex outside of marriage. Of course, we’re all told that it’s unrealistic to think young people can abstain. But it’s only unrealistic to the degree that we fail to challenge them to do so!last_img read more

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Brewers’ Weeks to miss rest of season

first_imgST. LOUIS (AP) — Milwaukee Brewers second baseman Rickie Weeks will miss the rest of the season because of a tear in his left wrist, a severe setback for the NL Central leaders.Weeks hurt himself while striking out Sunday in St. Louis. He had an MRI exam Monday in Arizona, and it revealed the injury.The oft-injured Weeks was hitting .272 with nine home runs and 24 RBIs. The Brewers reached the playoffs last year as the wild-card team.The Brewers said Weeks had a torn sheath in his left wrist and will likely have surgery this week. Recovery time is four to six months.“Rickie was making progress. He was showing he could be the kind of player we all thought he could be,” Brewers general manager Doug Melvin said before Monday night’s game at St. Louis.“You feel bad for the team, but you feel bad for Rickie, too,” he said. “He put so much work into it.”Melvin said Craig Counsell will fill in at second base for Weeks for the time being.Melvin noted Weeks was on a pace to score 100 runs and have 100 RBIs this year. Weeks was the overall No. 2 pick in the 2003 draft.Weeks was hurt on his final swing in the first inning. “I just felt a little pressure, a little tug on it,” he said after the 8-2 win over the Cardinals.Weeks missed the last two months of the 2006 season after undergoing surgery for a tendon injury to his right wrist. He was examined by Dr. Don Sheridan, who performed that operation as well as one on his left thumb in 2005.last_img read more

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