Tag: 泰州桑拿

Courageousness in The Mix Of Ebola

first_imgAs we head towards the one-year anniversary of Ebola’s attack on Liberia’s terrain, bearing in mind brave people and their contribution towards the fight is essential.A young female journalist who says she endured the reality of Ebola, its destruction and how it turned citizens of Liberia into paranoid and cautious individuals wants her story told.In the early part of March 2014, Yewa Sandy, a multi-media journalist says she awoke to the death news of two popular doctors in the Caldwell community – doctor’s whose names she says should not be mentioned.“Mainly because I get flash backs of what happened to me the day I tried to do my job as a reporter, I don’t want that to happen again,” she says.“First thing that came to my mind the day I heard that the two doctors had passed away days apart, was that Ebola was definitely real and ready to kill.  And with the instinct of any journalist, I went to find out details,” she recalled.According to the single mother of two, she ran to the scene of where the two late doctors had lived. Unaware that the homes of both doctors had been quarantined, she says, she leaped head on into a danger zone.“I never knew what Ebola was and how dangerous it could be if I was exposed to it. The only thing on my mind at that moment was getting details of how the doctors passed away,” she admitted.Upon arriving on the scene, Yewa says she met dozens of people standing in and around the premises of the late doctors. And like any journalist would have done in her situation, she began to gather her information.“People started yelling at me that Ebola was not real and that both doctors hadn’t died from it. It became so intense for me that within a split second, I was jumped on, assaulted and aggressively handled by men and women of all ages,” she recalls.Yewa and the group of people who held her under arrest for “doing her job” were taken to Zone 7 Base police station in Caldwell. It was there that the officer of the zone explained to the angry crowd that Yewa was a journalist.“Thanks to the police, I was released and walked out of the police station with my feelings hurt and my body in pain. I continued with my story and it was published,” she said.From that moment she says, everyday became a day of running up and down trying to figure out what Ebola was and why it had come with so much force.“I started seeing people in my community dropping dead like flies. But there was no news about it and how our community had become a hot zone. Out of fear, I stayed clear of reporting Ebola activities in Caldwell and I think that’s how it spread so badly there,” she admitted.Within weeks, Yewa says she returned home one evening to find an Ebola task force spraying the house where she normally left her children.“When I tried asking for my children at their babysitter, they kept telling me to go home and how they were being quarantined.  I fainted. I immediately thought that I had someway or another brought Ebola into their home,” she thought.Hiding her situation from relatives, her work vicinity and telling people that she had allergies whenever she was seen crying, Yewa remembers it was a nightmare.“For a complete 21 days, my kids were stuck and so was I. I stood on the sidewalk near the house and watched people being taken away from where they spent their quarantined days. Some were already dead while some died in the various ETU’s,” she remembers.Again she says, she had to do her duty and publish her experience.“I wrote about what was happening to me by sharing parts of my dairy that I was writing as each horrible day passed on. I thank God my kids made it, but feel so bad that so many people that they knew lost their lives,” she added.Yewa says that her ambition heightened during the period her children were being quarantined. It inspired her to cover orphans and survivors of Ebola and remembers having to quarantine herself on numerous occasions.“Sometimes when I would go to cover situations and stories, I’d find myself being physically touched, stepping in vomit and forgetting the no touching rule,” she said.For instance, the late Shaki Kamara who was gunned down in the WestPoint community in August of 2014 is Yewa’s most memorable moment.“That day I ran to him while he lay bleeding on the ground and tried to console him. He begged me for help and water and asked me not to leave his side. I also had to help remind my counterparts to avoid stepping in the dying teens blood,” she recalled.“I was with him up until the next day when I went to redemption hospital and met his dead body on the ground in front of the hospital bed in which he had lain before his death. Unfortunately for me, I walked in on the Defense officials taking his body. I was able to get footage of the scenery but was apprehended by Defense Ministry Deputy for Operations, St. Jerome Larbelee. He took my camera and threatened to arrest me for being on the premises, all this happening while I watched with tears in my eyes the body of the late Shaki Kamara being taken away,” she added.Yewa’s camera was returned but she says not long afterwards, her safety and freedom were in jeopardy because of her findings.“I did a story on the situation of Shaki Kamara’s death up until his burial. It put a lot of pressure on me by people I can’t name, but it also taught me a strong lesson: Ebola.”Meanwhile, Yewa, since the Ebola outbreak, has not only saved lives but has made necessary links between survivors and orphans.“I have done nothing but put myself and my health on the line to help see to it that all the necessary information surrounding the outbreak got published. I only regret not being able to save the lives of some of those who I followed throughout it all,” she added.Now that the one year anniversary is just around the corner, it is appropriate that journalist like Yewa and other courageous women be highlighted. Leaving their families, safety and crossing boundaries to keep the public informed not only saved many lives, but it also shows what being courageous is all about.“I lost my cousin and uncle to Ebola, my kids are afraid to leave my side now and through it all I am still fighting the battle.Presently I sponsor orphans, check on survivors and also try my best to share my stories with the world so everyone can understand the mistakes that were made that caused so many people’s lives and how we have been battling it out while staying Ebola free,” she said.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Read more…

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Makes Some Noise

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (PhysOrg.com) — A group of physicists studying heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), a large particle accelerator located on Long Island, New York, recently showed that the collisions can create acoustic shock waves — sonic booms. This new information could be used to learn even more about the intriguing state of matter produced during the collisions. Explore further The matter, known as a quark-gluon plasma, is produced because the collisions are so energetic and hot that the ions’ constituent particles, quarks and gluons — known collectively as partons — which are normally tightly bound together, “melt” into a fluid-like particle soup.”What does a quark gluon plasma sound like? We wanted to find out,” said Duke University physicist Bryon Neufeld to PhysOrg.com, the paper’s corresponding author. “Sound waves are commonly used as a probe of everyday matter. But sound may also be a useful tool for researching matter at temperatures many thousands of times hotter than the sun.”Our work addresses the question of sound from a different perspective: What is the sound generated by highly energetic particles moving through the quark-gluon plasma, and how can we use it to explore the properties of the plasma?”Neufeld co-authored the paper on this research, appearing in the October 13 edition of Physical Review C, with physicists Berndt Mueller (Duke University) and Jorg Ruppert (McGill University, Montreal, Canada and J. W. Goethe-Universitat, Frankfurt, Germany).The group was looking for evidence of a Mach cone — the cone-shaped shock wave caused by the pressure difference created when an object, like an airplane or particle, exceeds the speed of sound in that particular medium (the speed of sound is different in different media).Said Neufeld, “Highly energetic particles traveling faster than the speed of sound may produce characteristic sound patterns, such as Mach cones, which create distinctive experimental signatures. These experimental signatures can help determine certain characteristics of the medium they are traveling through, such as the speed of sound and viscosity.”After the heavy-ion beams collide (in this case the beams consisted of either gold or lead nuclei), some partons back-scatter into the plasma rather than out of it. The physicists modeled the case of a single parton moving through the plasma, depositing energy and momentum in its wake. They took that model and used it to solve the hydrodynamic equations of the plasma. The solutions show that, mathematically, if the parton is moving faster than the speed of sound in the plasma a Mach cone trails behind it.Citation: Phys. Rev. C 78, 041901 (2008)Copyright 2008 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Citation: The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Makes Some Noise (2008, November 21) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-11-relativistic-heavy-ion-collider-noise.html New tool predicts how electrical stimulation promotes healing An aerial view of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, NY. Image: AIPlast_img read more

Read more…