Tag: 夜上海论坛VX

At 30-year anniversary of Syracuse’s first NCAA championship, former players reflect on historic campaign

first_imgThe 1983 Syracuse men’s lacrosse team had two uniforms: blue and white.Leading up to the ‘83 NCAA Division I Men’s Lacrosse Championship, the Orangemen were slated to wear their away blue uniforms against Johns Hopkins. But the team had other plans. Sophomore midfielder Brad Kotz, who was later named the tournament’s MVP, remembers the players urging coach Roy Simmons Jr. to implement a new color style.“We had never worn orange before that game,” Kotz said. “But we were the Orangemen, and it seemed only right to put on orange, like a tradition or something.”Simmons called to Syracuse to see if orange uniforms could be delivered to Rutgers. The team’s wish was granted and it was presented with new, orange jerseys prior to the game. The players thought they were upholding a tradition with the new shirts. In retrospect — 30 years and 11 national titles later — they were starting a far bigger one.Winning.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe Orangemen would go on to defeat Johns Hopkins 17-16 in the title game to capture the first national championship in school history. That 1983 squad is remembered for breaking ground. Members of the team recall their championship fondly, and know their role in catapulting SU into the national spotlight.“We had never experienced anything like that, not only as a team but as individuals,” then-sophomore defender Fred Cambria said. “It made us really start to appreciate the meaning of the word ‘team,’ because that is what that championship was all about.”It was like something out of a movie.Syracuse fell behind 12-5 in the middle of the third quarter and looked all but defeated. But then something clicked, something that none of the players will ever be able to explain.It started with Darren Lawlor’s goal late in the third quarter. Then Kotz and fellow sophomore Tim Nelson, both All-Americans, put the Orangemen onto their backs. Nelson poetically quarterbacked SU’s offense while Kotz started winning every faceoff and scoring at will. The result was eight straight goals that ended with an exclamation point.“When Randy Lundblad scored the goal that iced it I remember getting onto my knees and sliding at half field,” Nelson said. “I didn’t know what else to do, we shocked ourselves.”It wasn’t that the Orangemen weren’t used to winning. They were 13-1 on the season before beating Johns Hopkins, and the program was known for churning out competitive teams. But the team was also used to playing second fiddle to the national prominence of programs like Johns Hopkins and North Carolina.Heading into the 1983 championship game, Johns Hopkins had 39 championships, four in the NCAA. The Blue Jays were also celebrating the program’s 100th anniversary that season. Beating Johns Hopkins wasn’t just unlikely, it was unheard of.Still, the Orangemen’s determined upperclassmen weren’t going to let the past dictate the future.“We didn’t get the memo that we were supposed to lose that day,” then-senior defensive captain Jeff McCormick said. “Being a senior on a team with so much young talent wasn’t necessarily challenging. I just had to always let guys know that we could play with anyone, and I think we proved that.”Three decades later, Syracuse has become a perennial NCAA contender like the Johns Hopkins team that was supposed to derail its title hopes. The program now has 11 NCAA championships and 27 final four appearances, having become a destination for the nation’s top talent.“It’s not that we were angry being behind the Hopkins’ and UNC’s of the world, it’s just how it was,” said Derek Maltz Sr., a sophomore midfielder in 1983. “But what we did was huge. It allowed everyone to see what those inside the program knew all along. That Syracuse was one of the best lacrosse schools in the country, and is to this day.”The elder Maltz walked onto the team in 1982 and his son, Derek Maltz Jr., now starts for an SU team that will vie for the program’s 12th title Monday afternoon against Duke. Thirty years ago, Maltz and his teammates carved out a path. Now they watch as another generation attempts to walk down it.“To know that my son now has the opportunity to achieve the same thing I did is really special for me,” Maltz said. “Everyone deserves the feeling of winning a national championship. Everybody.”All of the members of the team have gone down different roads since a rare collection of ambition and talent brought them together on the biggest stage in college lacrosse.Cambria went into the entertainment business and won a National Sports Emmy for his work on the HBO sports documentary, “Assault in The Ring.” Kotz won two championships with the Philadelphia Wings of the National Lacrosse League after graduating from SU. He’s since settled down with his family outside of Washington D.C., owns a small business, and runs a lacrosse program that his two daughters play in. Maltz coordinates various defense agencies in the Washington D.C. area.Maltz, his former roommate Cambria, and Kotz met up in Philadelphia to watch SU’s 8-7 final four win over Denver on Friday. They’ll do so again for the title game on Monday.McCormick founded Saturn Partners in 1994 and was recently named the executive producer of the movie Crooked Arrows. He will be celebrating his wife’s birthday during SU’s championship quest, and will obtain updates any way he can.And then there’s Nelson, the team’s steady facilitator that refused to accept defeat. Nelson is currently the assistant vice president of advancement at Utica College, after serving as the men’s head lacrosse coach from 1999-05. He has been, and will continue to watch this year’s SU team from his couch.Regardless of where life has taken them since winning it all together, they all see this year’s team the same way.As the 2013 Orange head into a championship game of its own, they are predecessors to the success achieved 30 years ago, another symbolization of just how monumental that inaugural championship team was.“I won’t say we’re the best team in SU history, but we’ll always be the first,” Nelson said. “The fact that I’ll always be able to say that, well, that’s nice.” Comments Published on May 26, 2013 at 1:46 pm Contact Jesse: jcdoug01@syr.edu | @dougherty_jesse Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Read more…

Trojans rebound with key win over Long Beach State

first_imgTheir record now stands at 4-1 overall and 3-1 in conference play.The Trojans started the first set with five errors, giving Long Beach State a 4-0 lead. The Trojans rallied with blocks by junior outside hitters Cristian Rivera and Chris Lischke, followed by kills from Lischke, Rivera and sophomore outside hitter Alex Slaught to bring the game within two points.The 49ers, however, met USC’s rally with blocks and kills of their own, widening the team’s lead to 14-8. The Trojans rallied again, with four kills by freshman outside hitter Lucas Yoder thanks to three sets from junior setter Micah Christenson and one from senior libero Henry Cassiday.A kill from Rivera tied the game at 15 apiece and a block by Lischke gave the Trojans a 16-15 lead. Kills from Rivera and Slaught elevated the Trojans’ lead to 21-18. Two more blocks and a kill by Rivera set up Slaught for the game-winning kill, ending the first set in USC’s favor with a 25-19 win.Head coach Bill Ferguson acknowledged his team’s struggles in the opening set.“We weren’t executing our game plan as well as we could’ve,” Ferguson said. “We cleaned things up and we got it together and things went well for us.”The second set began evenly matched, the 49ers matching each point the Trojans scored. Kills by Yoder and Christenson kept Long Beach at bay with the game tied 10-10. Each side committed attacking and setting errors, keeping the score close.Kills from Yoder and Rivera gave the Trojans a three point lead, making the score 17-14. Kills by freshman middle blocker Andy Benesh, Yoder, Lischke and Slaught, as well as an ace from Benesh widened the Trojans’ lead, bringing the score to 23-19. After  a kill by Yoder set up game point for the Trojans. USC won 25-22 after a service error by Long Beach State ended the game.Ferguson was proud of his team’s play in the second set.“We continued to stay in our game plan,” the eighth-year coach said. “Our diggers and blockers did a great job of that. We were able to be agressive from the service line and limit their offense to two hitters.”In a must-win set for the 49ers, Long Beach quickly gained a 2-0 lead, though the Trojans were quick to close the gap and eventually gain a 5-4 lead thanks to two kills by Rivera with sets from Christenson.Errors by the Trojans kept the 49ers in the game, but kills by Rivera, Slaught and Benesh prevented Long Beach from ever gaining back its lead, keeping the score tied at eight.Due to errors committed by USC as well as key blocks by the 49ers, Long Beach was able to surge to a 14-13 lead. Despite two kills from Benesh and one from Slaught, Long Beach was able to hold off the Trojans, maintaining a 16-14 lead.Two kills by Yoder were undermined by his teammates’ mistakes, allowing Long Beach to keep its lead. Kills by Yoder and Rivera tied the game at 19, however, and an attack error by Long Beach gave USC a 20-19 lead.A service error by USC allowed Long Beach to tie the critical game at 22, followed by a kill to lift the 49ers over the Trojans, 23-22. Slaught matched a kill from Long Beach, tying the game at 24, which Yoder followed with a kill of his own, giving the Trojans a 25-24 advantage.Long Beach held off a Trojan win with kills of its own, and later tied the game at 31 apiece. Two consecutive kills by Yoder ended the third set, earning the Trojans a 33-31 victory over the 49ers.Ferguson was excited by his team’s strong play with the third set on the line.“We had great confidence and we remained aggressive,” he said. “Once we settled down on serving we were better. Our errors came from being aggressive.”Yoder led the team with 19 kills, followed closely by Rivera with 17. Christenson led the Trojans in assists and digs with 46 and 17, respectively.The pair’s play made an impact on their head coach.“Rivera was great,” Ferguson said. “He was really effective on the right side. Once he attacked well, that allowed Lucas to hit well.”The ability to bounce back from such a tough loss was the most significant part of the win for Ferguson.“We rely on our volleyball IQ and our overall ability,” the coach said. “Instead of creating opportunities to score and not executing, we had digs and converted them to kills to finish the deal.”The Trojans face Cal State Northridge on Friday at 7 p.m. in their second consecutive conference match on the road. Ferguson will make sure his team is prepared for a potential trap-game against the unranked Matadors.“Their style is different than Long Beach,” he said. “We will enjoy victory on the bus home, but back at USC we will focus. It is a great challenge and a great opportunity for us to play two different types of game plans.” Following Thursday’s home loss to Pepperdine, USC’s first loss of the season, the Trojans recovered with a three game sweep of Long Beach State on the road, winning 24-19, 25-22 and 33-31, respectively.Helping hand · Junior setter Micah Christenson had 46 assists and 17 digs in the Trojans’ straight set win over conference rival Long Beach State. – Joseph Chen | Daily Trojanlast_img read more

Read more…

New Boy, Onuachu Scores Nigeria’s Fastest Goal as Pharaohs Fall

first_imgDuro IkhazuagbeSuper Eagles new boy, Paul Onuachu scored world’s second fastest goal in football history yesterday as Nigeria defeated Pharaohs of Egypt 1-0 in an international friendly in Asaba . The victory is first for Nigeria against Egypt at international level since 1990.The full capacity fans at the Stephen Keshi Stadium were just settling into their seats when the Midtjyland of Denmark front man neatly controlled the pass from John Ogu, weaved past three Egyptian players to riffle home a fierce volley just eight seconds into the Grade A friendly.Only formerGerman international, Lukas Podoski’s sixth second strike againstEcuador in an international friendly in 2013 can rival Onuachu’s early goal in just his second game for Nigeria. The gangly lad made his debut for Eagles in last Friday’s last AFCON 2019 qualifier with Seychelles here in Asaba.Eagles were. clearly the better of the two teams despite the fact the seven-time African champions came to Asaba with a weakened team that was without their talismanic Mohamed Salah.Gernot Rohr wards took their performance beyond the insipid outing recorded against Seychelles four days ago.With what looked like a synergy happening between Onuachu, Alex Iwobi, Moses Simon and Henry Onyekuru upfront, the Pharaohs looked ordinary as the Nigerian forward ceaselessly took their defence apart.Eagles central defence manned by the ‘Oyinbo Wall’ of William Troost Ekong and Leon Balogun also combined well with the full backs of Shehu Abdullahi and another new boy Jamilu Collins. With this Daniel Akpeyi had no problems beyond a few incursion that were not really threats .Even when the Pharaohs had possession, they struggled to carve out openings as an experimental side failed to prove their worth, producing another lackluster performance following a 1-1 draw at Niger in a dead-rubber Nations Cup qualifier last Saturday which ended the team’s perfect run under new coach Javier Aguirre.The Mexican, who tasted his first defeat in charge of Egypt, gave debuts to Zamalek keeper Mahmoud Gennesh and central defender Mahmoud Alaa as well as Smouha left-back Ahmed Aboul-Fotouh and Dakhleya winger Islam Gaber.There were few familiar faces, including winger Mahmoud Trezeguet and Zamalek’s no-nonsense defensive midfielder Tarek Hamed.The visitors’ forwards were unable to make their presence felt until late in the game when Greek-based winger Amr Warda and striker Ahmed Kouka were introduced.The first meaningful effort fell to Kouka on 82 minutes when he was released by a through pass but he dithered on the ball to allow his challenger to make a sliding tackle and thwart his attempted shot.Gaber then created Egypt’s best chance, with his long-range thunderbolt drawing a fine save from Eagles substitute goalkeeper Ikechukwu Ezenwa. He also saved the follow up effort.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

Read more…