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Cricket News Kohli is greatest ODI batsman to have played the game: Clarke

first_img For all the Latest Sports News News, Cricket News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps. New Delhi: That Virat Kohli is destined to be among the pantheons of all-time greats is an oft-repeated assertion but for former Australia captain Michael Clarke, the India skipper is already the “greatest ODI batsman to have ever played the game”. Kohli, the world’s no.1 Test and ODI batsman, led India through a historic tour of Australia, during which the team won the Test and ODI rubbers and drew the T20 International series. Kohli’s India was the first team ever not to lose any series Down Under and along the way, he continued to add to his rapidly-rising count of international hundreds.“To me, Virat Kohli is the greatest batsman to have ever played one-day cricket. I have no doubts after seeing what he has achieved for India,” Clarke, himself a former World Cup-winning captain, told PTI in an interview. Kohli has already scored 10,385 runs in 219 ODIs with an astounding average of 59 plus, including 39 hundreds.An unabashed Kohli fan, Clarke said that the 30-year-old Indian’s passion is unmatchable. “You have to respect Virat’s passion to win games for his country. Yes, he has aggression but no one can question his commitment, how much he has achieved. He is the greatest in ODIs,” Clarke said.Also Read | Virat Kohli’s India in Australia: Five memorable moments from historic tourWhile Kohli’s craft continues to evoke awe, his predecessor Mahendra Singh Dhoni’s current form has the cricketing world divided.  Dhoni’s style of batsmanship in ODIs, no longer as aggressive as it used to be, has been a matter of concern but for Clarke, the 37-year-old former India captain should be left alone to play his game.“MS knows how to react to any given situation. He has played 300 plus ODIs so he knows how to go about his job,” Clarke said.But would Dhoni have been as effective as he was in the third ODI against Australia if the target would have been 330 instead of 230?“I think he would have played differently. It was 230 and he had a particular strategy and it would have been different if the target would have been bigger,” he said.“Look at his approach in the second game in Adelaide and the third game in Melbourne. It was different,” Clarke said.Asked what should be Dhoni’s batting position in the World Cup, Clarke said, “Any position 4, 5 or 6. He is good enough to bat at any position and I believe Virat will use him accordingly.”Clarke, however, made it clear that the currently suspended Hardik Pandya would play an important role for India going into the World Cup in England. Pandya faces, as of now, an uncertain future owing to his much-condemned sexist remarks on a TV show.“A talented player like Hardik is very necessary for the balance of the side. He can win games alone with his batting and I am confident he will be in that World Cup squad,” Clarke sounded confident. While he didn’t speak about the Pandya-KL Rahul controversy but Clarke looked at the bigger picture about professional sportspersons being role models.  He stressed on the aspect of “respect”.Asked if a lot of money is making youngsters go haywire in their conduct, Clarke gave his insight. “How much money you have earned is irrelevant because most important thing is to earn and give respect. I think it all starts with how you have been brought up.Also Read | Let Hardik Pandya, KL Rahul play while inquiry is on: BCCI president CK Khanna“Respecting every individual is very important. It starts with respecting elders regardless of profession,” Clarke, who has been a chip of the old bloc when it comes to traditions, said. But former batting mainstay also spoke about the need to not make one “mistake” the focus of somebody’s career.“Professional sportspersons are role models, recognized and they have a responsibility. Having said that, everyone makes mistakes and one needs to move on and learn from them,” said Clarke, who played 115 Tests and 245 ODIs for Australia.Asked if India are favourites to win the World Cup, Clarke said, “Certainly one of the favourites with the kind of bowling talent India have at the moment. The batting was always strong and they also have wonderful young spinners. What has impressed Clarke is the fact that India doesn’t have any “apparent weakness in the bowling department”.“Jasprit Bumrah is a skillful bowler who is improving every day. He continues to get better with his seam, swing, and pace. He is the best death bowler in ODI cricket at the moment,” said Clarke.However, the cricket analyst in him also feels that England will be a very difficult team to beat at home. “England is a very good ODI side and will be hard to beat at home. Also, I would like Australia to be in the mix. Australia will get better when the frontline pacers including Nathan Coulter Nile come back,” explained Clarke.Talking about Australian cricket, Clarke is hopeful that things will change for the better very soon if there is good leadership (not captaincy). “There is plenty of talent in Australian cricket. We have good young players playing Sheffield Shield. They still believe Test cricket is the pinnacle,” he said.  But he offered a word of caution too. A lot of hard work is needed and good leadership, which can select the right guys, back them and give them time to perform,” he said. last_img read more

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After Henry’s shocking death, Pace remembers, perseveres

first_imgTo see the effect Danroy ‘D.J.’ Henry had on a profound number of people, look no further than the 800 that crowded the Pace University gymnasium in his memory last Sunday. One by one, Henry’s friends and other Pace students told stories and anecdotes about how they remembered him best. ‘Danroy was very popular and had a lot of friends,’ said Joe O’Donnell, Pace’s athletic director. ‘I think the students that got up and said something were able to get some of the feelings they had out.’ Henry was shot and killed by two police officers Oct. 17 outside a bar in Thornwood, N.Y. His death occurred hours after Pace lost its Homecoming game to Stonehill College, a college coincidentally located in Henry’s hometown of Easton, Mass. Henry’s death has become a national story. There are highly conflicting accounts of the shooting from police and witnesses, and there are questions about whether proper medical attention was given to him after he was shot. Pace will take the field for its first game after Henry’s death this Saturday in a league matchup against University of New Haven. This is one of the first steps toward normalcy in what has been a hectic series of events for the Pace football team. Or as close to normal as it can get.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text O’Donnell said the team has taken steps to bring things back to the way they were. Last week’s game against Bentley College — which was supposed to be Homecoming in Waltham, Mass. — was cancelled. The players took Sunday and Monday off from practice after the death of their teammate and resumed practices Tuesday. O’Donnell said this was an effort to bring back the normalcy to which the team is accustomed. The last time Pace had to cancel a game was in the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. But O’Donnell doesn’t expect that normalcy to return soon. ‘There’s nothing in the makeup of college kids to handle something like this,’ he said. ‘Most people don’t experience the loss of a parent, brother or sister until later in life. To lose something like this, this is very dramatic.’ That Sunday night, a candlelight vigil was held on the football field. Immediately following the vigil, those students returned to the Pace gym to tell their stories. Stories of how Henry is remembered as a genuinely good-natured person. Pat Casey, a senior finance, accounting and entrepreneurship and emerging enterprises major at Syracuse, went to Oliver Ames High School in Easton, Mass., with Henry and played football with him for three years. When he first met Henry during their freshman year of high school, Henry was a much smaller person. After putting in time in the weight room year after year, Casey said he became fit and much more of an athlete. He said Henry always planned to play sports in college. A three-sport athlete at Oliver Ames, he constantly put in effort to succeed. After graduating from Oliver Ames in 2007, Henry did a post-graduate year to improve as a player and was recruited to play at Iona College. When Iona dropped its football program in 2008, Henry searched for a new team and found a home at Division II Pace, located in Westchester County. ‘He wasn’t insecure at all, he was comfortable in his own skin,’ Casey said. ‘He knew what he was capable of. He wanted to grow from that.’ Casey called him an inspiring figure. ‘He was one of those kids who really was working his a** off and really going hard, going out of his way to be nice to people,’ Casey said. ‘He showed appreciation for where he was in life.’ So Pace will show that same respect to its routine. For them, getting on the field each Saturday is normal. So at 1 p.m., when the game kicks off, some of that normal might return. That return to the field helped Connecticut after a similar tragedy occurred in Storrs last season. Almost a year to the day before Henry was killed, UConn cornerback Jasper Howard was stabbed and killed at an on-campus event following the Huskies’ win over Louisville. UConn took to the field to escape the pressures surrounding the situation. ‘The games and practices were really healthy because it let you think just about football and nothing else,’ said Connecticut Associate Director of Athletics/Communications Mike Enright. ‘It’s a place to escape, if you will.’ UConn scheduled practices and press conferences in the days following Howard’s death at the same time they had always been scheduled. It wasn’t normal, but it was consistent. It helped to keep the team together. The team also emphasized the attitude of playing the remaining games the way Howard ‘would have wanted them to play football,’ Enright said. That is a sentiment that also holds true for the Setters. ‘The attitude is there. It’s a good attitude,’ O’Donnell said. ‘They want to play this for D.J., which will be normal. … We try not to get too emotional.’ After discussing with his captains, head coach Chris Dapolito thought this was the best move for the team. ‘We’ve talked to everyone, we’ve talked to the faculty,’ O’Donnell said. ‘The faculty has been absolutely wonderful in the ways they’ve tried to help the student-athletes get back to normalcy. If there is a normalcy after this.’ knmciner@syr.edu Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on October 27, 2010 at 12:00 pmcenter_img Commentslast_img read more

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Purple & Bold: Michael Jordan and LeBron James? It’s complicated

first_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersFor the first time, there was a definitive window into how LeBron, who has detailed in so many ways how he wished “to be like Mike” growing up in poverty in Akron, Ohio, has watched the documentary series and how old memories of Jordan have resurfaced. On Monday on “WRTS: After Party,” a show produced by his media company Uninterrupted, he dove into how he viewed Jordan as “Black Jesus,” a man who seemed like a god who lived in his television until he met him at 16 years old, watching him and Antoine Walker talk trash in a gym together. He imagined how his Redeem Team would fare against the classic 1992 Dream Team. At one point, he envisioned himself playing alongside Jordan in place of Scottie Pippen, saying it “would have been a whole ‘nother level.”But the other side – the more nuanced, more complicated one – came out, too. After ESPN’s Brian Windhorst wrote that James liked to imagine Jordan as a teammate rather than an adversary, LeBron tried to scrub the record. It’s not surprising that James, whose critics assail him for forming the Heatles in Miami in 2010 rather than following Jordan’s one-franchise path (oh, how quickly we forget those Wizard seasons), would be sensitive about people saying he’d rather join his Airness than challenge him. For as much as LeBron is willing to reminisce about how he idolized Jordan, this is still a competition: He doesn’t wish to live exclusively in Michael’s shadow.It’s a complicated relationship. James has said many times that Jordan was one of his most powerful male role models in his single-parent household as a child. He’s called Jordan his “inspiration,” and on the podcast, he detailed how devastating it was when Jordan retired the first time, leaving a 9-year-old James in tears.But by many accounts, the two men are not close. Perhaps meeting our idols is never quite what we hope. Jordan’s emotional tribute to Kobe Bryant in February, in once sense, underscores that he has a far less intimate relationship with James. Beyond competing legacies on the court, they also are somewhat competitors off it, given that the Jordan Brand is its own offshoot of Nike. James has aspirations of one day owning an NBA team as Jordan does. This is not to say LeBron doesn’t appreciate Jordan, or give him credit. On the show, LeBron and business associate Maverick Carter acknowledged there would be no LeBron without Michael. They noted that without Jordan’s relationship with Nike, LeBron wouldn’t have reaped his marketing platform. Without the Dream Team, basketball probably wouldn’t have launched LeBron into the global stardom he enjoys today.But there is some behind-the-scenes manuevering and posturing that feels a little frosty. ESPN reported that Jordan agreed to the documentary on the day James and the Cleveland Cavaliers were parading through Cleveland after the 2016 Finals. Perhaps this is coincidence.It’s also worth remembering that LeBron, though he often shies from comparing himself to Jordan in public forums, has self-declared as the best player of all time. Even though Jordan is famously reclusive and barely appears for public events anymore, that surely got back to his ears. It’s interesting how recency bias can help debates like this one ebb and flow: Jordan unleashing a 10-part series with ESPN, over which he had a great deal of control, has injected a fresh perspective on his legacy (albeit with maybe a little airbrushing over the bullying of his own teammates).The fact that the documentary comes in the vacuum of the NBA hiatus means Jordan has given himself a platform to celebrate his career while James’ own has stalled for forces beyond his control. James has come around slowly to engaging “The Last Dance” on social media. On the debut weekend, James didn’t post about the show on his Twitter or Instagram page – which seemed odd since he himself suggested back in March he hoped ESPN would release earlier than originally planned. He did manage to tweet about “The Wall,” a game show produced by one of his media companies.As the weeks went on, LeBron warmed up: posting about the emotion when he watched Jordan win his first title, then recalling how he cried when Jordan first retired. And by the end, he was engaged enough to film a 48-minute show around “The Last Dance,” and was pretty game to talk a lot about his childlike awe for the man he viewed as a real-life superhero.That doesn’t change the fact that two competitive men are surely being protective of their legacies, hoping to stake their individual claims as the greatest. There was one particular goosebumps moment of James’ reaction to show he reflected on how Jordan retired at the top of his game in 1998.“He’s nowhere near being on his last legs,” James said with wide eyes. “This (expletive) can still go. He’s still the best player in the world. And I’m watching that in ‘98 at 14 years of age, and I’m like, ‘Wow, Mike’s still the best player in the world at 35 years old.’”LeBron, age 35, is now forced away from the game while some still believe he’s the best player in the world. And after five weeks of watching Michael at his greatest, that has to sting.— Kyle GoonThese links are still open for businessAn opening for pro sports in California? – Gov. Gavin Newsom seemed to make some encouraging suggestions about pro sports in June (albeit without fans).Facilities open – The Lakers and Clippers have both tentatively opened facilities for individual workouts.No substances involved in helicopter crash – An autopsy report shows no signs of drugs or alcohol in the pilot who flew Kobe and Gigi Bryant in the fatal crash.The full ‘Last Dance’ reaction from LeBron – If you’re interested in viewing the 48-minute show, tune in to see what LeBron had to say about Michael.Dwight Howard dealing with grief – The mother of one of his children died during the quarantine, offering tough perspective for Howard and his family.Mamba out – The Sports Academy in Thousand Oaks is changing its name, removing “Mamba” from the title.Follow our COVID-19 news coverage – The latest on local cases and procedures to limit the pandemic.center_img Editor’s note: This is the Tuesday, May 19 edition of the Purple & Bold Lakers newsletter. To receive the newsletter in your inbox, sign up here.Michael vs. LeBron? Let’s not kick the dead horse.Perhaps the most popular, most heated and most exhausted debate in basketball is getting microwaved again by “The Last Dance,” which finished airing on ESPN on Sunday with episodes nine and ten. But rather than trodding upon ground that’s already well covered, I find myself wondering:What must it be like for LeBron to have watched this documentary in an extraordinary moment like this?last_img read more

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