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Colombian Navy launches first domestically manufactured vessel

first_img Other Navy ships built in Colombia “What we have today with this ship, which is 100 percent designed, manufactured and built in Colombia, is the dream of many people who put their hearts, hands, minds and efforts to transform steel into monuments for the homeland, peace, development and security,” said Pinzon. Thanks to the construction of these and other vessels, the Colombian naval industry is respected throughout the world by countries which purchase vessels manufactured in the country. The main mission of the Punta Espada will be to carry out maritime interdiction, patrol and surveillance operations in Colombian waters. Security forces will use it to detect, intercept, and inspect suspicious vessels. . “At the tactical and operational level, Colombia has responded to a number of needs that conflict and drug trafficking have been creating,” said Néstor Alfonso Rosania, a security analyst at the Center for Studies in Security, Defense and International Affairs of Colombia. The Armed Forces of Colombia will continue to receive the best available equipment and technological tools “because they are the ones who have put Colombia on a path towards peace,” the defense minister said. Defense Minister Juan Carlos Pinzón, and the commander of the National Navy, Admiral Hernando Wills, presided over the launching ceremony of the Punta Espada in Cartagena. “Colombia has entered a select group of countries that have the technology and knowledge to build these kind of vessels,” said Rear Adm. Roberto Sáchica, the president of Cotecmar. The ARC Punta Espada – the first CPV produced entirely in Colombia – touched water for the first time October 31. It was produced by the Science and Technology Corporation of Naval, Maritime and Riverine Industry Development (Cotecmar) in conjunction with the Social and Enterprise Defense Group (GSED), which is part of the Defense Ministry. By Dialogo November 28, 2014 “The coastal patrol boat responds to needs from armed conflict and transnational drug trafficking It will provide the Navy with more mobility and achievements in operations against threats facing the country. This boat is not only fundamental to Colombia’s Navy, but it is also important to the Colombian military industry at the international level.” “It is a great start that this patrol boat is already sailing,” Rosania said. “This boat is the result of scientific and technological development that the Colombian government has been implementing in recent years. The Navy understands the need to build vessels to monitor both oceans and prevent drug trafficking from continuing in these areas. Authorities are concentrating their efforts on developing new technologies to combat threats of transnational crime and various related offenses.” “What we have today with this ship, which is 100 percent designed, manufactured and built in Colombia, is the dream of many people who put their hearts, hands, minds and efforts to transform steel into monuments for the homeland, peace, development and security,” said Pinzon. The Colombian military industry has built other Navy vessels. For example, in February the Colombian Navy launched the ARC 20 de Julio, the largest ship built in the country. It was designed and built by Cotecmar. For example, in September 2012, Brazil bought four LPR-40 patrol boats which were manufactured in Cartagena. It is important and interesting that countries like Peru and Colombia are becoming more technical with respect to the Navy. I read about ESMERALDA, a Chilean sailing vessel in AGORA, which until now was the largest, but according to what I read now it will be the UNION. Congratulations to both governments for their interest in becoming one of the big players in this area. Your information is very timely. I work in the National Port Security Commission in Honduras as head of Port Security Audits (APIP in Spanish)… I hope you continue to contribute with more information. “I congratulate everyone who has contributed to these projects, which were no simple feat,” Pinzon said. “These are projects that carry the vision of great people of this country, officers, non-commissioned officers, engineers, sailors and good Colombians, who have visualized Colombia’s real and strategic capacity in naval and maritime matters for several years.” “It is a great start that this patrol boat is already sailing,” Rosania said. “This boat is the result of scientific and technological development that the Colombian government has been implementing in recent years. The Navy understands the need to build vessels to monitor both oceans and prevent drug trafficking from continuing in these areas. Authorities are concentrating their efforts on developing new technologies to combat threats of transnational crime and various related offenses.” The main mission of the Punta Espada will be to carry out maritime interdiction, patrol and surveillance operations in Colombian waters. Security forces will use it to detect, intercept, and inspect suspicious vessels. . The ARC Punta Espada – the first CPV produced entirely in Colombia – touched water for the first time October 31. It was produced by the Science and Technology Corporation of Naval, Maritime and Riverine Industry Development (Cotecmar) in conjunction with the Social and Enterprise Defense Group (GSED), which is part of the Defense Ministry. Other Navy ships built in Colombia Thanks to the construction of these and other vessels, the Colombian naval industry is respected throughout the world by countries which purchase vessels manufactured in the country. “At the tactical and operational level, Colombia has responded to a number of needs that conflict and drug trafficking have been creating,” said Néstor Alfonso Rosania, a security analyst at the Center for Studies in Security, Defense and International Affairs of Colombia. “The coastal patrol boat responds to needs from armed conflict and transnational drug trafficking It will provide the Navy with more mobility and achievements in operations against threats facing the country. This boat is not only fundamental to Colombia’s Navy, but it is also important to the Colombian military industry at the international level.” Improving Colombia’s strategic capacity The Punta Espada will help the Armed Forces continue on that path. Military officials appointed Naval Lt. Cmdr. Henry Mauricio Barón Franco as the patrol boat’s commander. He will take command of a vessel that measures 45.25 meters in length, 7.1 meters in beam and 1.84 meters in draught. It can accommodate a crew of 23 people, and is powered by two diesel engines which drive a fixed pitched propeller. It’s also outfitted with a 25-mm caliber cannon and two 60-mm caliber machine guns. Colombia’s security forces recently obtained an important tool in their fight against international drug trafficking – a coastal patrol vessel (CPV). Improving Colombia’s strategic capacity Colombian manufacturers used global technology to build the patrol boat, which has the capability of refueling rapid response boats. The Punta Espada will help the Armed Forces continue on that path. Military officials appointed Naval Lt. Cmdr. Henry Mauricio Barón Franco as the patrol boat’s commander. He will take command of a vessel that measures 45.25 meters in length, 7.1 meters in beam and 1.84 meters in draught. It can accommodate a crew of 23 people, and is powered by two diesel engines which drive a fixed pitched propeller. It’s also outfitted with a 25-mm caliber cannon and two 60-mm caliber machine guns. “Colombia has entered a select group of countries that have the technology and knowledge to build these kind of vessels,” said Rear Adm. Roberto Sáchica, the president of Cotecmar. The Armed Forces of Colombia will continue to receive the best available equipment and technological tools “because they are the ones who have put Colombia on a path towards peace,” the defense minister said. Defense Minister Juan Carlos Pinzón, and the commander of the National Navy, Admiral Hernando Wills, presided over the launching ceremony of the Punta Espada in Cartagena. The Colombian military industry has built other Navy vessels. For example, in February the Colombian Navy launched the ARC 20 de Julio, the largest ship built in the country. It was designed and built by Cotecmar. Colombia’s security forces recently obtained an important tool in their fight against international drug trafficking – a coastal patrol vessel (CPV). “I congratulate everyone who has contributed to these projects, which were no simple feat,” Pinzon said. “These are projects that carry the vision of great people of this country, officers, non-commissioned officers, engineers, sailors and good Colombians, who have visualized Colombia’s real and strategic capacity in naval and maritime matters for several years.” For example, in September 2012, Brazil bought four LPR-40 patrol boats which were manufactured in Cartagena. Colombian manufacturers used global technology to build the patrol boat, which has the capability of refueling rapid response boats. last_img read more

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Can USG combat USC’s mental health stigma?

first_imgFew counselors. Hour-long wait times. General feelings of neglect. Before this year, USC was a campus without a strong culture of mental health awareness. But things might be changing now.In the past couple of months, the Undergraduate Student Government has led a campaign to break down the stigma of mental health across multiple fronts, from an initiative to create a fall semester break to plans for exposing freshmen to mental health awareness programs during orientation. USG President Rini Sampath, one of the biggest supporters of this issue, stated that she had been motivated by the many stories of students on the “brink of some very unfortunate things.”“College is a very difficult place,” Sampath said. “Everyone has [difficulties with] mental health, but there are people who will have mental illness. There is a wide variety and range of what people go through and I think it’s about figuring out how we can help each other out.”Sampath pointed out how, in an effort to counter these statistics, she and USG Director of Wellness Affairs Christine Hasrouni successfully lobbied for the addition of six new counselors at the Engemann Student Health Center a few months ago.“We brought [the issue] to President Nikias, we brought it to Student Affairs, and we said that students are unable to go see counselors because there is a seven-week wait,” Sampath said. “We should be acting proactively instead of reactively to these problems.”Sampath mentioned that one of USG’s current actions is implementing a survey to identify students’ main health concerns.Despite these initiatives, Sampath argued that USG’s main tool in terms of advocacy is passing resolutions, but that ultimately the administration has to implement these policies.“It’s us laying the foundation, but it’s up to the administration if they want to construct the building,” Sampath said. “We’ve had some successes, like our drop deadline [and] Leavey Library renovations, but overall we are looking for support in other topics that might be harder to talk about, like mental health.”Javanne Golob, a staff social worker at the counseling center, said that despite the short amount of time since USG began its initiative, some positive results are already visible.“[USG mental health promotion] is just beginning now,” Golob said. “But I’ve had clients of mine mention that they’ve seen the events or it’s made mental health more a conversation topic on campus, so hopefully it’s starting the conversation and reducing the stigma.”Golob said USG and other student assemblies are succeeding in popularizing the topic of mental health, making it more “campuswide” and not just something “sequestered in the corner” at the Engemann Center. Golob argued that student organizations have the advantage of going beyond the services available at the Engemann Center, and exploring mental health solutions apart from counseling. She also pointed out how USG is promoting self care habits, such as exercise, eating well, connecting socially, sleeping and seeking peer-to-peer support, which can help prevent individual crises.“[The Engemann Center’s Interim Assistant Director of Outreach Services  Dr. Kelly Greco and I] work with USG and a lot of the great student groups to formulate events for the  next coming months so that people can notice the signs of a mental health issue coming up before it turns into a crisis,” Golob said. “So we’re trying. We are a little engine.”On the programming side, this October and November USG’s  Academic Culture Assembly has come to the forefront with its 2015 Mental Health Awareness Month, also known as “Behind the Mask.” Running from Oct. 12 to Nov. 20, Behind the Mask consists of 20 events, many of which are in collaboration with other student assemblies, such as the Black Student Assembly and the Women’s Student Assembly. The events are varied, taking the form of film screenings, student panels, exhibits, karaoke, yoga and even a puppy petting session.Gisella Tan, executive director of the International Student Assembly and one of the month’s organizers, explained that de-stressing workshops are valuable in removing the “stigma” in some cultures that might have different approaches to mental health. She explained that the defunding of certain centers does not help their cause.“I don’t think I can speak for all international students, but our resource center, the Office of International Services, has been severely defunded,” Tan said. “So if you need counseling services, you may have to wait a couple of days. And the counseling services that they offer have been greatly minimized.”But Tan also stated that events such as the de-stressing workshop are not truly effective in generating immediate results.“[These types of events] are more on the symbolic side,” Tan said. “I don’t think that an hour-long event or even a 20 minute yoga would actually help students successfully to de-stress.”She added that these events are more of an opportunity to raise awareness by letting students know about the health services available and fostering self-care.Krystal Chavez, who works in cultural affairs for the Latina/o Student Assembly, also holds awareness to be one of the main goals of Behind the Mask.“What most people don’t realize is that programming events are essentially advocating for things. Without a goal in mind, the event won’t happen,” Chavez said. “We were advocating to the idea that the administration wasn’t doing what they needed to do in helping students.”This advocacy has had positive results on some students. After one discussion, Eesen Sivapalan, a junior majoring in business administration and accounting who attended the event,  praised USG’s efforts.“Not just for the Latino community, but for any minority community on campus, events like these really open up discussion for topics which we wouldn’t normally discuss at home and even amongst our group of friends,” Sivapalan said. “I feel that when it comes to minority groups, things like mental health are topics that are considered taboo in the family, and so because of that, it’s not uncommon for there to be more minority members suffering from mental health issues.”Sivapalan held that progress was definitely being made in raising awareness, and that later generations would have even easier access to the mental health conversation due to a “shrinking” cultural gap.And due to the lack of promotion for health services, Sivapalan said that he is “happy” that USG is helping the student body in ways the administration does not.“The University can do a better job in helping promote the mental health of students,” Sivapalan said. “We have a wait time of seven weeks for us to get an appointment with the counselor, and I feel that that just isn’t fair when we’re paying so much money for tuition.”In fact, Sivapalan mentioned that without USG’s wellness promotion, his opinion on mental health services would have been different.“One student pointed out that you can only get to know what’s going on in your mind when you have a facilitator guide you through your own thought process,” Sivapalan said. “The reason why I want to have an appointment with the counselors is only because of this event and the comments in the discussion here. I think events such as these are an essential part of our student experience.”Now, USG’s biggest concern is what members characterize as an unspoken administrative indifference. Students active in combatting this issue know that their efforts pale against those the University could take.Sampath, for example, explained that USC and USG have made huge strides in terms of mental health awareness in comparison to other campuses. However, she also said that USG at best can raise awareness, create dialogue and start conversations, but it cannot dictate policy.“What we can do as Undergraduate Student Government is be the voice for the students and say, ‘This needs to be taken care of,’” Sampath said. “Because, otherwise, what’s going to happen? This is just going to get brushed under the rug.”last_img read more

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Province enters into agreement with Nexen for LNG facility land

first_imgIn February, the Province put out a request for an expression of interest to build at Grassy Point near Prince Rupert.  The request attracted four suitable submissions.  The agreement between Nexen and the Province gives Nexen the exclusive right to move forward with the planning necessary to build an LNG export infrastructure at Grassy Point. Discussions are reportedly ongoing with the remaining three proponents for an adjacent parcel of land. Nexen will now have to seek regulatory approval, an export permit from the National Energy Board and decide with its partners if the project will move forward. – Advertisement -There are now 10 LNG project proposals for British Columbia.last_img read more

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