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Lysianne Proulx, Syracuse goalkeeper, out for the season with hip injury

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on October 9, 2018 at 5:44 pm Contact David: ddschnei@syr.edu Goalkeeper Lysianne Proulx is out for the season with a left hip injury, Syracuse head coach Phil Wheddon announced Tuesday.Immediately after the halftime whistle was blown during Syracuse’s 6-3 loss to No. 23 North Carolina State on Thursday, Proulx went to the ground and received medical attention. Less than five minutes later, she walked off the field under her own power. She was seen standing on the sidelines without assistance during the second half.Proulx was seen using crutches at SU Soccer Stadium on Sunday after the Orange’s 7-1 loss to No. 3 North Carolina, and again on Tuesday during practice.Proulx, a sophomore, made four starts and five appearances off the bench in 2018. The Montreal, Quebec native has averaged 2.98 goals allowed per game, while Jordan Harris, her competition, has conceded an average of 2.39 goals per game.Since playing all 90 minutes in SU’s first three games, Harris has split time with Proulx. Harris and freshman Ally Wakeman will compete for the starting goalkeeper position over the final four games of the season, Wheddon said.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textcenter_img Commentslast_img read more

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In a rare case of river piracy climate change is the culprit

first_imgScientists say they can pinpoint a day in May of 2016 when the water levels in the Slims River dramatically dropped. (Photo by Dan Shugar/University of Washington Tacoma)Scientists are pointing to climate change as the reason a river that used to feed into the Yukon has nearly disappeared.Listen nowA report published in Nature Geoscience on Monday said it’s the first documented case of river piracy in modern times — linked to the planet heating up. River piracy is when one river steals the flow of another.Scientists knew the Kaskawulsh Glacier in northern Canada was shrinking. But they didn’t expect it to cause a nearby lake to almost vanish. At least, not so quickly.“Nobody’s documented this as basically occurring under our noses,” Shugar said.Dan Shugar researches how landforms evolve at the University of Washington in Tacoma. Last fall, he set out with his colleagues to study the Slims River. It’s fed by a series of ponds at the front of the Kaskawulsh Glacier.When he arrived, Shugar said he expected the river’s current to be low.“But as it turned out is was essentially no flow,” Shugar said. “So we couldn’t actually put our instruments in the water it was so shallow.”Shugar didn’t spend the remainder of his time in Canada kicking back. His new mission became figuring out what happened to the Slims River.The body of water used to flow into the Kluane Lake and eventually into the Yukon River, which empties into the Bering Sea. But because of glacier melt, that water redirected.“The Kaskawulsh River essentially stole all of that water that would have otherwise flowed into the Slims River,” Shugar said. “So it pirated that flow. It captured that flow.”Now that water goes from the Kaskawulsh River to the Alsek River and all the way to the Gulf  of Alaska.Shugar said, due to the circumstances, this particular situation is unique. Still, the rapid pace at which it occurred serves as an important reminder.“Climate change is happening and it’s happening here,” Shugar said. “So we need to be keeping in mind that we may get thrown a few curve balls moving forward.”So while the Kaskawulsh River was the pirate, Shugar said human-caused climate change is ultimately to blame.last_img read more

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