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HMDA, hmmm? Reporting data points as “not applicable”

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Like many of you, I have been busy, busy, busy attending NAFCU’s Virtual Regulatory Compliance School. The virtual experience was new for me (and I bet most of you), but the conference was a great success. I learned so many new things, but studying to be an NCCO is no easy task. However, after many long evenings of studying, I get to update my signature line to: Janice Ringler, NCCO!Congratulations and welcome to all the new NCCOs!On July 28, 2020, CFPB released its fourth update to its HMDA FAQs, updating question #7 in the Ethnicity, Race, and Sex section, and questions #1 and #2 in the Multiple Data Points section. The FAQ’s attempt to clarify when combined loan-to-value (CLTV), debt-to-income ratio (DTI), income, and property value needs to be reported on the LAR.  The FAQs state that all of these fields must be reported “if they were a factor relied on in making a credit decision—even if the data was not the dispositive factor.” The FAQs set a “relied on” standard to determine when the credit union must report the data for income, credit score, DTI, CLTV, and property value. However, Regulation C allows credit unions to report these data points, along with credit score and credit score model, as “not applicable.” A frequent question we get from credit unions is:If these data points must be reported if they are “relied on in making a credit decision”, in what instances would these fields be reported as “not applicable?” I have explored some possible scenarios below. continue reading »last_img read more

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Instant self-test HIV kit launches in Britain

first_imgBritain’s first legally-approved HIV self-testing kit went on sale online on Monday, promising a result in just 15 minutes with a 99.7 percent accuracy rate.Developers hope the BioSure HIV Self Test will help identify the estimated 26,000 people in Britain who have HIV but do not yet know.“Knowing your HIV status is critical and the launch of this product will empower people to discreetly test themselves when it is convenient to them and in a place where they feel comfortable,” explained BioSure founder Brigette Bard.Early diagnosis reduces the risk of passing the disease on to other people and also raises the success rate of modern treatments, which now make the disease manageable.“Over 40 percent of people living with HIV are diagnosed late, meaning they have been living with HIV for at least four years,” said Deborah Gold, chief executive of the National Aids Trust (NAT).“People diagnosed late are 11 times more likely to die in the first year after diagnosis,” she added.The kit reacts to antibodies — proteins made in response to the virus — in a drop of the person’s blood, producing two purple lines in the event of a positive diagnosis.The self-test, which is only available via the Internet, can only detect antibodies three months after the patient has become infected, and is not effective during this initial period, and all positive results must be confirmed by professional health workers, experts said.Rosemary Gillespie, chief executive at HIV charity Terrence Higgins Trust, said it was “great to see the first self-test kits being approved.“However, it is important to make sure people can get quick access to support when they get their result.”Currently, those who fear they may have been infected have to collect a blood sample at home and send it to a laboratory, waiting five days for the result.There are almost 110,000 people in Britain living with HIV, which can lead to AIDS if the sufferer’s immune system becomes badly damaged.A similar test in the US has been available since 2012, giving a result in around 30 minutes from a sample of the person’s saliva or blood.–AFPRelated Bountiful harvest makes Zimbabwe self-sufficient Zimbabwe launches HIV/AIDS treatment manualcenter_img Uganda to introduce oral HIV self-test kitlast_img read more

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Referee admits error in Italy vs Brazil Confed Cup match

first_imgFIFA says the referee who awarded Italy a goal after first whistling for a penalty in Saturday’s match against Brazil acknowledges making the wrong call.Referee Ravshan Irmatov blew his whistle to award Italy a penalty. Moments later, as play continued, Giorgio Chiellini scored. Irmatov was seen pointing at the penalty spot and then giving a goal.FIFA spokesman Pekka Odriozola said: “He has admitted he made a mistake.”Irmatov is a widely respected referee from Uzbekistan who had been expected to have a chance to referee the Confederations Cup final. Now he is expected to be sent home with his assistants, who also made two key errors in Saturday’s game.Brazil won the match 4-2.last_img read more

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