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Lyme Disease warning signs to be erected in Letterkenny-Milford area

first_imgCouncillors of the Letterkenny-Milford area have passed a motion calling for signs to alert the public to the dangers of contracting Lyme Disease from ticks.The council will work with the National Parks and Wildlife Service to explore options for placing signage at Glenveagh National Park and local woodlands.The signs are expected to be proposed countywide after Letterkenny-Milford Municipal District Mayor John O’Donnell raised the matter with the local authority on Tuesday. Cllr O’Donnell said that many local Lyme Disease sufferers brought the issue to his attention.Lyme disease is a debilitating bacterial infection that is spread to humans by infected ticks. Not every tick carries Lyme, but it is estimated that 6-10% of the insects are carriers.Cllr O’Donnell said that awareness of the illness is growing as more people get diagnosed. However, those who can afford to Germany for specific diagnoses are facing significant challenges as their results are often not recognised by Irish doctors.Cllr O’Donnell welcomed the response from the council as they plan to contact the National Parks and Wildlife Service under the Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht.  Small area of Donegal seeing high incidence of Lyme Disease, says expertLyme Disease warning signs to be erected in Letterkenny-Milford area was last modified: September 12th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Cllr John O’Donnellletterkenny-milford municipal districtLyme Diseasetickslast_img read more

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NaGeira’s Treasure – GC6EDE – GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – November 22, 2012

first_img SharePrint Related”Pirate’s Booty/Bonaire” GC19NBJ GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – October 24, 2011October 24, 2011In “Community”Geocache of the Week — Pirates of the Grand: The Legend of DKs TreasureAugust 3, 2017In “Community”Arrrrrrr you fan of Pirates? — Nashuan’s First Cache (GC1D56C) — Geocache of the WeekAugust 28, 2013In “Community” Share with your Friends:More Your adventure awaitsCoordinates to this kid-friendly geocache deliver you to a remote island off eastern Canada. Your thirst for adventure leads you to a mysterious door. The passage is carved into a sheer cliff. The salty sea air heightens your awareness. You’re near a hidden pirate treasure. The deserted beach, on a rocky shore will reveal a secret if you can only follow the clues.A pirate’s treasureNaGeira’s Treasure (GC6EDE) was hidden by Alastair Allan (aviex) & Sherilyn Beaton. It’s rested in a moss covered cove for ten years. The cache owners described the cache as, “an adventure for the kids and an interesting afternoon.”They weave a pirates tale with the cache description. “NaGeira’s treasure was wrested from the dastardly pirate Peter Easton by the people of Conception Bay and hidden underground on the Treasure Island. A recently discovered parchment… appears to give directions to the hiding place.”In search of treasureNearly 150 geocaching teams logged smileys on this cache since it was hidden July of 2002. The difficulty 2.5, terrain 3 traditional cache in Newfoundland and Labrador has accumulated more than 20 Favorite Points. Geocachers who find the cache say, “Well isn’t this what caching is all about! Seeking treasure in a memorable location that makes you almost forget what you planned to do for the rest of the day. That was certainly our experience: a lunch on the beach and exploring for the rest of the afternoon. Truly one of of our all-time favourites. The stuff ‘caching memories’ are made of ”Getting closer…Continue to explore some of the most engaging geocaches around the globe. Check out all the Geocaches of the Week on the Latitude 47 blog or view the Bookmark List on Geocaching.com.If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, send an email with your name, comments, the name of the geocache, and the GC code to pr@groundspeak.com.last_img read more

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Visualizing a World of Facebook Connections

first_imgGuide to Performing Bulk Email Verification Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… audrey watters A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Audit Tags:#Facebook#web center_img The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos Related Posts How do you visualize Facebook? As Facebook engineering intern Paul Butler notes, when you have a social graph of 500 million people, there are numerous ways in which you can view the data. For his part, Butler has been interested in visualizing how our friendships are connected to geographic place. So he has created a visualization based on cities and the number of Facebook friendships between them. Using the open source statistical tool R, Butler has taken data from a sample of aboutu 10 million friendship pairs, plotted them to location, and counted the number of friends between pairs of cities. Here’s part of Butler’s explanation:“I defined weights for each pair of cities as a function of the Euclidean distance between them and the number of friends between them. Then I plotted lines between the pairs by weight, so that pairs of cities with the most friendships between them were drawn on top of the others. I used a color ramp from black to blue to white, with each line’s color depending on its weight. I also transformed some of the lines to wrap around the image, rather than spanning more than halfway around the world.”Butler says that when he shared the image with others at Facebook, “it resonated with many people. It’s not just a pretty picture, it’s a reaffirmation of the impact we have in connecting people, even across oceans and borders.” Indeed, it is a very powerful visualization of our world.(You can find a high resolution image here.)last_img read more

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Oases of Green Thinking in New Mexico

first_imgA homes tour in the Santa Fe area features properties certified under Build Green New Mexico and LEED for HomesThe Annual GreenBuilt Tour, now in its tenth year, features 25 homes in Albuquerque, Santa Fe, Taos, and surrounding areas. Scheduled for May 16 and 17, the tour is a good opportunity to inspect properties that not only earned Build Green New Mexico or LEED for Homes certification when they were completed, but have put their green amenities to the test over time.In other words, these homes are green theory, ingenuity, and materials hard at work.One of the stars of the tour, highlighted recently in the Santa Fe New Mexican, is a home completed in November 2007 in West Basin, a 944-acre conservation community of five homesites on the southwest edge of the Galisteo Basin Preserve.The preserve, a 13,522-acre development and conservation project operated by the nonprofit Commonweal Conservancy, includes other housing projects, one with 20 homesites and another, 300-acre site with 950 homes and mixed-used construction. The development projects are intended to help pay for the Commonweal’s purchase of the remaining 12,000, which will remain publicly accessible open space.The home at West Basin was the first preserve residence to be completed in the preserve, the New Mexican story notes, and it is among the most efficient, operating off the grid by virtue of its 33 PV panels and a 5.1 kW battery installation, as well as walls made with rammed earth and autoclaved aerated concrete blocks.The home includes windows made from fast-growing lyptus wood and vigas rafters harvested from standing dead timber. The building also is equipped with water-efficient appliances and fixtures, a water-permeable driveway to prevent runoff and erosion, and features a deep butterfly roof that channels rainwater into storage tanks.The owners worked with Signer Harris Architects, of Boston, and WoodMetalConcrete, of Santa Fe.last_img read more

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Siding and Interior Finish Work in New Hampshire

first_imgQuarter-sawn spruce clapboardsStarting in late July, we turned our attention to the exterior and specifically the siding. While we considered trying to tackle this ourselves, we hired Eric again. Besides his skill and experience, he also had staging and a siding nail gun. Eric took the lead on the entire siding project. I helped on and off the staging and Kyra (plus her dad) did tons of staining.We had already ordered the siding in 2013 and stored it over the winter. The siding was quarter-sawn spruce clapboards from Ward Clapboard Mill in Vermont. Although quarter-sawn clapboards are more expensive than plain-sawn, they are more stable and less prone to cupping. We were willing to pay for this high quality, and balanced it by choosing Ward’s cottage grade, which includes blemishes and knots. This area on the west side of the house shows a large awning window with stained spruce clapboards, stained pine corner boards, and pine window trim finished with Vermont Natural Coatings exterior wood finish.Kyra was concerned that the cottage grade might look junky, but we liked how it turned out on another house project we had been following online (“Building a super-insulated Vermont home”). We also saved enough by choosing cottage grade that we paid to have the clapboards pre-primed — a good call that meant huge time savings for us. We installed the clapboards rough side out, and it looks awesome.The other big decision was what to do about a rainscreen.The siding project went from early August until mid-September 2014. Kyra and I also built overhangs over the two large fixed south-facing windows.We knew this was an important feature to build into the exterior, but weren’t sure about what materials to use. We ruled out 1×4 furring strips because we thought they would push out the siding too much and complicate the window trim. Ripping plywood sheets into strips was an option, but we settled on products from Cor-A-Vent, partially because we had seen them used successfully at the Up Hill House. We used Sturdi-Strips and SV-3 Siding Vent to create a â…œ-inch rainscreen gap, vented at both the top and bottom of the wall. Editor’s note: This is Part 4 of a multi-part blog series on the construction of Brian and Kyra’s home in New Hampshire. Here is a link to Part 5: Finishing Touches for a Pretty Good House in New Hampshire. Keeping the waterline from freezingOur well contractor was scheduled to come back in September to install the submerged well pump and well tank, and to hook it all up. Before this could happen, I had to do some stressful research and decision-making about what kind of heat cable to get.Because the water line was already hooked into the well casing and backfilled, we would have to push the heat cable into the water line from the house. The water line ran about 175 feet from the house to the well with some sweeping turns around the house and back towards the well. We made the call to get a 120-foot in-pipe heat cable that would protect the most vulnerable part of the water line starting at the house. (The 50 feet + near the well was buried deeper.)Our well contractor suggested a certain heat cable product, but I wasn’t able to find enough information about the product to make me feel comfortable with the purchase. After some internet research, I came across a company based in Canada called Heat-Line. We went with the 120-volt version of their Retro-Line, 120 feet long. It cost almost $2,000, but we didn’t have other good options. Pushing the 120-foot heat cable into the water line was straightforward. After all the stress, the work was completed in mid-September. ARTICLES BY BRIAN POST Building a Small House in the White MountainsPouring the Slab and Framing the WallsWindows, Housewrap, and Roofing Underlayment Finishing Touches for a Pretty Good House in New Hampshire Kyra and her dad working on the trim for one of the big south facing windows. These are fixed windows.After this was done, I sealed up the rough window openings with canned spray foam and we started working on window trim. Kyra’s dad came for the first of many visits at this time, helping on various projects with his woodworking skills.We liked the look of simple pine trim and went with 12-inch pine boards for the jambs and 4-inch pine boards for the casing. The window trim work required a lot of shimming and other fitting work, but it came out well. Kyra working on the east door overhang.To protect the exterior doors and entrance areas, we also hired a friend, Ray, to help us build protective roofs. We used Douglas fir posts, 2x6s, tongue-and-groove pine boards, and pine trim. We also used some leftover synthetic roofing underlayment and small metal roofing panels. Exhaust-only ventilationBased on the recommendation of our foundation/shell contractor, we went with an exhaust ventilation setup consisting of Panasonic WhisperGreen bath fans with Panasonic passive air inlets. We eventually settled on a WhisperGreen model that could run on continuous levels as low as 30 cfm and then be boosted (for set time periods or until turned “off”) up to 80 cfm.One fan was installed in the full bath upstairs and one in the half bath downstairs. Before insulation and drywall, we installed 4-inch rigid duct through the walls in the fan locations and the needed plastic duct for two passive air inlets (one downstairs and one in the main bedroom). The Panasonic passive air inlets are rated for 12 to 18 cfm, so we figured it would be OK to start with two, giving us up to 36 cfm of makeup air.Later, when we first powered on the fans with our electrician, we figured out that the two passive air inlets were not providing enough makeup air. The house was getting depressurized even with one fan running at only 30 cfm. This was happening because the house is so tight and the passive air inlets don’t allow as much air as advertised. (One online review said they tested at 10 cfm). For various reasons, adjusting our ventilation setup would be an ongoing theme as time went on; more on this later. Cabinets and interior stairsWe made good (but slow) interior progress over the winter and into spring 2014. The snow bank on the north side of the house finally melted in early May 2014; we continued with interior work and turned some attention to outside.Cabinet material stacked in the kitchen and ready to assemble.We had ordered ready-to-assemble cabinets from Barker Cabinets and kept everything stacked in the kitchen. We decided on Barker rather than a local cabinet company because the cabinets were higher quality for the price and the online ordering process was also straightforward. Brian Post is a photographer and website builder. He lives in Jackson, New Hampshire with his wife, Kyra Salancy, and a fluffy black dog. When not working on their house, Brian and Kyra enjoy climbing and skiing in the White Mountains. Space heat is all electricWe scheduled the installation of the ductless minisplit for early June 2014. One of these on the first floor would be our main heat source for the entire house. As backup on extremely cold nights (or if the minisplit malfunctioned) we planned to install small Stiebel Eltron wall-mounted electric heaters in each bathroom and bedroom, as well as a couple more in the open downstairs area.We went back and forth about which size minisplit to get, but eventually decided on a Mitsubishi FH12NA. While our Energy Star HERS rater suggested we might be better going up one size, we thought the FH12NA would meet our needs. Fortunately, the installation was completed in time to take advantage of a $500 rebate from the state of New Hampshire. Soffits and small protective roofsWe rehired Eric, one of the workers who helped the foundation/shell contractor, to take the lead on finishing the soffit. We used 1×8 tongue-and-groove pine, treated with an exterior wood finish from Vermont Natural Coatings. It came out great, and we really liked the natural pine look. We used 1×8 tongue and groove pine for the soffit. The exterior unit of the ductless minisplit. We built the small roof to protect the unit from rain and snow coming off the north side of the main roof.I helped Ray build the first roof and he helped us get started on the second. We took it from there and would end up using the same concept for overhangs over our large south facing windows and the exterior unit of the ductless minisplit. Finishing joists and floorsKyra and I, with help from her dad, continued on various interior projects. I spent multiple days on a stepladder with a face mask and eye protection working on the rough-sawn hemlock floor joists. I used a wire brush to clean them up and did some light sanding. We installed two clear coats of Vermont Natural Coatings. We used Southern yellow pine for the stair treads. We’ll make sure to install the skirtboards first next time.Kyra and her dad also worked on the stairs. The kitchen floor after the application of concrete stain and sealer.In early November 2014, we started finishing our concrete first floor. We had narrowed down our options to hiring a professional to grind and polish the slab or staining and sealing ourselves. Kyra and I decided this would be a good job to take on ourselves and save several thousand dollars. From Eco Safety Products we purchased several concrete finishing products, including their etcher and cleaner, stain, and finish/sealer.The first step was to test colors. We did this in an area that would be hidden later; we decided on the “Black Granite” color for most of the floor area.We tackled the kitchen first so that we could install cabinets before moving on to another floor section. The work was very labor-intensive. The steps consisted of: scrape/sand, clean floor with Simple Green, use etching/cleaning product, let floor dry, install two coats of stain, let dry, and install five or more coats of the finish/sealer.This work also required a lot of vacuuming, taping, rinsing, and the somewhat impossible task of keeping random debris and dog hair off the floor. The work was tiring, but we were happy with how the floors were turning out. We finished the kitchen and saved the other floor areas for later. The rough-sawn 2×12 hemlock floor joists were cleaned with a wire brush, sanded lightly, and protected with a clear finish. The winter of 2013-2014 started without much snow, but progressed into an extended period of cold and snow from February through March. Normally, we’d take advantage of this on skis, but the house project was occupying most of our attention. Drywall, window trim, and interior doorsThe drywall crew completed hanging, taping, and mudding the drywall in early February 2014. We went with rounded corners and the crew did a great job. The interior minisplit unit is on an interior wall in the central part of the first floor. Behind the wall is a small mechanical area, which allowed for easy runs of the lines to the exterior. Septic system and spruce floorsAs spring turned into summer, the septic system was finally inspected, approved, and backfilled.We continued on various interior and exterior projects. I ripped the Vycor Plus flashing tape off the exterior doors, spray foamed any gaps in the rough openings, used Siga Wigluv tape on the exterior part of the rough openings, patched up the housewrap, and installed some pine trim. The first room we finished was the second bedroom.The 2×6 tongue-and-groove spruce used for the second-story floors had gotten pretty beat up during the main construction phase. We rented a commercial orbital floor sander and that (along with some hand-held orbital sander work) did a good job of cleaning up the floors. We used a product from Vermont Natural Coatings (Polywhey Floor Finish) to finish the spruce floors.Kyra and I decided to finish the second bedroom first so it could serve as an initial finished room. We installed some pine baseboard and Kyra tackled the painting.We started by installing horizontal lengths of SV-3 siding vent along the bottom of the wall. Then we stapled the vertical Sturdi-Strips over the 16-inch-on-center studs. The Sturdi-Strips were doubled up on the corners. We installed the pine corner boards before the siding. The goal: an occupancy permitOver the rest of November and December, we continued on interior projects that would help us get an occupancy permit:Kyra and her dad put together the cabinet parts that we would install and secure to the walls later.Kyra and I built simple open vanities for the bathrooms.We had recently hired contractors to tile the shower and bathroom floors, Kyra and her dad installed the shower door.Our plumbing contractor came back to install and hookup the toilets, sinks, and hot water heater.I used my climbing skills and equipment to replace the plumbing vent flashing on the roof as it had a slight leak from a poor install job.Speaking of hot water, we decided on a short 30-gallon Rheem electric-resistance water heater because it was cheap, would meet our needs, and would fit in the mechanical room under the stairs.At this point in the house project, we were working hard towards getting the certificate of occupancy (CO), which we thought we needed to move in. While we had an affordable rental situation with friends, I was really itching to move into the house so we could stop paying rent and not have to commute back and forth. Editor’s note: This is the fourth in a series of blogs chronicling the design and construction of a house owned by Brian Post and Kyra Salancy. The first blog in the series was titled Building a Small House in the White Mountains. RELATED ARTICLES Up Hill HousePretty Good, Not So Big Maine HouseThe Potwine Passivhaus in AmherstKicking the Tires on a Passivhaus ProjectThe Pretty Good HouseMartin’s Pretty Good House ManifestoGreen Building for Beginners There was no functioning kitchen, but the house had heat and functioning bathrooms (see Image #3, below). One day, I met with the Jackson building inspector about our remaining tasks and found out it was OK for us to move in without the CO. That was all I needed to hear.Kyra was worried that the house wouldn’t be comfortable to live in yet, but I convinced her to go for it. In a matter of days, we moved all our belongings up to the house and spent our first night on the floor of the guest bedroom. It was December 23, 2014. We had a long ways to go, but it felt great to be in the house. We were also focusing on the upstairs: painting, installing pine trim, and hanging interior doors. We were trying to keep costs down, but did get affordable solid pine wood doors. With finishing products, we went with no/low VOC and more natural products whenever we could. This included using Vermont Natural Coatings PolyWhey finish on all the pine trim. This Panasonic FV-08VKS3 WhisperGreen bath fan was installed in the upstairs bathroom. The exhaust duct has a short, straight run to the east wall. We installed this fan in a frame below the ceiling so we wouldn’t break our air barrier. The 2x4s will later be trimmed with pine boards.last_img read more

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Vande Mataram singing at M.P. Secretariat back in new avatar

first_imgThe newly elected Congress government in Madhya Pradesh reintroduced the ‘Vande Mataram ritual’ at the State Secretariat in a novel way with much fanfare on Friday.The practice, which had been started by the previous BJP government for State government employees to be held at regular intervals, was stopped last month by Chief Minister Kamal Nath who had promised to hold the event in a “new form” on the first working day of every month.Keeping his word, Mr. Nath opened the event to common people and other officials besides the State government employees and made it much grander by introducing a police band and a road procession from Shaurya Smarak to Vallabh Bhavan, the Secretariat.Addressing the event, the Chief Minister launched a scathing attack on the BJP, which had criticised his order to discontinue the practice last month, by asking it to refrain from “teaching us patriotism”. “Patriotism runs in our blood and we don’t need lessons in patriotism from those who never took part in the country’s Independence movement,” said Mr. Nath while speaking to media persons after the conclusion of the programme.Large gatheringA large number of officials, State government employees and general public assembled at the Shaurya Smarak on Friday to take part in the event. From there they proceeded to Vallabh Bhavan to the beats of the police band which played several patriotic songs. The previous BJP government used to hold the national song singing programme at Sardar Vallabh Bhai Patel Park in the vicinity of Vallabh Bhavan.last_img read more

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Springing surprises of Jharkhand

first_imgTribal dances add colour and vigour to any local festivalDelightful trails that wind their way through pear orchards or lead to the shores of the serenely rippling lake await you in Jharkhand. If you’re adventurous enough to go deep into the forests, you may stumble on one of the leaf huts in which the local adivasis live, tucked away in the deepest shadow of the sal trees. And if you’re even luckier, you may tread in the footsteps of a tiger that has climbed the plateau. Satyajit Ray was so charmed by the forests that he shot parts of Aranyer Din Ratri here. Jharkhand, in the last five years, has wandered experimentally down new trails of many kinds.Metro mixEating options are everincreasing in the capitalUrban Jharkhand has always been developing in cities like Jamshedpur, but now Ranchi is catching up. The city has the Big Bazar shopping mall at its heart with all the convenience of electronics on the first floor, furniture on the second and fashions of the third. There’s a two-screen multiplex, Eylex showing the latest blockbusters and the Sujata Miniplex, that has been recently upgraded. The City Centre Mall is being built with Singapore consultancy and when complete, will include Ranchi’s first five-star hotel.Culture curryVisit tribal artists in Ranchi to pick up souvenirsIt isn’t all about modern shopping. Jharkhand is working on how best to display its traditions too. The Hotwar Museum is as recent as September 2009 and it sprawls over 10,000 sqm at the mega sports complex in Ranchi. Its air-conditioned interior houses an impressive collection of artefacts from the pre-historic and Harappan periods, along with recent historic finds excavated at Khukhragarh in the Ranchi district. Among must-sees are the prehistoric hand tools, monoliths and painted and unpainted pottery, some of them moulded between 1100-350 BC, the period in which Vyasa wrote the Mahabharata. There are also over a hundred 12th-century sculptures of Yakshas and Yakshinis found during an excavation at Ichagarh in East Singbhum.Another museum, this time focussing on Jharkhand’s tribals is to be found at the Sanskriti Centre in Hazaribagh. The Centre is housed in a heritage building set in the middle of six acres of lush orchards and trees. The museum houses a detailed archaeological record of the Hazaribagh region, ranging from the Lower Palaeolithic to the present, while the art gallery showcases 15 styles of painting in the Khovar and Sohrai schools with over 300 works of art on display.Tribal women artists exhibit their work at the gallery and, all in all, the Centre is a celebration of the colour and vibrancy of tribal life. In the last five years it has also worked around to developing its website so that it can appeal to a worldwide audience.Arty talesThe Hotwar Museum, a must visit, sprawls over 10,000 sqmHundreds of families of Amadubi village near Jamshedpur in Jharkhand have been illustrating local folk dances and tribal legends as well as other religious tales through the unique paintings that they have been making for centuries. What makes the paintings unique is the brightness and appeal of the illustrations that are made from different base media and colours ground from local herbs and stones. The tradition of paintings has been kept alive through the Guru-Shishya teaching method. The State Government is training the villagers to make their work more commercially sustainable.Tribal lifeAlong with art and culture, adivasi tourism is also developing fast. The Santhals are one of the oldest tribes in the country and then there are the Asurs, the Lohars and the Mundas. Some of them weave baskets, some are skilled blacksmiths forging intricate ornaments from iron, while others work with the bamboo. Thanks to a new tourism initiative many of these villages have opened up to tourists so that it is possible to sample their unspoilt way of life.Mine aheadOpt for the speedy way on the waters of JharkhandJharkhand has always been known for its mineral wealth, but there is an initiative to use the mines for something more than just minerals. Mining tourism is a concept that has been booming in Australia and South Africa and steps are being taken to make areas like the Regrappa mines and the North Karmpura mines in Ranchi district suitable for mining tourism. Hindustan Copper Ltd (HCL) and Central Coalfields Ltd (CCL) are consulting with the Jharkhand Tourism authorities and offering their mines for the experience.Festive spiritBig Bazar shopping mall in Ranchi is a huge step towards modernismThe Baba Baidyanath Vishva Mahotsav was kick-started in 2008 and ‘rollicking’ is how everyone describes the three-day affair. A blend of religion and adventure tourism, it gives visitors a chance to explore Deoghar’s temples and after the blessings try their hand at kayaking, snorkelling and yachting in 18 specially chosen lakes and rivers. Performers are brought in from the eastern states during August and there are also tribal dances and folk songs adding their rhythm.Adventure tourism is coming to Jharkhand in a big way promising to make life even more of an adventure in the coming days. With new hotels and a scenic setting, this is a destination that is sure to surprise the visitor.advertisementadvertisementFact fileAfter Australia and South Africa, mining tourism is now here to make wavesRanchi’s first five-star hotel Carlson Hotels Worldwide-Asia Pacific plans to open a Radisson hotel in Ranchi in April 2010.Hotwar Museum Mega Sports Complex, Hotwar, RanchiSanskriti Centre, Dipugarha, P.O. Hazaribagh; timings: 1.30p.m.-5p.m.; tel: (06546) 264 820; www.sanskritihazaribagh.comAmadubi village 90 km from Jamshedpur.Adivasi tourism Currently organised in Simdega and Lohardaga by Jharkhand Tourism. Contact (0651) 240 0981 or check www.jharkhandtourism.inMining tourism http://jharkhandi.com/miningtourism.aspxBaba Baidyanath Vishva Mahotsav 3 days in Jul/Aug 2010; www.babadham.orglast_img read more

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