Tag: 南京最近有没有场子开的

Colombian Navy launches first domestically manufactured vessel

first_img Other Navy ships built in Colombia “What we have today with this ship, which is 100 percent designed, manufactured and built in Colombia, is the dream of many people who put their hearts, hands, minds and efforts to transform steel into monuments for the homeland, peace, development and security,” said Pinzon. Thanks to the construction of these and other vessels, the Colombian naval industry is respected throughout the world by countries which purchase vessels manufactured in the country. The main mission of the Punta Espada will be to carry out maritime interdiction, patrol and surveillance operations in Colombian waters. Security forces will use it to detect, intercept, and inspect suspicious vessels. . “At the tactical and operational level, Colombia has responded to a number of needs that conflict and drug trafficking have been creating,” said Néstor Alfonso Rosania, a security analyst at the Center for Studies in Security, Defense and International Affairs of Colombia. The Armed Forces of Colombia will continue to receive the best available equipment and technological tools “because they are the ones who have put Colombia on a path towards peace,” the defense minister said. Defense Minister Juan Carlos Pinzón, and the commander of the National Navy, Admiral Hernando Wills, presided over the launching ceremony of the Punta Espada in Cartagena. “Colombia has entered a select group of countries that have the technology and knowledge to build these kind of vessels,” said Rear Adm. Roberto Sáchica, the president of Cotecmar. The ARC Punta Espada – the first CPV produced entirely in Colombia – touched water for the first time October 31. It was produced by the Science and Technology Corporation of Naval, Maritime and Riverine Industry Development (Cotecmar) in conjunction with the Social and Enterprise Defense Group (GSED), which is part of the Defense Ministry. By Dialogo November 28, 2014 “The coastal patrol boat responds to needs from armed conflict and transnational drug trafficking It will provide the Navy with more mobility and achievements in operations against threats facing the country. This boat is not only fundamental to Colombia’s Navy, but it is also important to the Colombian military industry at the international level.” “It is a great start that this patrol boat is already sailing,” Rosania said. “This boat is the result of scientific and technological development that the Colombian government has been implementing in recent years. The Navy understands the need to build vessels to monitor both oceans and prevent drug trafficking from continuing in these areas. Authorities are concentrating their efforts on developing new technologies to combat threats of transnational crime and various related offenses.” “What we have today with this ship, which is 100 percent designed, manufactured and built in Colombia, is the dream of many people who put their hearts, hands, minds and efforts to transform steel into monuments for the homeland, peace, development and security,” said Pinzon. The Colombian military industry has built other Navy vessels. For example, in February the Colombian Navy launched the ARC 20 de Julio, the largest ship built in the country. It was designed and built by Cotecmar. For example, in September 2012, Brazil bought four LPR-40 patrol boats which were manufactured in Cartagena. It is important and interesting that countries like Peru and Colombia are becoming more technical with respect to the Navy. I read about ESMERALDA, a Chilean sailing vessel in AGORA, which until now was the largest, but according to what I read now it will be the UNION. Congratulations to both governments for their interest in becoming one of the big players in this area. Your information is very timely. I work in the National Port Security Commission in Honduras as head of Port Security Audits (APIP in Spanish)… I hope you continue to contribute with more information. “I congratulate everyone who has contributed to these projects, which were no simple feat,” Pinzon said. “These are projects that carry the vision of great people of this country, officers, non-commissioned officers, engineers, sailors and good Colombians, who have visualized Colombia’s real and strategic capacity in naval and maritime matters for several years.” “It is a great start that this patrol boat is already sailing,” Rosania said. “This boat is the result of scientific and technological development that the Colombian government has been implementing in recent years. The Navy understands the need to build vessels to monitor both oceans and prevent drug trafficking from continuing in these areas. Authorities are concentrating their efforts on developing new technologies to combat threats of transnational crime and various related offenses.” The main mission of the Punta Espada will be to carry out maritime interdiction, patrol and surveillance operations in Colombian waters. Security forces will use it to detect, intercept, and inspect suspicious vessels. . The ARC Punta Espada – the first CPV produced entirely in Colombia – touched water for the first time October 31. It was produced by the Science and Technology Corporation of Naval, Maritime and Riverine Industry Development (Cotecmar) in conjunction with the Social and Enterprise Defense Group (GSED), which is part of the Defense Ministry. Other Navy ships built in Colombia Thanks to the construction of these and other vessels, the Colombian naval industry is respected throughout the world by countries which purchase vessels manufactured in the country. “At the tactical and operational level, Colombia has responded to a number of needs that conflict and drug trafficking have been creating,” said Néstor Alfonso Rosania, a security analyst at the Center for Studies in Security, Defense and International Affairs of Colombia. “The coastal patrol boat responds to needs from armed conflict and transnational drug trafficking It will provide the Navy with more mobility and achievements in operations against threats facing the country. This boat is not only fundamental to Colombia’s Navy, but it is also important to the Colombian military industry at the international level.” Improving Colombia’s strategic capacity The Punta Espada will help the Armed Forces continue on that path. Military officials appointed Naval Lt. Cmdr. Henry Mauricio Barón Franco as the patrol boat’s commander. He will take command of a vessel that measures 45.25 meters in length, 7.1 meters in beam and 1.84 meters in draught. It can accommodate a crew of 23 people, and is powered by two diesel engines which drive a fixed pitched propeller. It’s also outfitted with a 25-mm caliber cannon and two 60-mm caliber machine guns. Colombia’s security forces recently obtained an important tool in their fight against international drug trafficking – a coastal patrol vessel (CPV). Improving Colombia’s strategic capacity Colombian manufacturers used global technology to build the patrol boat, which has the capability of refueling rapid response boats. The Punta Espada will help the Armed Forces continue on that path. Military officials appointed Naval Lt. Cmdr. Henry Mauricio Barón Franco as the patrol boat’s commander. He will take command of a vessel that measures 45.25 meters in length, 7.1 meters in beam and 1.84 meters in draught. It can accommodate a crew of 23 people, and is powered by two diesel engines which drive a fixed pitched propeller. It’s also outfitted with a 25-mm caliber cannon and two 60-mm caliber machine guns. “Colombia has entered a select group of countries that have the technology and knowledge to build these kind of vessels,” said Rear Adm. Roberto Sáchica, the president of Cotecmar. The Armed Forces of Colombia will continue to receive the best available equipment and technological tools “because they are the ones who have put Colombia on a path towards peace,” the defense minister said. Defense Minister Juan Carlos Pinzón, and the commander of the National Navy, Admiral Hernando Wills, presided over the launching ceremony of the Punta Espada in Cartagena. The Colombian military industry has built other Navy vessels. For example, in February the Colombian Navy launched the ARC 20 de Julio, the largest ship built in the country. It was designed and built by Cotecmar. Colombia’s security forces recently obtained an important tool in their fight against international drug trafficking – a coastal patrol vessel (CPV). “I congratulate everyone who has contributed to these projects, which were no simple feat,” Pinzon said. “These are projects that carry the vision of great people of this country, officers, non-commissioned officers, engineers, sailors and good Colombians, who have visualized Colombia’s real and strategic capacity in naval and maritime matters for several years.” For example, in September 2012, Brazil bought four LPR-40 patrol boats which were manufactured in Cartagena. Colombian manufacturers used global technology to build the patrol boat, which has the capability of refueling rapid response boats. last_img read more

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Semi-Finals here we come! Kwakwani, LTI and NAMS continue to NSBF semis

first_imgTHE Youth Basketball Guyana (YBG) National Schools Basketball Festival (NSBF) U-19 quarterfinals showcased the best of the U-19 talent on the local circuit.There were three games played on the night, one blowout, one close encounter and one nail-biter that proved to be the game everyone was waiting to witness the entire tournament.In the first game of the night, Kwakwani Secondary made light work of Mackenzie High blowing them out of the water to show why they were defending champions winning 61-28. Led by the triple threat of national guards in Troy David, Stanton Rose and Damair Gladstone who had 10, 12 and 11 points respectively, the team cruised to victory. Kemmol Benjamin, Dillon Wallace and Jamal Gilkes registered 9, 7 and 6 points in the win also. For the outmatched Mackenzie side, Tim Veshon scored 8 points with Daniel Anthony supporting him with 7 points.The second encounter saw Linden Technical Institute spoiling the coming-out party for Jaleel Duke and his President’s College side in a game that finished 47-33. Led by Akinni Wilson’s 13, LTI continued their tradition of advancing to the final rounds to compete for a title. From the outset, President’s College, pushing the tempo and looking very threatening, while doing so behind Duke’s quick scoring.However, the tide soon changed as the Linden side started to lock down on defence and convert on offence. For Akinni, it was balanced scoring with an inside-out approach – whatever the defence gave him he took. He was supported by Tahquille Johnson’s 9. On the President’s College side, Jaleel Duke posted 14 points in the losing effort with Anton Fileen contributing 11.Sherland Gillis at line to close out the win for NAMS (Daniel Haynes photos)Sherland Gillis at line to close out the win for NAMS (Daniel Haynes photos)The final game of the night was definitely the one fans paid their money to see. New Amsterdam Multilateral Secondary (NAMS) took on St Rose’s High and won in a game that went into overtime and finished 36-29.From the tip, both teams seemed evenly matched, trading baskets after the initial feel-out process was over. It was not just a battle of big men and point guards, but a battle of coaches, with Rose’s Courtenay Taylor and NAMS Willon Cameron having both coached alongside each other at the National level.The battle of the ‘bigs’ that was expected turned out to be the mitigating factor with NAMS’ Neil Wills, and Sherland Gillis contributing 10 points each for their side, with points coming at crucial moments. For Rose’s it was the duo of Akil Vaughn and Leon Ross who held the offensive giant Wills to such a low total.Gillis was the X Factor for the NAMS side, and he seemed to find himself making the right basketball plays at the right moments. The first being a steal with seconds to go in the game leading to him being fouled and able to put away the game at the free throw line after Rose’s took the lead with a minute to go.For Rose’s it was Shamar Huntley whose 15 points stood out in the losing effort. There was much to be taken away from the game as in the overtime period the three-point shooting of Rose’s went awry. There were missed calls on both ends and the foul game ultimately contributed to the game’s outcome.Akinni Vaugn making a move for two of his points. Akinni Vaugn making a move for two of his points.Gillis was once again put at the line and made them count for the win. Coach Willon Cameron on how the win came to be stated “It was wanting it at all times, we fight and that’s what we’re about.”AN emotional coach Taylor also gave his input stating, “It was always going to be a competitive game given the fact both teams are similar in their make-up and how they play.”“The teams know each other as well through the friendship developed over the years but what played the separator in the teams was the officiating,” continued Taylor.The semi-final rounds tip off today and promise much more action. The tournament is sponsored by Digicel, Banks DIH Limited and Beharry Group of Companies.last_img read more

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Moorpark College hosts multiethnic celebration

first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Among dozens of attractions, the events included lectures on Chumash culture, a film about a Japanese-internment camp, a lecture on the Harry Potter books, demonstrations by drummers and martial artists, along with flamenco dancing and Cajun music. MOORPARK – The 16th annual Multicultural Day at Moorpark College included everything from what the Bible teaches us about nutrition to the history of the boomerang. The event focusing on diversity was held Wednesday to promote global understanding through presentations and performances about various cultures and arts. Vendors offered ethnic foods. Some faculty members allowed students to attend several of the events in lieu of going to class. Local kindergarten-through-12th-grade schools, as well as nearby colleges, were invited to bring their students to see and hear music, dance, drama and lectures. last_img read more

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