Tag: 上海2018年涉黄严打

Step Afrika Hosts DC Step Xplosion

first_imgThe internationally renowned District of Columbia based dance company, Step Afrika! kicks off its 20th Anniversary season with the second annual Step Afrika! Step Xplosion! Step Xplosion! brings the passion, excitement, and energy of stepping to DC Department of Parks and Recreation Centers in each ward throughout the District from Aug. 11 through Sept. 6. Upcoming shows include, Sept. 3 at 7 p.m. located at the RH Terrell Recreation Center; Sept. 4 at 7 p.m. at the Rita Bright Recreation Center and the culminating show on Sept. 6 at 2 p.m. located at the Raymond Recreation Center. All three venues are located in N.W. D.C. For more information on Step Xplosion! contact Joanne Coutts at 399-7993 Ext. 112 email: development@stepafrika.org, or visit http://www.stepafrika.org/performances/washington-dc/.last_img read more

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Hydrogen fuel cells provide power when fuel supply is off

first_img Journal information: Nano Letters This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org) — Fuel cells, which generate electricity from the chemical energy of a fuel such as hydrogen, are not intrinsically capable of storing energy. When a fuel cell’s hydrogen supply runs out or is temporarily interrupted, the cell’s power output quickly decreases to zero. If an application requires energy storage, then the fuel cell must be coupled to an external charge storage device, such as a battery, which increases the weight and volume of the system. But now researchers have designed a hydrogen fuel cell with a new anode that can supply electricity up to 14 times longer than conventional fuel cells, which could be particularly useful for mobile energy applications. New fuel cell keeps going after the hydrogen runs out Copyright 2012 Phys.org All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Explore further (Left) Each dark speck within the nine white circles is a tiny fuel cell. An AA battery is shown for size comparison. Image credit: Caroline Perry, SEAS Communications (Right) One of the nine circles is magnified in this image, showing the wrinkled surface of the electrochemical membrane. Image credit: Quentin Van Overmeerecenter_img For now, the researchers do not know exactly what allows the new fuel cell to run after its supply is cut off. They identified and tested three possible charge storage mechanisms, with the results showing that reversible oxidation of the anode contributed a portion of the observed charge, but did not account for all of it. The finding suggests that the power generation in the absence of fuel arises from multiple mechanisms.Although identifying the underlying mechanisms will require further research, the discovery that vanadium oxide anodes can store energy and deliver power when the fuel supply is depleted could be useful for developing future miniature power sources. Applications could include miniature autonomous systems, military technologies, and other devices that need to operate for short time periods.”Unmanned aerial vehicles, for instance, would really benefit from this,” said Van Overmeere. “When it’s impossible to refuel in the field, an extra boost of stored energy could extend the device’s lifespan significantly.” More information: Quentin Van Overmeere, Kian Kerman, and Shriram Ramanathan. “Energy Storage in Ultrathin Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.” Nano Letters. DOI: 10.1021/nl301601y The laboratory setup for testing solid-oxide fuel cells. Image credit: Caroline Perry, SEAS Communications Citation: Hydrogen fuel cells provide power when fuel supply is off (2012, July 11) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-07-hydrogen-fuel-cells-power.html The researchers, Quentin Van Overmeere, Kian Kerman, and Shriram Ramanathan, at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences in Cambridge, Massachusetts, have published their study on the energy-storing solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) in a recent issue of Nano Letters.In their study, the researchers fabricated the solid-oxide fuel cell’s anode with either vanadium oxide or a combination of vanadium oxide and porous platinum. Vanadium is known for its tendency to change oxidation state, a process that involves the transfer of electrons. Since a key to enabling fuel cells to store charge is to use materials that can reversibly transfer electric charges, vanadium’s properties make it a good candidate for these technologies. “This thin-film SOFC takes advantage of recent advances in low-temperature operation to incorporate a new and more versatile material,” said Ramanathan. “Vanadium oxide at the anode behaves as a multifunctional material, allowing the fuel cell to both generate and store energy.”The researchers’ experiments showed that, after the hydrogen fuel supply is turned off, fuel cells with the vanadium oxide anode could generate power for more than 3 minutes, compared with about 10-15 seconds for fuel cells with porous platinum anodes. Both fuel cells produced a comparable amount of power, and the researchers expect that future improvements will further extend this time. With the ability to store electrochemical energy, the new device could be thought of as combining the characteristics of a fuel cell and a battery.last_img read more

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Art and evolution

first_imgWorks of artists from Portugal, Angola, Brazil, Cape Verde, Mozambique and India comprise the travelling exhibition underway at the India International Centre here. The series of uncanny artworks seem to tell a story. An anti-clock wise tour of the gallery indicates an evolution, a moving forward of time.Organised by Perve Galeria with support of the Portugal Embassy, the exhibition Lusophonies/Lusofonias display both modern and contemporary art by different generations of the Portuguese speaking countries or Lusophones which include Portugal, Angola, Brazil, Cape Verde, Mozambique and certain parts of India. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’All the artworks in the exhibition have a common connection, whether experiential or through a formal aesthetic, related to African roots. A troika of oxymoronic images, two from India and one from Africa, serves as a prologue to the collection which manifests the cross-cultural developments that followed the colonization across continents and the struggle against it.“The origin of this collection was the need to reflect on how lusophone countries saw and see Lusophonie, a plural and dialectical vision, full of discrepancies, ambiguities and mutual contamination about culture, society, and even about a common language,” says Nunes. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe show has been chronologically divided into three sections: ‘Colonialism’, ‘Independence’ and ‘Miscegenation and Diaspora.’  Moving from one period to another in the anthology portrays a clear evolution from the “tendency to use art as a revolutionary discourse” in colonies to the establishment of sovereign political regimes after independence.“In Portugal, the freedom of speech that followed several decades of repression was a symptom of the artistic development,” says Nunes. The final part of the Lusophonies exhibition represents the artistic development that has occurred over time extending up to the present, not only in the lusophone world, but also in the countries where artists today work about Lusophonie and African influence issues. Representation from India includes two photographs by Subodh Kerkar and a set of pots or ‘matkas’ usually used by women in Indian villages to carry water.Closing this chapter of exhibition, which speaks majorly of the African influence, is a box of postcard sized artworks, some of them suspended in the air through strings around it, by Nobel Laureate author Gabriel Garcia Marquez. The exhibition is set to be on display till February 15.last_img read more

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Motorists race along here at more than 90mph Families back calls for

first_imgDriver named following fatal collision Want to tell us about something going on where you live? Let us know – Tweet us @SOTLive or message us on our Facebook page. And if you have pictures to share, tag us on Instagram at StokeonTrentLive. Punter found hiding in bushes Get the biggest Daily stories by emailSubscribeSee our privacy noticeThank you for subscribingSee our privacy noticeCould not subscribe, try again laterInvalid EmailResidents and community leaders are calling for the speed limit to be slashed on a busy road where motorists hit speeds of more than 90mph. Dozens of accidents have been reported on the section of the A51 – between Aston Marina, on the outskirts of Stone, and the A34 roundabout – in the past decade. It has sparked calls for the speed limit to be cut from 60mph to 40mph. Now Stone Town Council is writing to Staffordshire County Council to urge them to take action. Families say that stretch of the A51 is ‘dangerous’. The A51 at its entrance to Aston Marina, near Stone Councillor Mike Williamson said: “As a keen cyclist I used to cycle along the A51 to go to Sandon. But I have stopped doing that – it’s much too dangerous to consider going on a bicycle. “If I want to go to Sandon I go to The Star and cycle along the towpath. I would rather fall into the canal than be hit by someone going at 60mph.” Read MoreTop stories on StokeonTrentLive A stretch of the A51 between Aston Marina and the A34 roundabout Gill Howe, from Aston Lodge, said: “I’ve lived here for 22 years and this road has always been a problem. I nearly get taken out most days and I think the filter lanes confuse people. Getting out of Aston Marina and pulling into Stone, when you need to slow down or speed up, is dangerous.” Read MorePlans revealed to fit all taxis with CCTV cameras to keep passengers safe – do you think it’s a good idea?   Kat Davis, aged 40, added: “It will be a good idea to reduce the speed limit. There have been accidents and 40mph would be a sensible speed. I’ve witnessed a few near-misses and the bend in the road doesn’t help when people are doing 60mph. The filter lanes also mean that traffic is in the middle of the road with fast cars going past either side.” The roundabout of the A34 and the A51 near Stone A number of residents have written to the town council to support the campaign. Read MoreWatch the moment police catch this driver speeding between cameras on the A34   Town councillors have backed the speed reduction calls. Dad slams ‘disgusting’ hospital window Police search for missing womanlast_img read more

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