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JE Pistons awards renewed for four IMCA divisions

first_imgIRVINE, Calif. – Nine sets of pistons and more than $9,000 worth of product certificates will be awarded to IMCA drivers racing built engines again this season by JE Pistons.Champions in each of the five Xtreme Motor Sports IMCA Modified regions and both IMCA Sunoco Stock Car regions, as well as national IMCA Late Model and IMCA EMI RaceSaver Sprint Car champions all receive pistons from the Irvine, Calif., manufacturer.Product certificates valued at $400, $300, $200 and $150, respectively, will be awarded to eligible second through fifth place drivers in regional Modified and Stock Car, and national Late Model and Sprint Car standings.“Everyone at JE is a proud supporter of the IMCA and circle track racing,” said Director of Marketing Sean Crawford. “We’re happy to support the racers and help keep their engines running strong and on the race track.”Awards will be presented during the national IMCA banquet in November or mailed beginning the following week from the IMCA home office.JE Pistons returned to the IMCA marketing partner ranks last season.“We are in our sixth season overall partnering with JE Pistons and it is a pleasure to work with aftermarket engine parts manufacturers who continue to support IMCA racers,” commented IMCA Marketing Director Kevin Yoder. “Modified drivers racing a claim engine, and all drivers in the other divisions have a shot at high quality sets of pistons through this program and we hope they support JE at every opportunity.”Information about JE-manufactured pistons and piston kits is available by calling 714 898-9763, on Facebook and at the www.jepistons.com website.last_img read more

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British and Irish success in Minsk

first_img Leeds light-flyweight Jack Bateson continued to impress in his first major international tournament with a unanimous points victory over Romania’s Ovidiu Berceanu. And Scotland’s Charlie Flynn is also through to his first major quarter-final after an equally emphatic victory over Serban Miroslav of the Czech Republic. Bateson and Flynn join fellow Britons Andrew Selby, Sam Maxwell and Joe Joyce, who negotiated their respective paths to the last eight on Monday. Five British and five Irish boxers will fight for guaranteed medals on Wednesday after another successful day at the European Amateur Championships in Minsk. Belfast’s double Olympic bronze medallist Paddy Barnes marched into the last eight of the light-flyweight division with a unanimous win over gutsy Welshman Ashley Williams. Olympic silver medallist and bantamweight top seed John Joe Nevin is also through after impressing in a 3-0 win over Selcuk Exer of Turkey. On a good day for Ireland, middleweight Jason Quigley and heavyweight Tommy McCarthy also moved through with points wins over Austria’s Arbi Chakaev and Finland’s Tomi Honka respectively. They join Ireland team-mate and Olympic bronze medallist Michael Conlan, who booked his place in the bantamweight quarter-finals on Monday. There was disappointment for Sunderland heavyweight Warren Baister, who was outpointed by Russia’s Aleksei Egorov, Birmingham bantamweight Gamal Yafai, who lost a split decision to Armenian Aram Avagyan, and middleweight Antony Fowler who lost to fourth-seeded German Stefan Haertel. Scotland pair Aston Brown and Joe Ham also bowed out with defeats to Romania’s Bogdan Juratoni and Russia’s Vladimir Nikitin respectively. The only Irishman to exit on Tuesday was London Olympian Adam Nolan, who fell to a unanimous points loss in his welterweight clash with Ukrainian Boghdan Shelestyuk. center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

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Luck on singer’s side as she makes splash in Vegas

first_imgLAS VEGAS – Sarah Todora, an unassuming 18-year-old with a Louisiana drawl, has landed a gig at the Sahara hotel and casino on the Las Vegas Strip. And thanks to a mysterious benefactor, Todora and her father-promoter, Phil, 44, pay $1 a month to stay at a three-bedroom condominium in a high-rise luxury tower where residences sell for up to $9 million. It’s an upbeat twist of fate in a city known for its second chances. And the show-business community’s embrace of their plight is a world removed from the cold devastation the pair faced when Katrina blew ashore. “I know it ain’t me,” said Todora, whose smoky presence on stage belies her shyness off it. “So, yeah, got to be faith, got to be God. Something.” Three months ago, after their car was stolen and with no real prospects in Las Vegas, the Todoras were prepared to retreat to Louisiana. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREOregon Ducks football players get stuck on Disney ride during Rose Bowl eventThe Lafayette, La., natives had come west to promote bands from New Orleans. But two days after arriving, Katrina hit back home. It took three weeks before the Todoras could reach any of the band members they represented, by then scattered by the storms to Houston, New York and Atlanta. “These are whole bands that got separated,” Phil Todora said. “Instruments, CDs, press kits, computers, everything gone.” The Todoras spent their first weeks in Nevada at a budget motel, numb as TV broadcasts relayed the Gulf Coast’s unfolding disaster. Their reason for being in Las Vegas was all but gone and the money was quickly running out. But Sarah Todora had won praise for her husky vocals at festivals in Louisiana and Washington, D.C., and wasn’t ready to give up. “Sarah said, `Dad, let’s go. Everybody else is back home, but me and you are here. Let’s go do it. You do what you do, I’ll do what I do and we’ll crawl out of this hole,”‘ he recalled. Phil Todora approached Jerry Tiffe, a friend of a friend and a lounge singer who for 28 years worked places like the Sands and Tropicana. Tiffe let Sarah perform with him at a neighborhood restaurant and lounge. Then, thanks to a call from Tiffe, the Sahara’s director of marketing and entertainment, Ron Garrett, dropped by to catch the act. In the show, the willowy blonde segues from covers of Tracy Chapman and Norah Jones to an original song inspired by her encounter with a fast-talking Nashville promoter. In a guttural performance of “Too Young for Nashville,” she tells how she gave up aspirations to be the next LeAnn Rimes so she could sing the blues.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img
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Dispute over Grabher licence plate heats up as NS man told to

first_imgHALIFAX – A Nova Scotia man fighting to have his last name — Grabher — reinstated on a licence plate says police have now forced him to remove an inactive Alberta plate from the front of his car.Lorne Grabher said he received a call from police Monday after a complaint was lodged against the personalized Alberta licence plate he had on the front of his car.Nova Scotia requires only one valid plate, at the rear, and drivers in the province often place inactive or novelty plates on the front of their vehicles.Grabher says police told him he would face a stiff penalty for driving with a fraudulent plate if he did not remove the Alberta plate, which had his last name on it in capitalized letters.The 69-year-old man said he feels he’s being unfairly targeted.“I’ve been red-flagged,” he said from his Dartmouth home, noting the large number of vehicles in the province that have inactive out-of-province plates on the front.Grabher received international attention after the Registry of Motor Vehicles revoked his personalized Nova Scotia plate bearing his last name, saying it was a “socially unacceptable slogan.”“The issue for me is where does anybody, especially the government, get the right to discriminate against somebody’s name,” he said. “The only place I can think of where they do stunts like that is if you live in a communist country.”The Justice Centre for Constitutional Freedoms is representing Grabher, and says the revocation infringes on his constitutional rights.The organization filed a notice of application with the provincial Supreme Court seeking to overturn the decision.A hearing on the matter scheduled for Wednesday was postponed to June 6 after a lawyer representing the province requested more time to “gather the names of witnesses” and “confirm instructions with my client.”Grabher called the legal dispute a waste of taxpayer dollars.“It’s my last name,” he said. “We’ve had this licence plate in my family for 27 years.”Grabher said his last name is a point of pride for his family and its Austrian-German heritage.In the early 1800s, Grabher’s great-great-grandfather made the journey from Austria to the United States, part of a wave of settlers.His grandfather then moved to Canada in 1890 and put down roots in Alberta.Grabher said his father joined the army at the age of 17, during the Second World War, and was sent to Cape Breton, where his family settled.He said revoking his personalized licence plate is foolish and offensive.Grabher said he is now using an alphanumeric licence plate on the rear of his car, and has removed the old Alberta plate from the front as requested by police.last_img read more

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