Tag: 上海夜网ZO

Second-string proves not to be 2nd rate

first_imgIOWA CITY, Iowa — It may have been Senior Day at Kinnick Stadium, but the afternoon belonged to a junior. Making his first career start, in place of the injured John Stocco, junior quarterback Tyler Donovan was thrust into about as unsavory a situation as could be imagined. The shifty scrambler was charged with leading Wisconsin into one of the Big Ten’s most hostile environments to take on a team no current Badger had ever beaten: the Iowa Hawkeyes, who were looking to right a season that has gone awry with another timely win over UW. “It doesn’t get much more high pressure than that,” sophomore cornerback Jack Ikegwuonu said. Surrounded by noise and bloodthirsty defenders, Donovan, playing with a chip on his shoulder that could be seen from the nosebleed section, calmly quarterbacked Wisconsin to a hard-fought 24-21 victory.”I wanted to prove something to myself, but more so, I wanted to prove something to the team,” a reserved and still very collected Donovan said after the game. “I don’t think you can say enough about a guy starting his first game in the Big Ten finale in a hostile environment,” Bielema said. “The plays he was able to come up with today were amazing and gratifying to watch as a coach.”Often standing in the middle of a maelstrom of chaos, with blitzing Hawkeyes coming at him from every direction, Donovan calmly led the Badgers down the field on several key scoring drives. After getting out to a fast start, where Donovan completed his first seven passes en route to a 10-0 Wisconsin lead, the Badgers watched Iowa’s Drew Tate briefly catch fire, as the Hawkeyes scored twice and took the lead. With the pendulum of momentum — a favorite expression of Barry Alvarez — swinging in the direction of Iowa, the junior signal-caller almost immediately led UW on a six-play 73-yard scoring drive punctuated by a spectacular 42-yard touchdown by receiver Luke Swan. On the drive, Donovan accounted for every yard, either via passing or scrambling. “He took some shots, too,” senior safety Joe Stellmacher said. “I don’t know how he got up from all of them, but he did.”Donovan came up big again late. As the Badgers clung to a perilous 17-14 lead, Iowa downed a punt at the UW 3-yard line that left Donovan standing in the Hawkeyes’ end zone — with the howling student section at his back, no more than 20 feet away. After a short P.J. Hill run, Donovan took the snap and dropped back 2 yards deep into the Iowa scoring box and with two Iowa defenders closing in, he completed a strike to tight end Travis Beckum for 13 yards and some much needed breathing room. The play set up a simply sparkling 15-play, 97-yard scoring drive that proved to be the decisive point in the contest. The march down the field might’ve been led by a quarterback making his first start, but during it Donovan was nothing less than a field general, poised beyond his experience. “For the first start of his career he was so poised,” Stellmacher said. “He was really playing to win, I mean you could see that. He was holding nothing back, he was playing to win and played his heart out.”My hat’s off to him.”Donovan has had to sit behind Stocco for three years and hear questions about his decision-making and arm strength. He then had to watch the new coaching staff bring in an experienced transfer in former Kansas State starter Allen Evridge, who will be eligible to play next season. The game may prove to be something of an audition for Donovan as the Badgers’ 2007 starting quarterback position. “I’m sure after this season is completed, everybody is going to want to know who the starting quarterback is at the University of Wisconsin, and I think [Donovan] took a huge step forward in that area right now,” Bielema said. “Today he went out there, was able to execute and get a win.”last_img read more

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Is Lane Kiffin beyond a point of maturation?

first_imgTo everyone — the pundit, the avid fan, the man who sells you bacon-wrapped hot dogs on Exposition Boulevard — Lane Kiffin represents a number of things.To some, he’s a perpetual brat.To others, he’s a Trojan prince, leading USC back from NCAA sanctions.Growing up · Though the fourth-youngest head coach in the Football Bowl Subdivision, Kiffin has experienced his share of controversy. – Razan Al Marzouqi | Daily TrojanTruth, in turn, becomes muddied, and it’s understandably challenging to decipher fact from fiction. Just who exactly is the Trojans’ third-year coach? Do the stereotypes stick? Is he actually that arrogant? Is he actually the boy wonder?But answering just yes or no to such sweeping generalities would be dishonest and unfair. I can’t pretend to respond to either, exactly. Many of us cover Lane Kiffin, but how many of us truly know Lane Kiffin on any sort of personal level?I have interacted with him enough to express a few opinions confidently. For starters, I’ve found him to be thoughtful and calculated — he doesn’t do or say things for the sake of simply doing or saying them. And two, he carries a better sense of humor than he’s given credit for. I like that.But as many will inevitably point out, that doesn’t mean his record is spotless.More or less, he comes across as incredibly stubborn.This is one flaw that has been accentuated in recent weeks, as USC stumbled at Stanford, 21-14, and four days later, he infamously stormed out of a press conference after 29 seconds following a question about the return of an injured player.“Kiffin is a talented, aggressive recruiter and a decent football strategist whose spoiled-brat arrogance constantly undermines his efforts to become a great coach,” wrote Grantland’s Shane Ryan last month. “He stretches rules, misreads interpersonal situations, and issues the wrong kind of challenges to his enemies. People excuse these as the follies of youth, but that’s a cop-out; they’re the follies of character, and maturity isn’t always related to age.”Yup, there are flaws. Ryan chooses the term “spoiled-brat arrogance,” which leans toward hyperbole but is unmistakably rooted in reality. Football coaches tend to be stubborn-minded, petty people. They’re often micromanagers. And Kiffin is a football coach, after all.But the funny thing is, No. 13 USC reversing course this season and meeting its Coliseum-sized preseason expectations largely hinges on whether Kiffin, 37, can still grow as a coach and become less stubborn, and more mature.Friday indicated this might be possible.Toward the end of his team’s bye-week practice at Howard Jones Field, Kiffin, fielding questions from a smaller contingent of reporters, at last admitted a rather obvious but important point. As the team’s offensive play caller, he called a subpar game in USC’s mid-September road loss to Stanford — in case anyone wasn’t aware.“You’d love to have it back but you can’t,” he said. “In coaching, you’re just like players. Every game is not the same. You’re going to have some games where you make some better calls and get in a rhythm. I didn’t feel like I did really well in that game with our players.”He took blame, and it was refreshing.What makes this noteworthy is that it was a public admission. For a while now, Kiffin has received a substantial amount of criticism for a failure to take ownership — at least publicly — for events that have transpired during his tenure, including the Stanford game. Usually, he has deferred, highlighting a particular play or circumstance.But Friday’s admission suggests a lot.It suggests the “arrogant” coach might be open to honest, self-evaluation. It suggests the coach is receptive to criticism. It suggests the coach can still reflect and look to better himself.That said, none of the aforementioned possibilities might be true. But I want to be fair and at least give him that chance. Cynicism shouldn’t be our guiding principle. As much time as we’ve invested in thinking about Kiffin, he still hasn’t reached the age of 40 and has only been a head coach for a total of 62 games.That’s relatively young, which begs the question whether he has room to grow.The Trojans’ success over the remaining two-thirds of the season will be tied to his ability — or inability — to do so. “The 19th Hole” runs Tuesdays. If you would like to comment on this story, visit DailyTrojan.com or email Joey at jrkaufma@usc.edu.last_img read more

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Goodness Ohiremen Ajayi strengthened FC Široki Brijeg

first_img(Source: klix.ba) A new name in lines of FC Široki Brijeg is a 21-year-old attacker, Goodness Ohiremen Ajayi.Nigerian international player is coming as a borrowed player from HNK Rijeka. The student of Academy of Abuja, arrived with only 18 years old in a club from Kantrid. He made his debut for the first team of HNK Rijeka against Istria on the 12th of July at the opening of the season 2012/2013.Ajayi is the 3rd big reinforcement of FC Široki Brijeg that arrived in the last seven days. Before him, the team of Davor Mladina was reinforced by Ivan Crnov and Ivan Sesar. Players of FC Široki Brijeg the new season in the Premier League of B&H with the triumph over team from Travnik, on guest terrain.last_img read more

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