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2 Indian nationals arrested in Nepal

first_imgKathmandu: Nepal Police have arrested two Indian nationals in separate cases of plotting to kill a local man here and for possessing narcotic substances. Nineteen-year-old Kunal Kumar, a resident of Sitamarhi in Bihar, was arrested from Metro City Hotel in Biratnagar for allegedly plotting a murder, police said. The police confiscated two automatic pistols, four magazines and eight rounds of bullets from Kumar. Along with Kumar, the police have also arrested Mannu Gupta, a resident of Biratnagar, for his involvement in the plot. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from USGupta had hired Kumar and two others — Hari Narayan Jha from Sarlahi in Nepal and Rakesh Jha from Sitamarhi — to execute the alleged murder plan, according to Nepal Police. Further investigation is on, police said. In a separate case, 25-year-old Rahul Kumar, a resident of Vaishali in Rajasthan, has been arrested from Balkhu in the outskirts of Kathmandu and narcotic substance recovered from him. The Narcotic Drugs Control Unit of Nepal Police confiscated 171 ampules of dyzapam, 171 ampules of bruphen, 167 ampules of phenergan from his possession.last_img read more

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What a player Ganguly calls Kohli

first_imgPort of Spain: India skipper Virat Kohli scored a majestic hundred at the Queen’s Park Oval as the Men in Blue registered a comprehensive win over West Indies in a rain-affected second ODI. India defeated West Indies by 59 runs (DLS method), thus taking an unassailable 1-0 lead in the three-match rubber, the final of which will be played on Wednesday at the same venue. On Sunday, Kohli brought up his 42nd century during the course of which he went past former India skipper Sourav Ganguly tally of 11,363 runs in the list of leading run-getters in ODI cricket. Also Read – Puducherry on top after 8-wkt win over Chandigarh The 30-year-old has scored 11,406 runs at 59.91 in 238 matches and is currently at the eighth spot in the list topped by legendary Indian batsman Sachin Tendulkar who compiled 18,426 runs in 463 matches. Soon after Kohli broke his record, Ganguly tweeted: “Virat Kohli another master class in one day cricket…what a player.” During the course of his 120-run knock, the Delhi lad also became the first batsman to complete 2,000 ODI runs against West Indies. The previous record was 1,930 by Javed Miandad, whom Kohli passed in his 34th inning against the Windies. The Indian skipper now has eight centuries to his name against West Indies. He also has eight tons against two other teams — Australia and Sri Lanka. Sachin Tendulkar holds the record for scoring maximum hundreds against a single opposition — 9 against Australia. He had also scored eight hundreds against Sri Lanka. No other batsmen have more than seven centuries against a single opposition.last_img read more

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PM Modi emplanes for France to attend G7 Summit will speak on

first_imgManama: Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Sunday left for France from here to attend the G7 Summit where he will speak on burning global issues of environment, climate and digital transformation and also meet world leaders.Modi, who was in Manama on the third leg of his three-nation tour to France, the UAE and Bahrain, concluded his visit with prayers at the 200-year-old Shreenathji Temple in Manama, the oldest temple in the region. “After the first ever visit by an Indian Prime Minister to Bahrain, as a special gesture PM @narendramodi is seen off by Deputy PMs HH Mohammed bin Mubarak and HH Khalid bin Abdullah as he emplanes for Biarritz, France to participate in #G7Summit as Biarritz Partner,” Ministry of External Affairs Raveesh Kumar tweeted. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from USDuring the G7 Summit, which will be held in the picturesque seaside French town of Biarritz, the Prime Minister will address sessions on environment, climate, oceans and digital transformation. Though India is not a member of the G-7 grouping, Modi has been personally invited by the French President Emmanuel Macron. The Ministry of External Affairs (MEA) had said that the invitation was a “reflection of the personal chemistry” between the two leaders and also “recognition of India as a major economic power”. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential pollsThe countries which are part of the G7 include the UK, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the US. On the sidelines of the G7 Summit, Modi and US President Donald Trump are likely to discuss the situation in Kashmir, trade issues and other topics of mutual interest.Earlier this week in Washington, Trump said that he would discuss with Prime Minister Modi the situation in Kashmir and help ease the Indo-Pak tensions when they meet at the G7 Summit in France this weekend. Tensions between India and Pakistan spiked after India abrogated provisions of Article 370 of the Constitution to withdraw Jammu and Kashmir’s special status and bifurcated it into two Union Territories, evoking strong reactions from Pakistan.India has categorically told the international community that the scrapping of Article 370 of the Constitution to revoke the special status of Jammu and Kashmir was an internal matter and also advised Pakistan to accept the reality.Modi is also expected to meet the new British Prime Minister Boris Johnson. The two leaders spoke on phone earlier this week and agreed on the importance of working together to tackle climate change and other threats to biodiversity. Modi and Johnson also spoke on the need to further strenghten the bilateral partnership, particularly through trade and economic relations. “The bilateral visit to France and the invitation to G7 Summit are in keeping with the tradition of strong and close partnership and high level political contacts between India and France,” the MEA said in a press statement ahead of the prime minister’s visit.last_img read more

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Hong Kong police use water cannon in latest clashes

first_imgHong Kong: Hong Kong police used water cannon for the first time Sunday, raising the stakes against protesters who have staged sometimes violent rallies that have rocked the city for the past three months. Officers were also seen with drawn sidearms as protesters clashed with police in the district of Tsuen Wan after a rally at a nearby sports stadium. The financial hub has been gripped by mass rallies that were initially against a proposed extradition bill to China, but have spun into a wider pro-democracy movement targeting the pro-Beijing government. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from USAs thousands of people marched in the pouring rain to Tsuen Wan, a group of hardcore protesters erected makeshift roadblocks and dug up bricks from the pavements. After firing tear gas in an attempt to disperse the crowds, police drove water cannon vehicles onto the streets, unfurling signs warning protesters they would deploy the jets if they did not leave. The jets were later fired from the moving trucks towards a crowd of protesters who ran away, but hardcore group of protesters later threw bricks and Molotov cocktails in violent confrontations with riot police. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential pollsThere were no immediate reports of injuries. Police had previously said the vehicles, complete with surveillance cameras and multiple spray nozzles, would only be used in the event of a “large-scale public disturbance”. Throughout the protests, Beijing has used a mix of intimidation, propaganda and economic muscle to constrict the protests in a strategy dubbed “white terror” by the movement. The MTR – the city’s metro – is the latest Hong Kong enterprise to face public censure, after appearing to bend to Chinese state-media attacks accusing the transport system of being an “exclusive” service to ferry protesters to rallies. On Sunday the MTR shut stations near the main demonstration area in Tsuen Wan, in the second day of station closures in-a-row. “However bleak our future is, we’re trying to express ourselves rationally,” said Peter, in his 20s, before the clashes began. “We have faith in ourselves and we have faith in our city that some day our demands will be answered.” A second rally in the afternoon of a few hundred people – some of them family members of police – criticised the government for leaving officers to handle the brunt of the crisis, while also calling for an independent investigation into the police handling of the protests. “I believe within these two months, police have got enough opprobrium,” said a woman who asked not to be named and said she was a police officer’s wife. The city’s officers are often the focus of protesters’ anger because of their perceived heavy handling of the rallies. Ten people were left in hospital after Saturday’s clashes – two in a serious condition – staff said, without detailing if they were police or protesters. On Saturday police baton-charged protesters and fired tear gas, while demonstrators threw rocks and bottles later into the night in a working-class neighbourhood. Protesters say Hong Kong’s unique freedoms are in jeopardy as Beijing tightens its political chokehold on the semi-autonomous city. The city had appeared to have pulled back from a sharp nosedive into violence, with the last serious confrontation taking place more than a week ago, shortly after protests paralysed the airport.last_img read more

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Tories want action against selfconfessed terror recruit living in Toronto

first_imgOTTAWA – Conservative MPs say the government should be going after a Canadian who told a New York Times podcast that he shot people in the head as an executioner for Islamic State militants in Syria.The man, who used the name Abu Huzaifa al-Kanadi, is now reported to be living in Toronto.In question period on Friday, Conservatives demanded government action, but Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale was cautious, saying he couldn’t comment because of security concerns.“This individual is speaking freely to the media,” said Conservative House leader Candice Bergen. “The government has got to know where he is.”Bergen said he told the podcast he won’t be held responsible for his killings.“The media are reporting this individual is in Toronto, right now, as we speak. Can the government confirm it? Why isn’t this government doing something?”Goodale said police and security agencies are doing their jobs properly.“I am charged with the responsibility of keeping Canadians safe,” he said. “Discussing operational matters on the floor of the House of Commons is exactly the opposite of keeping Canadians safe.”Bergen, however, was not backing down.“This guy is apparently in Toronto,” she said. “Canadians deserve more answers from this government. Why aren’t they doing something about this despicable animal?”CBC News reported in 2017 that Abu Huzaifa had been questioned extensively by RCMP and CSIS, but had not been charged.The Canadian Security Intelligence Service has estimated that about 60 Canadians have returned home after fighting with foreign terror groups.The federal government has established a centre to fund research and programs to stop radicalization and help people leave extremist groups, although the Conservatives have scorned its efforts as little more than poetry lessons for terrorists.The government says it has a host of other counter-terrorism tools for returnees, including surveillance, criminal investigations, peace bonds, and the revoking of passports.Such measures are effective, Goodale told the Commons.“The security and police agencies of this country do an extraordinary job in identifying individuals that pose a risk to the public and taking the appropriate action to make sure that Canadians are safe.”last_img read more

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Ontarios teen royal wedding guest ready with dream dress

first_imgLONDON – Teenage royal wedding guest Faith Dickinson says she’s got her “dream dress” ready for the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle.The Peterborough, Ont., resident is among the throngs of royal fans who have flooded the town of Windsor west of London to celebrate the union at Windsor Castle on Saturday.But unlike most, the 15-year-old will watch the spectacle from the castle grounds, as one of seven youth associated with the Diana Award to receive a coveted spot outside St. George’s Chapel.Some 200 others from a range of charities are also invited onto the grounds, as well as more than 2,000 members of the public. Tens of thousands of other royal fans are expected to line the historic town’s winding streets.Dickinson expected she’ll have a prime view of the couple’s arrival, as well as their emergence from the ceremony as newlyweds.But her day will start early — she says she’ll have to dress and complete her makeup for an 8:30 a.m. arrival at the castle.With the wedding not set to begin until noon, and the couple’s procession through town not expected until 1 p.m., it’ll make for a long morning spent outside, the teen noted Friday.“But it’s all worth it,” Dickinson said, adding she’ll also get a chance to enter the chapel after the guests leave.“I love them, they’re a perfect couple and they do so much amazing charity work.”It’ll be a whirlwind trip for Dickinson, who arrived in London on Thursday, heads to Scotland on Sunday and returns to Canada on Wednesday.She’s still in school, after all, she points out.The Grade 10 student brought homework to tackle on the train to Edinburgh and back.“I have to get back to school — it’s exam season so I can’t miss too much,” said Dickinson, who brought math, history and science work.Nevertheless, she’s soaking up as much of her fairy tale trip as possible and plans to bring a camera to snap some prime shots of famous guests.And she gushed over her bespoke silk and lace dress by Ottawa designer Nora Pucci of the brand Zarucci, and a matching fascinator by Toronto milliner David Dunkley.“It’s a perfect outfit, my dream,” she said of the dress, in mauve.Dickinson said it was exactly one year ago that she met Prince Harry in London to receive a Diana Award for her charity work. Cuddles for Cancer provides blankets to cancer patients and veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder.“I would never have imagined that I would be back for his wedding.”last_img read more

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Dispute over Grabher licence plate heats up as NS man told to

first_imgHALIFAX – A Nova Scotia man fighting to have his last name — Grabher — reinstated on a licence plate says police have now forced him to remove an inactive Alberta plate from the front of his car.Lorne Grabher said he received a call from police Monday after a complaint was lodged against the personalized Alberta licence plate he had on the front of his car.Nova Scotia requires only one valid plate, at the rear, and drivers in the province often place inactive or novelty plates on the front of their vehicles.Grabher says police told him he would face a stiff penalty for driving with a fraudulent plate if he did not remove the Alberta plate, which had his last name on it in capitalized letters.The 69-year-old man said he feels he’s being unfairly targeted.“I’ve been red-flagged,” he said from his Dartmouth home, noting the large number of vehicles in the province that have inactive out-of-province plates on the front.Grabher received international attention after the Registry of Motor Vehicles revoked his personalized Nova Scotia plate bearing his last name, saying it was a “socially unacceptable slogan.”“The issue for me is where does anybody, especially the government, get the right to discriminate against somebody’s name,” he said. “The only place I can think of where they do stunts like that is if you live in a communist country.”The Justice Centre for Constitutional Freedoms is representing Grabher, and says the revocation infringes on his constitutional rights.The organization filed a notice of application with the provincial Supreme Court seeking to overturn the decision.A hearing on the matter scheduled for Wednesday was postponed to June 6 after a lawyer representing the province requested more time to “gather the names of witnesses” and “confirm instructions with my client.”Grabher called the legal dispute a waste of taxpayer dollars.“It’s my last name,” he said. “We’ve had this licence plate in my family for 27 years.”Grabher said his last name is a point of pride for his family and its Austrian-German heritage.In the early 1800s, Grabher’s great-great-grandfather made the journey from Austria to the United States, part of a wave of settlers.His grandfather then moved to Canada in 1890 and put down roots in Alberta.Grabher said his father joined the army at the age of 17, during the Second World War, and was sent to Cape Breton, where his family settled.He said revoking his personalized licence plate is foolish and offensive.Grabher said he is now using an alphanumeric licence plate on the rear of his car, and has removed the old Alberta plate from the front as requested by police.last_img read more

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Transportation Safety Board to release final report into Leviathan II capsize

first_imgVANCOUVER – The Transportation Safety Board’s final report into the deadly capsizing of a whale-watching vessel off Vancouver Island is expected to be released next month.An email from the board says its investigation report into the October 2015 incident involving the Leviathan II will be issued June 14.Six people died and all 27 aboard were thrown into the waters off Plover Reef north of Tofino when a large wave hit the side of the vessel.Safety board investigators have said most passengers and crew were on the top deck of the vessel’s port side when the 20-metre vessel rolled and capsized.Survivors described being thrown into the ocean without life jackets and grabbing hold of a single floating life ring while others reported swimming through oily water and rough seas to get away from the boat’s rotating propellers.At least 15 survivors and several family members of the six victims have filed lawsuits against the vessel’s owner, Jamie’s Whaling Station.last_img read more

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The Monday news briefing An ataglance survey of some top stories

first_imgHighlights from the news file for Monday, Oct. 16———AMID BACKLASH, LIBERALS TRIM SMALL-BIZ TAX: The Trudeau government took the first of several steps Monday to stanch the bleeding from a self-inflicted political wound, resurrecting a campaign promise to cut taxes for small businesses outraged by its controversial tax-reform proposals. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau promised to gradually trim the small-business tax rate to nine per cent by 2019, down from its current level of 10.5 per cent, and also to make further changes to the plan that triggered the angry backlash from entrepreneurs in the first place. Doctors, lawyers, accountants, shop owners, farmers, premiers and even some Liberal backbenchers have denounced the tax proposals, contending they’d hurt the very middle class Trudeau claims to be trying to help. In hope of calming critics, Trudeau also announced Monday he will abandon at least one of the tax-reform elements: changing the lifetime capital gains rule, which is an adjustment intended to avoid negative impacts on the intergenerational transfer of family businesses, like farms.———SOMALI-CANADIANS LEFT REELING AFTER BOMBING: Somali-Canadians say they’re in shock after a bomb blast killed hundreds of people in Mogadishu on Saturday, and they’re calling on the federal government to help those affected by the attack. More than 300 people were killed and nearly 400 others are injured, many badly burned, after the truck bombing on a crowded street in Somalia’s capital. Jibril Ibrahim, president of the Somali Canadian Cultural Society of Edmonton, says the country has been devastated by the attack and the Canadian government should be offering help. Ibrahim says the Canadian government should work to help get the wounded out of Mogadishu and into places where they can get adequate medical treatment. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has tweeted his condolences to the Somali-Canadian community and the family and friends of those who lost their lives in the attack, but Global Affairs did not immediately respond to a request for comment on whether the government would send increased aid to the region in the wake of the bombing.———PHARMACISTS WANT EXPANDED ROLE IN OPIOID CRISIS: The head of the BC Pharmacy Association says chronic opioid users in rural and remote communities should have access to supervised injectable treatment that is already available in the Vancouver area. Geraldine Vance says the overdose epidemic demands immediate involvement by community pharmacists and up to 20 pilot projects should be started in under-served parts of British Columbia. Vance says there’s already a pilot study in Vancouver to expand on injectable treatment provided at the city’s Crosstown clinic, where patients receive hydromorphone and pharmaceutical-grade heroin. She says that service needs to be expanded to areas where overdose deaths have increased dramatically, and pharmacists could help play a vital role in dispensing the drug and monitoring patients. Vance says her association has been in discussions with the BC Centre on Substance Use and the BC Centre for Disease Control since the spring about how pharmacists could be involved.———FAMILY OF INDIGENOUS GIRL FROZEN TO DEATH TESTIFIES: Family members of a 16-year-old Indigenous girl who was found frozen to death behind an auto body shop in Winnipeg say they do not want her death to be in vain. Relatives of Nicole Daniels were the first to testify as the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women opened four days of hearings in the Manitoba capital. Daniels was found face down in the snow in April 2009, the morning after, her family says, she had gone out with a middle-aged man she had met on a telephone chat line. An autopsy showed she had a high level of alcohol in her system and died from hypothermia. The police ruled out foul play. Her aunt, Joan Winning, says the teen’s clothes were undone, and that — along with other factors — leaves the family convinced that she was murdered. Nicole’s cousin, Isabel Daniels, told the hearing society sees Indigenous women as disposable and that has to change.———LOBLAW TO LAY OFF 500 PEOPLE FROM OFFICE JOBS: Loblaw Companies Ltd. says it is laying off 500 workers from its office operations. President Sarah Davis wrote in a memo to employees that some of the employees were informed Monday and many of the positions will be eliminated immediately. She said the business faces growing pressures from both new costs and competition, and remains committed to reducing costs and running efficiently. Davis said Loblaw is making major investments in omni-channel, financial services and other growing areas and expects to create hundreds of near-term jobs. Spokesman Kevin Groh said the job cuts will come from its offices around the country, including Calgary, Toronto, Winnipeg, Halifax and Montreal. He said Loblaw employs about 200,000 people across Canada.———U.S. SEEKS END TO SUPPLY MANAGEMENT AS NAFTA TALKS CONTINUE: The United States has requested a complete end to Canada’s supply management system for dairy, poultry, eggs and turkey within a decade. Two sources tell The Canadian Press the request came last night at the NAFTA talks. One says the request came with an initial phase-in period of five per cent more market access per year. Both say the goal would be to end all quotas and tariffs within 10 years. They say the Canadian government is calling the idea a non-starter. The federal Liberal government has promised to maintain the protected system for supply-managed products like dairy, arguing that the U.S. maintains numerous support programs to support its own farmers. The nearly completed NAFTA round in Washington has featured a series of aggressive demands from the U.S. that have prompted fears about whether a deal is possible. The U.S. has made tough requests on auto parts, dispute-resolution mechanisms, Buy American rules, and on a so-called sunset clause that could result in NAFTA ending within five years.———ACCUSED KIDNAPPER SAYS HE WAS COERCED: One of the men accused of kidnapping Amanda Lindhout says he was forced to travel to a house outside Mogadishu where she was being held in August 2008. Testifying Monday in Ontario Superior Court, Ali Omar Ader said he had no role in planning to seize Lindhout, who was working as a journalist in Somalia. Ader said he was suddenly approached by men who told him to accompany them, or else he would die. Ader, a 40-year-old Somalian national, has pleaded not guilty to a criminal charge of hostage-taking for his alleged role as a negotiator and translator. Lindhout, a native of Red Deer, Alta., and Australian photographer Nigel Brennan were abducted by armed men while working on a story, the beginning of 15 months in captivity. Both were freed in November 2009.———HALF A MILLION STUDENTS AFFECTED BY ONTARIO COLLEGE STRIKE: Classes were cancelled for about half a million students in Ontario on Monday as faculty at the province’s colleges went on strike. The labour dispute involving more than 12,000 professors, instructors, counsellors and librarians began late Sunday after the two sides couldn’t resolve their differences by a deadline of 12:01 a.m. Monday. Both sides say there are currently no talks scheduled to end the dispute that involves Ontario’s 24 colleges. The Ontario Public Services Employees Union says it is up to the College Employer Council, which bargains for the colleges, to re-start talks. The union presented a proposal Saturday night that called for the number of full-time faculty to match the number of faculty members on contract but the colleges say it would add more than $250 million costs each year. More than 45,000 people have signed a petition calling for a tuition reimbursement for each day lost to a strike. Matthews would not comment on that idea or the possibility of eventual back-to-work legislation, saying she wouldn’t discuss hypotheticals.———POLLEY SPEAKS OUT ABOUT EXPERIENCE WITH WEINSTEIN: Canadian film and TV star Sarah Polley says Harvey Weinstein once suggested they have a “close relationship” in order to advance her career, but she turned him down. In an op-ed in the New York Times over the weekend, the Oscar-nominated actress-turned-filmmaker wrote the encounter happened when she was 19 years old and starring in the 1999 Miramax film “Guinevere.” The Toronto native says she was doing a photo shoot for the film when the fallen Hollywood producer summoned her into his office. When a publicist insisted she accompany the actress to the meeting and assured her she wouldn’t leave her side, Polley says she “knew everything I needed to know in that moment, and I was grateful.” Polley says Weinstein told her if she had a “close relationship” with him, like the one he had with a famous star a few years her senior, she could have a similarly successful career. But Polley told him she wasn’t very ambitious or interested in acting and indicated that he was wasting his time. The op-ed was published as Weinstein faces mounting allegations of sexual harassment and assault in a saga that first broke in the Times.———GM WORKERS AT CAMI APPROVE DEAL: Workers at General Motors’ CAMI plant are ending their four-week strike after accepting a new contract Monday that includes higher compensation, financial penalties against GM for future layoffs and the preservation of production shifts. The contract proposal was hammered out last week and Unifor, which represents 2,500 of the 2,800 workers affected at the plant in Ingersoll, Ont., had recommended the deal be accepted. The union said almost 86 per cent of production workers and 79 per cent of tradesworkers approved the contract. About 2,400 workers voted. The automaker threatened last week to shift more production to Mexico if a settlement wasn’t reached swiftly and the two sides agreed to a deal on Friday. Workers will receive two per cent wage increases in the first and fourth year of the deal, a $6,000 signing bonus and annual payments of $2,000 each Christmas. The automaker will also be forced to pay $300 million for any future job cuts. About 400 workers are currently on layoff. Retirement packages will be offered to entice about 100 workers to leave their positions for laid-off colleagues.———last_img read more

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The Thursday news briefing An ataglance survey of some top stories

first_imgHighlights from the news file for Thursday, Oct. 26———POTENTIAL CYBER ATTACKS WORRY CENTRAL BANK GOVERNOR: Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz says the threat of a cyberattack is perhaps the scenario that troubles him the most. Poloz told The Canadian Press on Thursday that the financial system will get through economic turbulence. But he said he is unsure what the fallout would be if there was a cyberattack against the financial system. The central bank warned Canadians in June that the country’s banks are vulnerable to a cascading series of cyberattacks.———FEW SEX ASSAULTS RESULT IN CONVICTION: Statistics Canada says only about 12 per cent of sexual assaults reported to police led to a conviction. The agency looked at sexual assault figures between 2009 and 2014. StatsCan says the figures only cover the complaints that police validated and don’t include complaints deemed unfounded.———PARENTS ASKING DOCTORS ABOUT MEDICALLY ASSISTED DEATH FOR TERMINALLY ILL CHILDREN: A survey by the Canadian Paediatric Society says parents are increasingly asking their doctors about the option of seeking medically assisted death for children who have progressive terminal illness or intractable pain. Federal legislation brought in last year allowed eligible adults the right to seek out assisted death in cases of incurable illness or intolerable suffering, but the situation regarding minors is still being reviewed. Dr. Dawn Davies of the pediatric society says the findings show the medical community should start thinking about issues involving assisted death for minors.———MILLIONS OF COMPENSATION GIVEN TO TORTURE VICTIMS: Over $31 million in federal compensation has been paid to three Canadians who were tortured in Syria. The Trudeau government announced this spring that it had settled long-standing lawsuits filed by Abdullah Almalki, Ahmad El Maati and Muayyed Nureddin over the federal role in their ordeals. Recently released federal documents note a $31.25-million payment to three unidentified individuals and The Canadian Press has confirmed it refers to the settlement. An inquiry concluded that Canadian officials contributed to the torture of Almalki, El Maati and Nureddin by sharing information with foreign agencies.———MORNEAU TO DONATE SOME SHARE EARNINGS TO CHARITY: Finance Minister Bill Morneau says he won’t keep any money he makes as a result of any increase in the value of shares in his family business since he was elected two years ago. Morneau said on Thursday that he’ll give the money to charity. Morneau plans to sell all of his roughly one million shares in Morneau Shepell, which are worth an estimated $21 million, and put all his other considerable assets into a blind trust. Morneau has been under fire in Parliament for failing to divest his shares earlier because the opposition contends he is in a conflict of interest.———NEW SCREENING IN EFFECT FOR CANADIANS TRAVELLING INTO THE U.S.: New security guidelines are in effect for Canadian travellers flying into the U.S., but the airlines are saying little about what the procedures involve. The U.S. government said earlier this year that there would be increased screening of passengers and their cellphones and other electronic devices. There would also be more security around planes and in passenger areas. Air Canada says all of its flights to the U.S. go through preclearance in Canadian airports so passengers will encounter the new screening before leaving Canada.———IRVING ORDERED TO PAY IN LAC MEGANTIC DISASTER: Irving Oil has been ordered to pay $4 million after pleading guilty to 34 counts stemming from the 2013 rail disaster in Lac Megantic, Que., that killed 47 people. Irving pleaded guilty to a number of charges under the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act. Transport Canada and the RCMP said Irving had not complied with all applicable safety requirements by not classifying the crude oil being carried by trains as a dangerous good. A government statement said Irving did not adequately train its employees in the transportation of dangerous goods.———U.S. DECLARES OPIOID CRISIS A NATIONAL PUBLIC HEALTH EMERGENCY: The acting American health and human services secretary has officially declared the opioid crisis a nationwide public health emergency, as requested by President Donald Trump. Eric D. Hargan says in a statement that Trump “has made this national crisis a top priority since he took office in January.”———HALIFAX POLITICIAN SAYS THE WORD MARIJUANA IS RACIST: A Halifax city councillor says he won’t use the word marijuana because it’s racist. Shawn Cleary says in the early 1900s during the criminalization of cannabis in the U.S., “marijuana” was used to demonize marginalized communities, namely Mexicans. Cleary says he’s decided to stop using the word. His tweets prompted intense debate on social media with some people thanking Cleary for informing them and others questioning the validity of his comments.———GREY CUP SOLD OUT: It might be hard to come by a ticket to the Grey Cup. The CFL championship is sold out despite the fact the game is a month away. Capacity at Ottawa’s TD Place will be increased from 24,000 to 36,000, with the addition of temporary stands in both end zones, to meet the increased demand.———last_img read more

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Indigenous womans grave site brings pilgrims to former BC residential school

first_imgFRASER LAKE, B.C. – Rose Prince arrived at the former Lejac Residential School in British Columbia when she was six years old and never left.Her grave site on the grounds of the Catholic-run institution at Fraser Lake is all that remains of the school, but it brings Indigenous and non-Indigenous visitors on pilgrimages every year seeking spiritual and physical healing.Prince was known for her devout faith, compassion, humility and self-sacrifice. But it’s the almost unreal circumstances surrounding her death and claims of healing that prompts the pilgrimage to her grave every July.Her acclaim has gained the attention of the Vatican as a possible candidate for sainthood.Prince was 34 when she died of tuberculosis in 1949. It has been reported that Prince’s body did not cool after she died at the former St. John’s Hospital in nearby Vanderhoof.When her gravesite was disturbed by construction two years later, her opened casket revealed her body hadn’t decayed.“The workers were amazed to find her body and clothing perfectly preserved,” says a brochure produced by the Prince George diocese.“They found her body in perfect condition. She seemed to be transparent and looked as if she were sleeping. There was ‘just a tiny bit of a smile on her face.’ A bouquet of withered flowers was on her chest.”Gravediggers, nuns and priests from the residential school reported a floral scent in the air. Only the bouquet of flowers she was buried with had wilted.Among Catholics, “incorruption” of the body is believed to be a sign of a life of holiness and reflects the victory of Christ over death.Grand Chief Ed John said he can’t confirm miracles but has experienced an unexplained phenomenon at Prince’s grave.John, who spent seven years at the Lejac school, said he often visits Prince’s grave to pray and seek strength from her spirit. Many Indigenous people across B.C. already consider Prince a saint, he said, but it could take the church decades or more to decide.“She’s a special person in our peoples’ history and we revere her in many respects,” said John, the leader of the First Nations Summit, one of B.C.’s largest Indigenous organizations. “We’ve heard stories of people who have had miraculous cures. I understand the church has taken steps to document that.”He can’t logically explain what he felt during one visit to the grave, but John said he experienced her presence.“I was there and I get out of my vehicle and I’m walking towards the site of her burial and all you could smell were roses,” he said. “I couldn’t believe it. It was early enough that there wasn’t really any flowers out there yet. I can’t make heads or tails of that.”Jack Lacerte was 10 years old when he saw Prince’s body after the coffin opened in 1951 as he helped his father, who was a caretaker at the school.Lacerte died three years ago and was the last surviving person who saw the body, but his wife Shirley said her husband — one of Canada’s first Indigenous RCMP officers — never changed his story.The pilgrimages to the Lejac school site, which started in 1990, bring people from across Western Canada and the North, said Rev. Vince James of St. Andrew’s Parish in Fraser Lake, located about 160 kilometres west of Prince George.Fraser Lake miner Nick Loza told the Vancouver Sun in the 1990s he became pain free after soil from Prince’s grave was mixed with holy water and rubbed on his damaged spine.A letter signed by Loza describes the experience he had on Aug. 13, 1991: “The afternoon of August 13th, Father Jules Goulet anointed me and prayed for me through the intercession of Rose Prince. Since the anointing I just keep getting better. After three days I was able to walk again having to endure little pain. I was also able to have a full night’s rest every night.”James said he sees the pilgrimages as “people gathering to share their faith with each other.”“I believe that Rose is a great soul and a holy woman. Some people claim she, through her intercession, they’re healed physically or spiritually.”He said the church moves slowly on matters of sainthood, but “Rome knows about Rose. We’ve sent information over that we had.”James said a Vatican official has visited the parish about Prince.The Vatican’s five steps to sainthood involve waiting five years after the person’s death, becoming a servant of God, showing proof of a life of heroic virtue, verifying miracles and canonization.James said the pilgrimages are emotional gatherings because Prince brings those wanting to share their faith, but many wounded by their residential school experiences also arrive at the former school, which was torn down in 1976.“They say, I hated the place,” he said. “My grandmother went here. I’ve come here not to be happy, but now that I’ve experienced the weekend I feel good about it. I haven’t forgiven. I’ve got a lot of pain in my heart.”Among the school’s darkest chapters was the death of four boys in 1937. Ranging in age from seven to nine, the boys froze to death in January 1937 on Fraser Lake after running away from the school in -29 C temperatures.Prince was at the school when the boys died.“They were found huddled together on the ice the next morning,” said John. “It’s just tragic. It’s heartbreaking for us to see it now.”He said the boys were trying to get home, much the same as Chanie Wenjack, the Indigenous youth who died trying to return to his family from a residential school in Ontario. Wenjack’s journey became the subject of an illustrated book and recording by the Tragically Hip’s Gord Downie, who died this year.Wilma Pattison said she considers her aunt a saint who lived a devout life where worldly things did not matter.Prince died when Pattison was three years old, but she’ll never forget walking into St. Andrew’s Parish in Fraser Lake for her first time almost 50 years ago.Minutes after entering the church, Pattison said Sister Mary Ann gave her a greeting card made by Prince. The card was dated July 1948, the year before she died, and was addressed to the nun.Sister Mary Ann said she vowed to give the card to the first person from Prince’s family to come to the church.Pattison says the card is signed, “With Love from Rose Prince.”“May all the days of all the years that God has still in store be filled with every joy and grace to bless you more and more,” said one of the handwritten verses.last_img read more

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Softball rule changing for transgender players after Edmonton coach cries foul

first_imgEDMONTON – Businessman Pete Howell was preparing to coach another season of community softball when his stepdaughter invited a transgender friend to join her on the McLeod Royals.Sports officials told him the 15-year-old had to provide medical proof of gender reassignment before she would be allowed on the Edmonton girls team.Howell was shocked.“I have three kids I signed up in the same league and they weren’t singled out. They weren’t asked questions like that,” he said. “Technically not all kids can play — as much as they talk about it — without being put to the side and having to jump through a bunch of hoops.“We’re talking community level here, not the Olympics.”Howell complained about the rule and said other parents also voiced concerns. During the controversy, the girl decided she no longer wanted to join the team.Then Howell quit as coach.“I just said, ‘You know what? Good luck, I don’t want to be part of this.’”Hugh Mitchener, chief executive officer with Softball Canada in Ottawa, said it wasn’t until the Edmonton coach cried foul that the organization learned its policy on transgender players was outdated and illegal. The federal government added gender identity and expression to the Canadian Human Rights Code last year.“I checked with our lawyer and he said, ‘Yep. It’s no longer compliant. You need to change it,’” said Mitchener.“So that’s what we quickly are doing.”A draft of the new policy, which has yet to be approved by a board of directors, allows players to join the team they self-identify with, he said.Mitchener said some provincial softball groups which had adopted the old national policy, including Softball Alberta, are being notified that a new rule will be ready in time for the upcoming season.“I regret that it’s inconvenienced anybody,” Mitchener said. “I expect that this will make it a lot more comfortable for transgender players to compete in softball.”A spokesperson with Softball Alberta could not be reached for comment.Tom Clooney, president of the Edmonton Youth Softball Association, said his group trusted national and provincial softball groups to stay on top of policies and the law.The Edmonton association is talking with lawyers and LGBTQ community associations to craft a new transgender policy that ensures “all participants feel safe, accepted and have fun,” he said.last_img read more

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Senate fixes vibrating camera

first_imgOTTAWA — Viewers won’t have to adjust their television sets anymore as the Senate says it has fixed a problem with one of their brand new cameras vibrating during broadcasts.The Canadian Press reported last week that the Senate was forced to bring in a special engineer to deal with wobbly cameras as the Red Chamber started broadcasting for the very first time.While the House of Commons has been televised for more than 40 years, the Senate has only started to broadcast meetings in its main chamber.The decision coincided with the upper chamber being temporarily relocated into a former train station in downtown Ottawa while Centre Block is being renovated.However, “natural vibrations and inherent movements” endemic to older structures had created problems with one camera in particular that wouldn’t stop shaking.Senate spokeswoman Alison Korn says the problem was finally fixed late Friday, meaning Canadians won’t need to take anymore Gravol before tuning in. The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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How the police could be tracking your phone

first_imgIt’s a relatively secretive piece of technology. So secretive, that authorities don’t even like to admit they use it. But the police are now using it to gather data from cellphones in Canadian cities. What can they do with that data? Depends on who you ask. Should you be worried? They say no, and privacy experts disagree—so in other words, it’s another story about what we should expect when we walk around in public.What are they collecting? How does it help solve crimes? What rights does the public have to their smartphones data signature? What’s the logical extension of increased use of this technology? And, for the crimes it’s supposed to solve, does it work?GUEST: Kate Allen, Science and Technology reporter, Toronto StarAudio Playerhttp://media.blubrry.com/thebigstory/s/radio.pmd.rogersdigitalmedia.com/podcasts/thebigstory/tbs_03292019.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on iTunes or Google Play.You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.last_img read more

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