Category: qulhrhtg

Nova Scotia British Columbia to Share Marine Renewable Development Information

first_imgThe provinces of Nova Scotia and British Columbia have signed a Memorandum of Understanding that will encourage greater collaboration on tidal energy research and policy development. The memorandum, signed by Energy Minister Charlie Parker and British Columbia Energy, Mines and Natural Gas Minister Rich Coleman, will help advance extracting renewable energy from offshore wind, waves and tides, as well as river currents. It was signed during the federal, provincial and territorial Energy and Mines Ministers’ meeting in Charlottetown. “This is an important step in supporting small-scale tidal energy projects that could be developed near rural communities, providing community and economic benefits in both provinces and in other parts of Canada,” said Mr. Parker. “Partnerships and collaboration like this one will advance the industry in Nova Scotia and help ensure a consistent regulatory framework across the country.” “By working together, British Columbia and Nova Scotia can support marine renewable energy research and development and provide regulatory certainty to investors and project developers by developing a clear regulatory and permitting pathway for projects,” said Mr. Coleman. “British Columbia and Nova Scotia have coastal resources that include wind, tidal and wave energy. There are opportunities to provide power to coastal and First Nations communities, many currently served by diesel power.” Nova Scotia is a world leader in in-stream tidal technology development with the Fundy Ocean Research Centre for Energy in the Bay of Fundy. Research is also being done by the Offshore Energy Research Association of Nova Scotia on tidal energy impacts, environmental affects and monitoring. In May, Nova Scotia released its Marine Renewable Electricity Plan to guide ocean energy resources development into affordable clean, renewable electricity, and use that to build exports. British Columbian companies have developed innovative in-stream turbines and wave-energy converters to generate electricity from ocean as well as river currents. Many B.C. sites are being examined for ocean energy potential. One pilot project has produced electricity from tidal currents, while three others aim to show innovative wave and tidal energy technology in the waters around Vancouver Island. All jurisdictions involved in marine renewable energy, including Nova Scotia, B.C., the U.S. and the U.K., support incremental development to build technical knowledge and allow research on ecological impacts, and community and public engagement.last_img read more

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The Monday news briefing An ataglance survey of some top stories

first_imgHighlights from the news file for Monday, Oct. 16———AMID BACKLASH, LIBERALS TRIM SMALL-BIZ TAX: The Trudeau government took the first of several steps Monday to stanch the bleeding from a self-inflicted political wound, resurrecting a campaign promise to cut taxes for small businesses outraged by its controversial tax-reform proposals. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau promised to gradually trim the small-business tax rate to nine per cent by 2019, down from its current level of 10.5 per cent, and also to make further changes to the plan that triggered the angry backlash from entrepreneurs in the first place. Doctors, lawyers, accountants, shop owners, farmers, premiers and even some Liberal backbenchers have denounced the tax proposals, contending they’d hurt the very middle class Trudeau claims to be trying to help. In hope of calming critics, Trudeau also announced Monday he will abandon at least one of the tax-reform elements: changing the lifetime capital gains rule, which is an adjustment intended to avoid negative impacts on the intergenerational transfer of family businesses, like farms.———SOMALI-CANADIANS LEFT REELING AFTER BOMBING: Somali-Canadians say they’re in shock after a bomb blast killed hundreds of people in Mogadishu on Saturday, and they’re calling on the federal government to help those affected by the attack. More than 300 people were killed and nearly 400 others are injured, many badly burned, after the truck bombing on a crowded street in Somalia’s capital. Jibril Ibrahim, president of the Somali Canadian Cultural Society of Edmonton, says the country has been devastated by the attack and the Canadian government should be offering help. Ibrahim says the Canadian government should work to help get the wounded out of Mogadishu and into places where they can get adequate medical treatment. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has tweeted his condolences to the Somali-Canadian community and the family and friends of those who lost their lives in the attack, but Global Affairs did not immediately respond to a request for comment on whether the government would send increased aid to the region in the wake of the bombing.———PHARMACISTS WANT EXPANDED ROLE IN OPIOID CRISIS: The head of the BC Pharmacy Association says chronic opioid users in rural and remote communities should have access to supervised injectable treatment that is already available in the Vancouver area. Geraldine Vance says the overdose epidemic demands immediate involvement by community pharmacists and up to 20 pilot projects should be started in under-served parts of British Columbia. Vance says there’s already a pilot study in Vancouver to expand on injectable treatment provided at the city’s Crosstown clinic, where patients receive hydromorphone and pharmaceutical-grade heroin. She says that service needs to be expanded to areas where overdose deaths have increased dramatically, and pharmacists could help play a vital role in dispensing the drug and monitoring patients. Vance says her association has been in discussions with the BC Centre on Substance Use and the BC Centre for Disease Control since the spring about how pharmacists could be involved.———FAMILY OF INDIGENOUS GIRL FROZEN TO DEATH TESTIFIES: Family members of a 16-year-old Indigenous girl who was found frozen to death behind an auto body shop in Winnipeg say they do not want her death to be in vain. Relatives of Nicole Daniels were the first to testify as the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women opened four days of hearings in the Manitoba capital. Daniels was found face down in the snow in April 2009, the morning after, her family says, she had gone out with a middle-aged man she had met on a telephone chat line. An autopsy showed she had a high level of alcohol in her system and died from hypothermia. The police ruled out foul play. Her aunt, Joan Winning, says the teen’s clothes were undone, and that — along with other factors — leaves the family convinced that she was murdered. Nicole’s cousin, Isabel Daniels, told the hearing society sees Indigenous women as disposable and that has to change.———LOBLAW TO LAY OFF 500 PEOPLE FROM OFFICE JOBS: Loblaw Companies Ltd. says it is laying off 500 workers from its office operations. President Sarah Davis wrote in a memo to employees that some of the employees were informed Monday and many of the positions will be eliminated immediately. She said the business faces growing pressures from both new costs and competition, and remains committed to reducing costs and running efficiently. Davis said Loblaw is making major investments in omni-channel, financial services and other growing areas and expects to create hundreds of near-term jobs. Spokesman Kevin Groh said the job cuts will come from its offices around the country, including Calgary, Toronto, Winnipeg, Halifax and Montreal. He said Loblaw employs about 200,000 people across Canada.———U.S. SEEKS END TO SUPPLY MANAGEMENT AS NAFTA TALKS CONTINUE: The United States has requested a complete end to Canada’s supply management system for dairy, poultry, eggs and turkey within a decade. Two sources tell The Canadian Press the request came last night at the NAFTA talks. One says the request came with an initial phase-in period of five per cent more market access per year. Both say the goal would be to end all quotas and tariffs within 10 years. They say the Canadian government is calling the idea a non-starter. The federal Liberal government has promised to maintain the protected system for supply-managed products like dairy, arguing that the U.S. maintains numerous support programs to support its own farmers. The nearly completed NAFTA round in Washington has featured a series of aggressive demands from the U.S. that have prompted fears about whether a deal is possible. The U.S. has made tough requests on auto parts, dispute-resolution mechanisms, Buy American rules, and on a so-called sunset clause that could result in NAFTA ending within five years.———ACCUSED KIDNAPPER SAYS HE WAS COERCED: One of the men accused of kidnapping Amanda Lindhout says he was forced to travel to a house outside Mogadishu where she was being held in August 2008. Testifying Monday in Ontario Superior Court, Ali Omar Ader said he had no role in planning to seize Lindhout, who was working as a journalist in Somalia. Ader said he was suddenly approached by men who told him to accompany them, or else he would die. Ader, a 40-year-old Somalian national, has pleaded not guilty to a criminal charge of hostage-taking for his alleged role as a negotiator and translator. Lindhout, a native of Red Deer, Alta., and Australian photographer Nigel Brennan were abducted by armed men while working on a story, the beginning of 15 months in captivity. Both were freed in November 2009.———HALF A MILLION STUDENTS AFFECTED BY ONTARIO COLLEGE STRIKE: Classes were cancelled for about half a million students in Ontario on Monday as faculty at the province’s colleges went on strike. The labour dispute involving more than 12,000 professors, instructors, counsellors and librarians began late Sunday after the two sides couldn’t resolve their differences by a deadline of 12:01 a.m. Monday. Both sides say there are currently no talks scheduled to end the dispute that involves Ontario’s 24 colleges. The Ontario Public Services Employees Union says it is up to the College Employer Council, which bargains for the colleges, to re-start talks. The union presented a proposal Saturday night that called for the number of full-time faculty to match the number of faculty members on contract but the colleges say it would add more than $250 million costs each year. More than 45,000 people have signed a petition calling for a tuition reimbursement for each day lost to a strike. Matthews would not comment on that idea or the possibility of eventual back-to-work legislation, saying she wouldn’t discuss hypotheticals.———POLLEY SPEAKS OUT ABOUT EXPERIENCE WITH WEINSTEIN: Canadian film and TV star Sarah Polley says Harvey Weinstein once suggested they have a “close relationship” in order to advance her career, but she turned him down. In an op-ed in the New York Times over the weekend, the Oscar-nominated actress-turned-filmmaker wrote the encounter happened when she was 19 years old and starring in the 1999 Miramax film “Guinevere.” The Toronto native says she was doing a photo shoot for the film when the fallen Hollywood producer summoned her into his office. When a publicist insisted she accompany the actress to the meeting and assured her she wouldn’t leave her side, Polley says she “knew everything I needed to know in that moment, and I was grateful.” Polley says Weinstein told her if she had a “close relationship” with him, like the one he had with a famous star a few years her senior, she could have a similarly successful career. But Polley told him she wasn’t very ambitious or interested in acting and indicated that he was wasting his time. The op-ed was published as Weinstein faces mounting allegations of sexual harassment and assault in a saga that first broke in the Times.———GM WORKERS AT CAMI APPROVE DEAL: Workers at General Motors’ CAMI plant are ending their four-week strike after accepting a new contract Monday that includes higher compensation, financial penalties against GM for future layoffs and the preservation of production shifts. The contract proposal was hammered out last week and Unifor, which represents 2,500 of the 2,800 workers affected at the plant in Ingersoll, Ont., had recommended the deal be accepted. The union said almost 86 per cent of production workers and 79 per cent of tradesworkers approved the contract. About 2,400 workers voted. The automaker threatened last week to shift more production to Mexico if a settlement wasn’t reached swiftly and the two sides agreed to a deal on Friday. Workers will receive two per cent wage increases in the first and fourth year of the deal, a $6,000 signing bonus and annual payments of $2,000 each Christmas. The automaker will also be forced to pay $300 million for any future job cuts. About 400 workers are currently on layoff. Retirement packages will be offered to entice about 100 workers to leave their positions for laid-off colleagues.———last_img read more

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Softball rule changing for transgender players after Edmonton coach cries foul

first_imgEDMONTON – Businessman Pete Howell was preparing to coach another season of community softball when his stepdaughter invited a transgender friend to join her on the McLeod Royals.Sports officials told him the 15-year-old had to provide medical proof of gender reassignment before she would be allowed on the Edmonton girls team.Howell was shocked.“I have three kids I signed up in the same league and they weren’t singled out. They weren’t asked questions like that,” he said. “Technically not all kids can play — as much as they talk about it — without being put to the side and having to jump through a bunch of hoops.“We’re talking community level here, not the Olympics.”Howell complained about the rule and said other parents also voiced concerns. During the controversy, the girl decided she no longer wanted to join the team.Then Howell quit as coach.“I just said, ‘You know what? Good luck, I don’t want to be part of this.’”Hugh Mitchener, chief executive officer with Softball Canada in Ottawa, said it wasn’t until the Edmonton coach cried foul that the organization learned its policy on transgender players was outdated and illegal. The federal government added gender identity and expression to the Canadian Human Rights Code last year.“I checked with our lawyer and he said, ‘Yep. It’s no longer compliant. You need to change it,’” said Mitchener.“So that’s what we quickly are doing.”A draft of the new policy, which has yet to be approved by a board of directors, allows players to join the team they self-identify with, he said.Mitchener said some provincial softball groups which had adopted the old national policy, including Softball Alberta, are being notified that a new rule will be ready in time for the upcoming season.“I regret that it’s inconvenienced anybody,” Mitchener said. “I expect that this will make it a lot more comfortable for transgender players to compete in softball.”A spokesperson with Softball Alberta could not be reached for comment.Tom Clooney, president of the Edmonton Youth Softball Association, said his group trusted national and provincial softball groups to stay on top of policies and the law.The Edmonton association is talking with lawyers and LGBTQ community associations to craft a new transgender policy that ensures “all participants feel safe, accepted and have fun,” he said.last_img read more

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Sean Penn Awarded Red Cross International Humanitarian Service Award

first_imgThe American Red Cross presented Sean Penn its International Humanitarian Service Award at a ceremony on October 24, 2012.The award recognizes an individual or group whose work exemplifies or inspires the humanitarian values of human dignity, respect, compassion and the protection and assistance implied in the Fundamental Principles of the global Red Cross and Red Crescent network.Penn was chosen because of his tireless work in Haiti since the catastrophic earthquake on January 12, 2010. Shortly after learning of the quake, Penn established the J/P Haitian Relief Organization (J/P HRO), with the goal to help lift the nation of Haiti out of the rubble and give the Haitian people a better future. Earlier this year, Penn was named Ambassador at Large for Haiti by President Michel Martelly. Penn is the first non-Haitian to take on this role.J/P HRO has become a leader in Haiti across multiple sectors seeking to improve living conditions in camps and surrounding neighborhoods by clearing rubble, and providing medical services, education and enrichment programs, housing construction and neighborhood redevelopment. J/P HRO is dedicated to saving lives and bringing sustainable programs to the Haitian people quickly and effectively.“Many people – both famous and not famous – generously gave their time and support for the people of Haiti in the days following the earthquake. What sets Ambassador Penn apart is his sustained dedication over the past two and a half years to improving the conditions for Haitians affected by the devastating earthquake,” said David Meltzer, Senior Vice President, International Services, American Red Cross. “He continues to raise funds and attention for Haiti, has spent months in camps and communities working directly with beneficiaries, and consistently advocates on behalf of Haitians with the highest levels of government, civil society and media to improve people’s lives.”Penn and the American Red Cross worked together in the early days following the outbreak of cholera to offload and deliver medical supplies and equipment. He personally intervened with the Government of Haiti on behalf of the American Red Cross, and he has publicly spoken in support of American Red Cross relief and recovery efforts in Haiti.Penn, a two time Academy Award winning actor, a film writer, producer and director, is committed to the multiple social causes and has received numerous honors and awards for his efforts. He most recently was presented with the 2012 Peace Summit Award at the 12th World Summit of Nobel Peace Laureates.The Red Cross also presented two other awards that evening. The Harriman Award for Distinguished Volunteer Service was presented to Deborah MacSwain and Elaine M. Lyerly, for their dedication and commitment to the mission of American Red Cross. The Susan Hassmiller Nursing Award was presented to the American Red Cross, Southern Minnesota Region for their nurse leadership pilot program.Source:Red Crosslast_img read more

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Vijender Gupta slams Delhi govt for not fulfilling promises

first_imgNew Delhi: The Leader of Opposition in Delhi Assembly, Vijender Gupta, on Sunday issued a statement claiming that his inspections of foot-over-bridges that were supposed to be completed years ago have shown that the Delhi government’s incompetence in fulfilling their promises.With poll dates drawing closer, Gupta went on a full offensive, accusing the AAP-led government in the Capital of being “useless” and blaming other forces for their flaws. The senior BJP leader claimed to have inspected foot-over-bridges that were supposed to be constructed by the Kejriwal government at Mukarba Chowk, Nirankari Samagam, Jahangirpuri, and Jagatpur. Also Read – After eight years, businessman arrested for kidnap & murderIn a statement, Gupta said that the only reason for construction on these bridges to be stalled was callousness displayed by the Delhi government regarding this matter. Gupta further went on to say that the construction of unfinished bridges does not require full-statehood, hence Kejriwal “has no excuse to blame the Central government or BJP for not allowing him to work.” In addition, Gupta claimed that the AAP government’s apparent inaction has led the people of Delhi to realise that BJP must come to power in the upcoming election. “The people have now made up their minds that they will teach them (AAP) a lesson in the coming Lok Sabha elections,” he said. In a tweet tagging the Chief Minister, Gupta also asked him to answer for the delay in constructing these bridges.last_img read more

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Egypt officer killed in clashes with wanted militants

first_imgCAIRO- An Egyptian police officer was shot dead north of Cairo on Thursday while on a mission to arrest militants suspected of assassinating a senior security official, the interior ministry said.Captain Ahmed Samer Mahmoud was killed at dawn in an operation in the Nile Delta town of Qulubiya when a team of special forces exchanged gunfire with militants, the ministry said.The team was chasing “terrorist elements” wanted for the murder of Lieutenant Colonel Mohamed Mabruk, it said in a statement, adding that two arrests were made. Mabruk, an officer involved in the crackdown against Islamists and members of the Muslim Brotherhood to which ousted president Mohamed Morsi belonged, was shot dead on Sunday in Cairo.A Sinai-based group linked to Al-Qaeda, Ansar Beit al-Maqdis, said its militants had gunned him down.Militant groups such as Ansar Beit al-Maqdis have escalated their attacks since the ouster of Morsi and have expanded to targeting security forces outside the restive Sinai Peninsula.The group had previously claimed bombing the interior minister’s convoy in a failed assassination attempt in September.Egypt’s new military-installed authorities are engaged in a crackdown on Islamist supporters of Morsi.More than 1,000 people have been killed in clashes with police since his ouster in July, and thousands have been arrested.last_img read more

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Fintech challenge pushing big banks into cutting fees and offering new options

OTTAWA — Technology firms have turned several industries on their head. The way people buy books, hail a ride home from the bar or find a room for the night while on vacation have all changed.And now financial technology or fintech firms are turning their sights on the banking industry, but Canada’s big banks aren’t going to give up their dominant position without a fight.Joanna Rotenberg, head of personal wealth management at BMO Financial Group, says the needs of customers are shifting and clients are seeking out digital tools to access and manage their money.Once touted as world’s soundest, Canadian banks are falling behind global peers on a key strength gaugeIn response, earlier this year the Bank of Montreal launched its SmartFolio investment service, which offers a professionally managed portfolio online for a low fee.“It’s for clients who want support from human professionals,” Rotenberg said. “It’s not a robot behind the scenes, but people who want to be able to access that digitally versus needing the hand-holding and face-to-face support.”The BMO offering comes as companies like Wealthsimple, Nest Wealth and ModernAdvisor look to take a bite out of the big players by making easy-to-open accounts online and cheaper by using exchange-traded funds.Rotenberg says it has been more than just digital-savvy millennials opening accounts with the new BMO service, adding that it has attracted the attention of a wide range of clients in both age and amount of savings they have to invest.“You can’t stereotype people in terms of who is interested. It really is about people who are looking for something that they can use on their smartphone, but they are going to get the money management support that they need,” she said.And it isn’t just investing where the big banks are fighting off new competitors. Retail banking, long the bedrock of the big banks, is seeing new challengers offering basic banking services to Canadians who have long complained about the fees they pay.You can’t stereotype people in terms of who is interested. It really is about people who are looking for something that they can use on their smartphoneOnline banks like EQ Bank, which is backed by Equitable Bank, and Zag Bank, which is supported by Desjardins Group, have launched with promises of lower fees and high interest rates on deposits as well as apps to help people manage their money.Among the big banks, Scotiabank and its Tangerine brand is the largest player in the online banking business. The former ING Bank of Canada operations, which Scotiabank acquired in 2012, was one of the first online banks in the country.But the other big banks have also been upping their game in a bid to remain competitive by cutting fees and making it easier to open accounts and manage money online.The Royal Bank has started offering unlimited free Interac e-transfer payments for personal chequing accounts, while CIBC is offering an account with a flexible fee that varies depending on how many transactions customers make. TD Bank has launched a real-time money management app to track spending habits from eligible TD accounts and credit cards.We’re pretty lucky in a lot of ways that we’re able to work with some of the smaller playersLinda Mantia, executive vice-president, digital, payments and cards at RBC, said mobile applications have been a key focus.“There’s very few things that allow you to be more relevant to the client, more convenient to the client, more secure than other channels and obviously incredibly cost-effective,” she said.Royal Bank has recently launched a new version of its RBC Mobile and RBC Wallet apps and revamped the look of its online banking website. A redesign of its online brokerage site is on the way.Mantia said RBC both works with and competes against fintech companies.“We’re pretty lucky in a lot of ways that we’re able to work with some of the smaller players,” she said.“It is a bit win-win for us — to be scared of them, to meet with them, to visit them — because the last thing you want is for people who have always been in banking trying to reimagine banking. You need the stimulus of outsiders.” read more

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Foreign exchange rates

These are indicative wholesale rates for foreign currency provided by the Bank of Canada on Friday. Quotations in Canadian funds.Australia dollar 1.0048Brazil real 0.3978China renminbi 0.1941Euro 1.4853Hong Kong dollar 0.170111India rupee 0.02057Indonesia rupiah 0.0001000Japan yen 0.01193Malaysia ringgit 0.3094Mexico peso 0.07373N.Z. dollar 0.9670Norway krone 0.1570Peruvian new sol 0.4074Russia rouble 0.02230Saudi riyal 0.3538Singapore dollar 0.9568South Africa rand 0.10262South Korean won 0.001169Sweden krona 0.1521Switzerland franc 1.3687Taiwanese dollar 0.04378Thailand baht 0.03909Turkey lira 0.3784U.K. pound 1.6884U.S. dollar 1.3268Vietnam dong 0.000058 read more

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Military to be disengaged from all commercial activity

The UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein had told the UN Human Rights Council recently that despite welcomed steps towards demilitarization after the currenjt Government took office, such as the removal of checkpoints, the military presence in the north and east remains heavy and a culture of surveillance and, in certain instances, intimidation and harassment persists.He had also said that former detainees released after rehabilitation and civil society groups working with victims continue to face regular security checks and questioning about their work. (Colombo Gazette) The Foreign Minister said the Government wants to ensure military activities in the North and East are on par to what is seen in other parts of the country. Tamil political parties and groups have been calling on the Government to reduce the military presence in the North and East and remove the army from commercial activities.The army has been operating shops, a hotel and has been engaging in other public commercial operations since the end of the war. He noted that the Government has already replaced the military governors in the North and East with civilian governors. The military is to be disengaged from commercial activity, Foreign Minister Mangala Samaraweera said today.He said that the process is now underway and should be completed as part of the de-militarisation of the country by 2018. read more

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Import of nonessential goods to be restricted

It was also proposed at today’s NEC that apatite of Eppawala phosphate deposit to be used for manufacturing single phosphate as a substitute to the imported triphosphate for fertilizer. This measure, it was highlighted, would help Sri Lanka prevent the outflow of important foreign exchange in the future.NEC also reviewed the present screening system at Sri Lanka customs. The NEC emphasized the need to screen all containers instead of the present system of random screening at Sri Lanka customs. The President required an urgent report on the status of the screening capacity of Sri Lanka customs.The Kaluganga basin flood control projects, that aim to control the floods that affect the mainly Rathnapura and Kaluthara cities, were taken up for discussion at the NEC. T The NEC deliberated extensively on measures that Sri Lanka should take in the context of challenges arising due to the appreciation of the US Dollar globally. Special attention was paid to restricting the import of non-essential goods as a temporary measure, while encouraging local substitutes. It was discussed to revise the measures currently in place to restrict the import of non-essential goods. The President also highlighted the importance of restricting the import of non-essential polythene products that have significant environmental concerns and impact local industries negatively. He also pointed out that the country’s prevailing negative balance of trade can be neutralized by prudent measures to revise the import of non-essential items when combined with a proper mechanism to collect the due levies at point of custom clearance. The NEC also took up some concerns of local manufacturers and traders for discussion. As such, the NEC listened to some concerns raised by the importers of sugar to Sri Lanka, who pointed out that they had to incur considerable losses when sugar is sold at the current maximum retail price. However, given the fact that global sugar prices have now decreased continuously, the NEC advised Ministry of Finance and Consumer Affairs Authority to proper mechanism address the concerns of the sugar importers.Local manufacturers of fruit drinks, presenting their concerns to the NEC, sought relief on taxes that have been imposed based on the amount of added sugar in fruit drinks. It was agreed that local fruit growers and manufacturers need to be encouraged and prioritized. As such, it was advised for NEC to appoint a committee to identify a proper mechanism to support the industry. Considering the challenges that Sri Lanka is currently facing due to global uncertainty, President Maithripala Sirisena has instructed the Ministry of Finance to submit a report on imported goods which can be temporarily restricted.The President made these remarks at the 20th session of the National Economic Council, which was held at the Presidential Secretariat this morning (Oct. 16). Ministers Mangala Samaraweera, RajithaSenarathna, Dr. Sarath Amunugama, Duminda Dissanayake, Mahinda Amaraweera, Mahinda Samarasinghe, Malik Samarawickrema, and Secretary to President Udaya R Senaviratne, Chief Economist and Secretary-General of National Economic Council Professor Lalith Samarakoon, Secretary to the Ministry of Finance Dr. R.H.S. Samaratunga, Senior Deputy Governor of the Central Bank Dr. Nandlal Weerasinghe and other officers were present at the session. Local industrialists and traders had also been invited to this session of the NEC. read more

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Colin Kaepernick 49ers Contract Talks Heat Up

Colin Kaepernick believes he is an elite quarterback and expects to be paid as such. The San Francisco 49ers may or may not agree with him. One thing apparently is sure, according to a report: Both sides will meet in the Bay area this week to hash it out.The sides have previously been in contact and met at the NFL draft combine in February, but this upcoming session is an indication that the 49ers and Kaepernick are ready to dig in on a potential deal, according to the Sacramento Bee, which earlier reported the upcoming talks Tuesday morning.Kaepernick, 26, is entering the final season of the four-year contract he received as a second-round pick in 2011. The 49ers can give Kaepernick the franchise tag next winter if a new deal isn’t agreed upon, but the intention of the team is to get a deal done.Kaepernick is 21-8 as the 49ers’ starting quarterback and has led the team to a Super Bowl and two NFC title games.“I’m letting my agents handle all of that, and I’m worried about being out here, trying to get better with my teammates and get ready for the season,” Kaepernick said last week.  “I’m playing football regardless.”San Francisco 49ers owner Jed York, general manager Trent Baalke and coach Jim Harbaugh have all publicly said this offseason that the team’s goal is to get a new contract for Kaepernick this year.Talks have been quiet the past two months as Kaepernick has been part of an ongoing investigation in Miami for what police describe as a “suspicious incident.” Police have said Kaepernick is not a criminal suspect. Authorities hope to wrap up the investigation, which started April 3, in the coming weeks. Kaepernick has strongly denied any wrongdoing. Harbaugh has defended him publicly.Kaepernick likely will look for a salary between $18 million and $20 million. He is set to make $1.073 million this season. The 49ers have $9.142 million in salary-cap room, which is enough to fit in a deal for the quarterback. read more

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Poor shooting dooms Ohio State mens basketball against Indiana 7264

Junior forward LaQuinton Ross (10) drives past an opposing player during a game against Northwestern Feb. 19 at the Schottenstein Center. OSU won 76-60.Credit: Shelby Lum / Photo editorOhio State men’s basketball coach Thad Matta said it was the little things — like missing free throws — that cost his team against Penn State last week.That song remained the same Sunday, as the Buckeyes shot 14-23 from the line compared to 17-21 for Indiana, helping the Hoosiers prevail, 72-64.The free throw line was not the only place No. 22 OSU (22-8, 9-8, sixth in the Big Ten) struggled against the Hoosiers, as the Buckeyes failed to make a 3-pointer in the game, finishing 0-11.A layup by senior guard Lenzelle Smith Jr. with 51 seconds left brought the Buckeyes within six points, but the Hoosiers (17-12, 7-9, seventh in the Big Ten) made enough free throws down the stretch to hold off OSU.The Buckeyes started out strong, much like they did against Penn State Thursday, and led 20-12 after a free throw by Smith Jr. at the 7:54 mark of the first half.That lead didn’t stand, however, as the Hoosiers ripped off 16 straight points to take the lead, 28-20. A pair of layups and a free throw by OSU helped to stop the bleeding, but Indiana still finished the first half on a 21-5 run on its way to a 33-25 halftime advantage.The Buckeyes attempted to fight their way back into the game for the majority of the second half, but were unable to get closer than two in the second half.Indiana was called for its ninth foul of the second half with 10:50 left, but OSU failed to take advantage of the double-bonus, only shooting five free throws for the rest of the game.OSU trailed 58-53 after a layup by junior forward LaQuinton Ross with 3:55 remaining, but Hoosiers’ sophomore forward Hanner Mosquera-Perea then finished an alley oop while getting fouled by Ross. It was Ross’ fifth personal foul of the game, and he exited with 19 points.The Buckeyes struggled the rest of the way to score without Ross on the floor, missing multiple jump shots as they tried to get back in the game.Smith Jr. also tallied 19 points for the Buckeyes, who have now lost back-to-back games after winning six out of seven previous games.The Hoosiers were led by leading scorer and sophomore guard Kevin “Yogi” Ferrell, who scored a game-high 20 points and dished out four assists. Senior forward Will Sheehey had 19 points and six rebounds.OSU senior guard Aaron Craft struggled offensively for the Buckeyes, going 2-11 from the field to finish with seven points. His three steals in the game gave him 324 in his career, tying him for the most all-time in the Big Ten with former Illinois guard Bruce Douglas.The loss drops OSU to sixth in the Big Ten standings, just a half game behind No. 20 Iowa and Nebraska for fourth place. The top four teams in the final Big Ten standings earn a first-round bye in the Big Ten Tournament, set to begin March 13.The Buckeyes have a week off before their next scheduled game, as they are set to host No. 18 Michigan State Sunday on Senior Day. Tipoff is slated for 4:30 p.m. at the Schottenstein Center. read more

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Pictured wedged in a front door the man who got stuck as

first_imgManchester burglar The occupant, a woman in her 60s, saw him suspended from the window after she returned from a trip out.Crawshaw, 47, had shimmied up the drainpipe and managed to poke his head through the window – but the rest of him failed to follow. The locks of the house are said to have been changed amid an evictionCredit:Charlotte Graham/Guzelian He was found stuck kneeling on the windowsill and when police officers PC Dolan and PC Grady arrived on scene the fire service was called. It took 20 minutes to free him in the incident last December.Crawshaw pleaded guilty to burglary at Minshull Street Crown Court and was sentenced to two and a half years in prison. Andy Ripley, a local resident, captured the moment on camera after watching the situation unfold at around 3.45pm on Monday.He said: “He attracted quite a crowd. I think he has been evicted from his house, or is due to be and he couldn’t get in because the landlord changed the locks. “So he decided to break the front window and climb in. But he got a bit stuck. No one helped him. It was all very odd.”A friend of the man arrived with a pair of ladders and once he was freed from the door, the man used the ladders to gain access to the property using the first floor window.A West Yorkshire Police spokesman said: “Officers attended and found no crime had been committed.”In February, pictures emerged of a hapless burglar who had to be rescued after getting wedged in a bathroom window in Greater Manchester. In a hole: Sean Crawshaw was caught dangling from the upstairs window of a house he was trying to raidCredit:Mercury Press The hapless burglar was found stuck kneeling on the windowsill of the houseCredit:Mercury Presscenter_img Manchester burglar stuck A man attempting to break into a house drew a crowd when he became stuck in the front door for a quarter of an hour.The man, who it is claimed once lived at the property before the locks were changed amid an eviction, was attempting to access the house in Huddersfield, West Yorkshire.Witnesses said the man had smashed a window in the door with a brick, before clearing the glass with a stick.He then tried to squeeze through a gap in the door, but became stuck for 15 minutes.As a crowd gathered, the man was helplessly trying to struggle through. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The locks of the house are said to have been changed amid an eviction Sean Crawshaw, from Radcliffe, was caught dangling from the upstairs window of a house he was trying to raid.last_img read more

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Op Ed A Jaundiced Jeffrey

Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedOp-Ed: A Jaundiced JeffreyFebruary 22, 2018In “Opinion”Letter: Take a stand against authoritarianism or sit subjugated and repressedDecember 12, 2017In “Letters”Op-Ed: The Constitution will always be a hindrance to authoritarianismFebruary 16, 2018In “Opinion” By: Mohabir Anil Nandlall, MPAttorney-at-LawLast week, I examined how a democratic Constitution, with its checks and balances, poses a hindrance to authoritarianism. In order to make the essay pragmatic, I gave real-life supporting examples of how the authoritarian runs afoul of the Constitution. I chose events in the rule of Guyana’s most authoritarian politician, Mr. Forbes Burnham, historically, and actions of President David Granger, of more recent vintage, as illustrations to buttress the main plank of my proposition.That article evoked a spirited response from Dr. Henry B. Jeffrey, in his “Future notes” published on the 21st day of February, 2018, in Stabroek News, under the bold caption: “Nandlall’s flawed political theorizing”. The main reason why I chose to support my thesis with both historical and contemporary events involving prominent political personas was, precisely, to avoid theorizing in abstract. Unfortunately, my efforts failed to either persuade or impress Dr. Jeffrey, who accused me of “extremely dubious” and “flawed” political theorizing.The goodly Political Scientist begun by taking umbrage to my contention that Mr. Burnham recognised very early that he could not function under the Westminster Constitution promulgated by Great Britain, and therefore, swiftly moved to change it, eventually, scrapping it all together. He argues that Mr. Burnham operated for 16 years under that Constitution before his own creation, the 1980 Constitution, came into force. To the extent that the inherited Constitution remained in force for 16 years, Dr. Jeffrey is correct. However, he refuses to recognize the underlying and demonstrable dislike, which Mr. Burnham had for that instrument which resulted in constant, incremental, but fundamental changes, made to the Constitution, which struck at its very foundation during that period.In 1964, when Mr. Burnham took the reins of Government under a coalition, comprising of the PNC and the UF, the head of the Judiciary was the Chief Justice. The incumbent was Sir Joseph Luckhoo, a fiercely independent and outstanding jurist, with whom Mr. Burnham did not enjoy good relations. To a democrat that ought not to have mattered. Not Mr. Burnham. For an authoritarian, there must be complicity, if not subservience, in the judicial branch. In 1966, the Independence Constitution not only brought into being the Guyana Court of Appeal but the occasion was used to create a new office as head of the Judiciary. That of the Office of Chancellor – the only of its kind in the entire Commonwealth other than England, herself! To this office, Sir Kenneth Sievewright Stoby, a Guyanese, then in Barbados, was imported and installed. By these constitutional machinations, Sir Joseph Luckhoo, the sitting Chief Justice and hitherto head of the Judiciary, was unceremoniously demoted! Rather than endure such indignity, this distinguished jurist migrated from these shores and took up an appointment as President of the Jamaican Court of Appeal, where he remained up until his retirement.Republican ConstitutionThe second set of major constitutional alterations came on the 23rd day of February, 1970, with the promulgation of the Republican Constitution. This move legally severed our constitutional relationship with Great Britain and replaced the Queen as Head of State with the newly created titular President, with the head of the Executive being the Prime Minister. Thus, the Govern General, as representative of the Queen, as Head of State, was permanently removed from our constitutional infrastructure. It is this constitutional maneuver which laid the foundation for a merger of the Head of State and head of the Executive into one office, styled, the Executive President, which the 1980 Constitution birthed. This Constitution, as I explained last week, was one crafted to Mr. Burnham’s liking and was brought into force by a fraudulent referendum process.Significantly, it is the 1970 constitutional changes that abolished all appeals to Her Majesty’s Privy Council and removed that Court completely from Guyana’s legal system, making the Guyana Court of Appeal the apex of our Judiciary. The environment was, therefore, created for political interference with the Judiciary to begin.At this juncture, it is apposite that I mention that during this period, there was pending, in the court system, a legal challenge to the rigged 1968 national elections, filed by an elector. Had this challenge traveled all the way to the Privy Council, those elections, more likely than not, may have been nullified. Many believed that Mr. Burnham was not prepared to take such a monumental risk. As history has recorded, Mr. Burnham rigged several elections after that and subverted the rule of law in multiple ways. Therefore, the abolition of appeals to the Privy Council was a very calculated artifice.So, Dr. Jeffrey, while the Westminster Constitution remained in force, in six short years Mr. Burnham systematically uprooted and dismantled certain fundamentals pillars upon which it was constructed. By 1980, it was wholly replaced. I hope I have provided enough evidence to persuade you to my point.Dr. Jeffrey next posits that the People’s Progressive Party (PPP) “also ran an autocratic regime and by the time, it demitted office 60% of its own constituency and 80% of Africans did not care for them”. Dr. Jeffrey was a Minister and sat at Cabinet and in the National Assembly for 17 consecutive years in that very PPP Government. I respectfully suggest that he dedicate one edition of “Future notes” to inform what role he played in resisting the PPP’s autocracy. I hope he will not tell us that he was a mere officious bystander. That would not only be incredible but would render him equally guilty by omission. As it regards the latter part of his statement (quoted above), it took a coalition of five political parties, via questionable elections, to remove the PPP after 23 years in Government and yet, only by less than 5,000 votes. Those statistics provided by Dr. Jeffrey, therefore, cannot be correct.Guyana Bar AssociationDr. Jeffrey next attributes to me a proposition, which he labels “absurd” but which I never advanced. He writes: “Furthermore, absurd as it is, Mr. Nandlall appeared to have been suggesting that gridlock does not now exist in the appointment process…”Of course it does. It is in recognition of this gridlock that I posited that the framers of the Constitution also recognised the same and in order to break this gridlock, crafted Article 127 (2). Dr. Jeffrey does not so construe Article 127 (2). Well, I do not know for what else Article 127 (2) was intended, if not to break a gridlock, created by Article 127 (1). He then blames the PPP Government “for not making sufficient effort to use the constitutional reform process to solve the problem”. That it was the constitutional reform process that produced the “problem”, clearly eluded Dr. Jeffrey. In fact, there was no “constitutional reform process” thereafter, for the PPP to “solve the problem”.Dr. Jeffrey then advances the proposition that in his opinion, the President can still lawfully appoint his nominees to act by utilizing Article 127 (2). No, he cannot. Clearly, the goodly Doctor is wandering into territory with which he is unfamiliar. My views aside, the Guyana Bar Association in a recent missive declared that should that occur, the appointments would be “null, void and unconstitutional”.Finally, I endorse Dr. Jeffrey’s concurrence with the sentiments expressed by the President of the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) that, “acting appointments for protracted periods are generally inimical to fearless, independent performance” and that “good governance and the welfare of the citizens require that the top judicial officers of Chancellor and Chief Justice be properly filled…” However, I digress sharply from the learned President of the CCJ, who places the solution in litigation. In my view, apart from making declaratory orders to the effect, that such a state of affairs is repugnant to the rule of law, a Court can do no more, having regard to the clear and express language of Article 127 (1). It cannot compel the agreement, which the Article requires. Neither can it substitute itself for those in whom the Constitution places the responsibility to procure those appointments. Should a Court endeavour to do either, it would be turning the Separation of Powers doctrine on its head. read more

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No gender in life under Davy Fitz gains in the GAA and

first_img Mar 6th 2019, 7:00 AM Short URL Wednesday 6 Mar 2019, 7:00 AM 29,103 Views “I do see the value now — when you’re in the thick of things and putting in serious hours — the value of having the right people around you. Your friends and your family, that’s so important for me anyway. It’s environmental. That’s number one. “Number two: role models. You don’t see yourself as a role model, you see yourself as someone going in and getting the job done. Step up and deliver what you have to do, look to be challenged at every turn.”The 31-year-old has experienced absolutely no issues so far as a female coach — she sees herself as just a coach, plain and simple, exactly as her players and the rest of the backroom team do — and she was, in no way, forced to have a thicker skin from the get-go. In goal with Wexford in 2016. Source: Donall Farmer/INPHOShe had the confidence, and that was noted.“My own confidence was backed by a gentleman who gave me an opportunity, and that man’s name is Davy Fitzgerald,” she smiles.“There was no gender. There was someone who has achieved something and who maybe brings something different. That’s a sign of a strong leader who is willing to look outside the box and not just go to the normal tool kit and bring in the norm.“I was given an opportunity to come in last year and link in with the head goalkeeping coach. To assist him and to bring new ideas — any ideas. It was a great learning curve for me to be involved. This year I’ve taken a wider, broader stance. I’m involved in outfield collective play as well. I do a lot of face-to-face with the player.”With Chelsea Women’s Super League manager Hayes to her immediate right, D’Arcy alludes to her set-up, and her players in London. “When you’re in the professional side of sport, you have more contact with players,” she continues. “There’s an opportunity to go in from nine to four each day and see the player, talk to the player, get to know the player.“In GAA circles, you have three to four hours in the evenings. Players are coming in, stressed coming from work with stuff going on in their lives. They’re there to train.“What has evolved in the game, I think, is getting to know the player outside of the training environment. That will only bring them on in the training environment too.“I’ve loved every minute of it. I have everything positive to say about my experience. The lads are great. Davy’s a mentor. The other coaches are mentors to me as well. I have a lot to learn still, I put my hands up there.” Wexford hurling coach Mags D’Arcy. Source: Donall Farmer/INPHOWhile she says she puts them up, D’Arcy is taking that need to learn more into her own hands and using her initiative. Valentine’s Day this year was an interesting one, — she again thanks her partner — spent in London, putting in a few valuable hours with the Arsenal Women’s Super League team. Their manager, Joe Montemurro, welcomed her in with open arms to watch a training session. ‘This is just going to be everything beyond my expectation,’ D’Arcy thought to herself before watching Irish duo Katie McCabe and Louise Quinn run through their daily routine with their side.“I was just looking at it going, ‘Isn’t it fantastic to be a player able to just rock in as professionally as you can under a great coaching staff, and to be looked after to the best of their ability.’ Everything they were doing, we do it back here in Ireland in the GAA. “There was no differential in terms of what we’re trying to achieve: the game itself, the movement, the positioning of players, tactical work. We do it here but just on a lesser scale in terms of face-to-face time. “We talk about gains in the game. Gains in the game in the GAA for me is getting to develop the player off the field so when they come to training, the team has the confidence to develop to a greater height.”As she touched on earlier, being a role model is a big thing for D’Arcy. She tells a story of how in Wexford Park a few weeks ago, she was walking towards the dressing rooms with two of the senior hurlers when she heard a voice. Mags, we want your autograph…It was the father of a young girl, with D’Arcy more than happy to oblige as the two Model men’s stars shuffled on towards their destination, slightly bemused. Celebrating St Martin’s All-Ireland semi-final win. Source: Oisin Keniry/INPHO“We do knock a bit of craic out of it — the way the men haven’t achieved anything in a while, the way the women have,” she laughs, before realising she may have stuck her foot in it. The rescue attempt.“Now, the landscape is very much changing.”Too late.Wexford camogie, is of course, going through a turbulent time at the minute. They were unable to field a team in an early round of the league and having lost their manager, there’s been plenty of backlash since.MC Joanne Cantwell stalls her, prying for D’Arcy’s opinion or inside knowledge, but that’s to no avail. “We’re here for a specific reason today,” the Wexford coach puts her foot down, before picking up where she was.“To be honest, I do take my role very seriously. I do want to make sure that I am challenging myself at every turn, that I’m exposing myself to as many people in the industry, and as many teams in as many sports to upskill continuously.“In this game, once you are the same as everyone else, you’re pretty much a static commodity. You have to be evolving, your thinking has to be evolving. It has helped my general play as a current club player. “Sunday didn’t go to the manner we had wished, but that’s a learning curve for me as a player and me as a wannabe coach in years to come.”After a bit more chat and further questioning of Hayes and Neville, it’s back to D’Arcy for her parting shot. D’Arcy dejected in Croke Park on Sunday. Source: Oisin Keniry/INPHOCantwell is straight in: does she see herself as the next Wexford camogie or hurling manager?“I’m still at my learning phase, I’m not getting… you’re trying to take a headline there!” she responds, to more laughter and applause from the audience. “Davy is not under threat by anything.“I think before you assert yourself in that that position, you have to do your internship as such. That’s what I frame what I’m doing at the moment.“I couldn’t be in a better environment for it. I feel quite lucky to be in the environment I’m in. For Wexford hurling, it’s three years of a three-year plan. The guys are getting stronger, more conditioned, they’re faster. It’s going to be a very exciting summer for Wexford hopefully.“We’ve utilised a lot of the panel in the league. We’re at a stage now where we have options off the bench, something every team are aspiring to have after Limerick’s state of play last year. It’s at the point now where we’re ready for silverware.”Silverware in the league, is that a priority?“Everything’s a priority, Joanne. Every game is a priority.”“One game at a time, ok,” Cantwell concludes with a smile and her own warm reception from the crowd.Subscribe to our new podcast, The42 Rugby Weekly, here: No Comments https://the42.ie/4525797 Share127 Tweet Email “NOT ONLY DO I not have an All-Ireland club medal, but I don’t have an MBE either,” Wexford legend Mags D’Arcy grins to rapturous laughter around the room. Mags D’Arcy amd Davy Fitzs’ management team. Source: Ken Sutton/INPHOThe four-time All-Ireland senior inter-county camogie championship winner and Davy Fitzgerald’s hurling coach is under the spotlight at Liberty Insurance’s Women in Sport: The Coaching Effect event, alongside England Netball Coach Tracey Neville MBE and Chelsea women’s manager Emma Hayes MBE.D’Arcy, a two-time All-Star winning goalkeeper, is just off the back of a heartbreaking All-Ireland final loss with her club St Martin’s in Croke Park on Sunday, but is in high spirits against the odds.“My journey isn’t as well developed as the girls in terms of coaching,” she says, 12 months since she confirmed her addition to Fitzpatrick’s backroom team at the same event in 2018.“I’m a complete rookie at this stage in my career. Over the last 13 to 14 months, I’ve really seen the value of creating an inner circle and surrounding yourself with the right people. I’m very lucky to have a very supportive partner who allows me to follow my passion.“Creating the right environment is incredibly important to be able to harness those opportunities. To be in the right position in life to be able to take the opportunity once it comes. Maybe I’ve grown up a little bit since last year,” she smirks. ‘No gender’ in life under Davy Fitz, gains in the GAA and a recent learning trip to Arsenal Wexford legend Mags D’Arcy is enjoying her ‘internship’ in the Wexford senior hurling backroom team. By Emma Duffy Subscribe Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

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